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Cornell University Library 
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A special loan exhibition of musical ins 




3 1924 017 651 989 



CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 




MUSIC 



CN worshipful 
ompanp of . . 

musicians. 




Catalogue 



Iioan (Exhibition 



FISHMONGERS' HALL, 



1904. 



PRICE SIXPENCE. 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924017651989 



Under the Distinguished Patronage of 

HIS MAJESTY THE KING, 

Her Majesty Queen Alexandra, 

And Their Royal Highnesses THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS 

of Wales. 



A SPECIAL 



Loan Exhibition 

OF 

Musical Instruments, Manuscripts, 
Books, Portraits, 

And other Mementoes of Music and Musicians, 



Formed to commemorate the Tercentenary 
of the granting by King James I. of a 
Charter of Incorporation to the WORSHIP- 
FUL COMPANY OF MUSICIANS in 1604. 



Held by kind permission of the WORSHIPFUL' COMPANY- OF 

FISHMONGERS, at their HALL, LONDON BRIDGE, 

JUNE-JULY. 1904. 



The 



Worshipful Company of Musicians. 



At a Court Meeting held on the 20th day of January, 1903, it 
was unanimously resolved, on the motion of Sir Homewood Crawford, 
that to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the granting by King 
James I. of a Charter of Incorporation to the Musicians' Company 
on the 8th day of July, 1604, an Exhibitition of Ancient Musical 
Instruments, Manuscripts, Autographs, Portraits, Books and other 
mementoes of music and musicians be held under the auspices of 
the Company in the year 1904. 

At a Court Meeting on the 5th of February, igo3, the following 
members of the Company were elected to form a Committee to carry 
out this undertaking, -.with Sir Homewood Crawford as Chairman, 
namely : — 

Che faster. 
William Cordy Herring, Esq. 

Senior Varden. 
Charles Thomas Daniel Crews, Esq., F.S.A. 

Junior Varden. 
Edward Ernest Cooper, Esq. 



Robert Edmund Brandt, Esq. 
Sir Frederick Bridge, M.V.O., 

Mus. Doc. 
The Rev. Thomas Henry Cart, 

M.A. 
Capt. Adrian Charles Chamier, 

F.S.A, 
Sir Ernest Clarke, M.A., F.S.A. 
John Clementi Collard, Esq. 
Sir Homewood Crawford. 
Clifford Blackburn Edgar, 

Esq., Mus. Bac. 



The Rev. R. H. Hadden, M.A. 
Frank Harwood Lescher, Esq. 
W. H. P. Leslie, Esq. 
Alfred Henry Littleton, 

Esq. 
Sir George Martin, M.V.O., 

Mus. Doc, 
Col. Thomas Bradney Shaw- 

Heli.ier. 
Charles Ernest Rube, Esq. 
Thomas Lea Southgate, Esq. 
Joseph Edward Street, Esq. 



Clerk. 
Thomas Collingwood Fenwick, Esq. 

fjon. Secretaries. 
A. F. Hill, Esq., F.S.A. J. F. R. Stainer, Esq., M.A. 



Introduction. 

TO England is undoubtedly due the credit of 
having originated the idea of holding public 
exhibitions of Musical Instruments. The 
first exhibition of the kind was that held in 
1872 at the South Kensington Museum. It is 
gratifying to know that the success of that under- 
taking led in due course to its imitation abroad ; 
and that similar exhibitions were held at Milan in 
1 88 1, at Bologna and Brussels in 1888, and in 
Vienna in 1892 ; and exhibitions of the same kind 
were also held at South Kensington in 1885 and at 
the Crystal Palace in 1900. As a further example 
of the same movement may be mentioned the 
collection of Wind Instruments brought together at 
the Military Exhibition at Chelsea in 1890, under 
the direction of Colonel Shaw-Hellier, a Liveryman 
of the Company of Musicians, and at that time 
Commandant of the Royal Military School of Music, 
Kneller Hall. Nor must we fail to remember the 
Purcell Exhibition at the British Museum to com- 
memorate the bicentenary of the composer's death ; 
and the collection of portraits of musicians and of 
musical compositions shown at the Earl's Court 
Exhibition of 1897 in illustration of the musical art 
during the Victorian era. 

The promoters of all these exhibitions were 
impelled by the same motive which has prompted 



the Musicians' Company of London, in com- 
memoration of the third centenary of the granting 
of their original Charter, to form the present 
collection of Ancient Musical Instruments and 
valuable Printed Books and Autographs. That 
motive of course is to enable all interested in music 
under its various aspects to contrast, as a fruitful 
means of instruction, its past with its present 
condition— to estimate its growth and development, 
and to observe what progress has been made in the 
work of the instrument maker, composer, player, and 
music printer. From all these points of view it has 
been sought to make the Exhibition as complete as 
possible. And in our efforts to accomplish this 
object we have been stimulated by the Royal favour 
which our project has received ; for their Majesties 
the King and Queen, and their Royal Highnesses 
the Prince and Princess of Wales, have not only 
graciously given us their Royal patronage, but His 
Majesty has also lent us some priceless musical 
treasures from the Royal Library at Buckingham 
Palace. 

Indeed we" believe it may be confidently said 
that the present Exhibition surpasses from the point 
of view of completeness any other that has hitherto 
been held. Particularly is this the case in the 
department of printed books ; and for this gratifying 
result we are greatly indebted to Mr. Alfred Littleton 
and Mr. J. F. R. Stainer, both Liverymen of the 
Guild, and to Dr. W. H. Cummings, Mr. J. E. 
Matthew, and Dr. Henry Watson, of Manchester. 
In autographs, manuscripts, and letters the collection 
is also particularly rich, and to Messrs. Artaria, 



to Mr. Adolph Schloesser, Mr. J. E. Street and Mr. 
Randegger, acknowledgments in this respect are 
especially due. 

So far as the making of musical instruments is 
concerned, it may be thought by some that little is 
to be learned from an exhibition of ancient examples 
of the art. But that would be to take a very 
superficial view of the matter. The violin, it is true, 
remains practically unchanged since Andreas Amati 
made at Cremona in 1564 a violin shown in this 
collection. Apart from size that instrument in its 
lines and form constitutes the standard of violin- 
making for the craftsman of to-day. It is by the 
study of such instruments that the eye is best trained 
and that inspiration is caught. The chances of 
seeing them are rare, and must inevitably become 
rarer, and therefore such an opportunity as is now 
afforded should not be neglected. This observation 
applies more particularly to this Exhibition because, 
in the collection of stringed instruments exhibited, 
* an effort has been made to illustrate the evolution of 
the violin, and specimens are to be seen here which 
have never been shown before. With keyboard instru- 
ments too the external form has altered but little 
from former days ; but the modern worker can 
always learn something from those who have gone 
before if only an opportunity is afforded him of 
examining their craftsmanship. As a striking ex- 
ample of this truth we may cite the Ruckers 
harpsichord lent by the Countess of Dudley, the 
case of which can be studied as an object lesson of 
the highest value. Though it was not within the 
purpose of the present Exhibition to show instru- 



ments of modern manufacture, in the very complete 
and varied collections of wind instruments will be 
found nearly all the most recent types. 

A salient feature of the Exhibition is its wealth 
of portraits. Among those painted in oil are many 
of especial interest, and some which have never 
before been publicly exhibited. Earl Howe, for 
example, lends a Handel portrait that has never 
left Gopsal, his lordship's seat in Warwickshire, 
since the great composer's time. There is, more- 
over, a picture of the scene in Westminster Abbey 
on the occasion of the first Handel Commemoration 
in 1784, painted by a contemporary artist. And 
while on this subject we must not fail to draw 
attention to the unique collection relating to Handel 
lent by Dr. Cummings. Of Haydn we have a 
portrait painted while he was in England in 1792. 
It was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1794, 
.and, we believe, has never since been publicly 
shown. Then there is an engraved portrait of 
Beethoven with autograph signature (1819). Of 
the portraits of former masters of the Musicians' 
Guild who were themselves musicians we are able 
to present only two ; but all will be glad to find 
in the Exhibition the portrait of the late Sir John 
Stainer by Herkomer, kindly lent by Lady Stainer. 
The fine portrait of Dr. Arne, for the loan of which 
we are indebted to the kindness of Mr. Alfred 
Littleton, will doubtless be familiar to some of our 
visitors, as it was formerly in the possession of the 
old Sacred Harmonic Society, and hung in their 
library. There is also a portrait of Monteverde 
which has never been exhibited before, and it is 



doubtful whether any other portrait of the Father 
of Opera exists in England. Unfortunately we 
have not been able to obtain the loan of portraits 
of other famous musicians which are known to be 
in this country. We have, however, secured 
engraved portraits of many well-known English 
musicians, all of which possess considerable interest. 
In this respect we are deeply indebted to Sir 
Frederick Bridge, who lends a valuable collection 
of portraits of his predecessors in the post of 
organist at Westminster Abbey. The Exhibition 
is particularly rich in memorials relating to Purcell, 
Mozart, Beethoven, and Mendelssohn. 

This is necessarily only a brief indication of 
some of the contents of the Exhibition, everything 
in which, we are confident, will amply repay 
careful examination. It is a source of regret to 
the promoters that they found it impossible to 
secure the use of a hall of one of the City Guilds 
for a period extending beyond the very limited 
space of three weeks. Had this been possible, 
the reward of their labours would have been the 
greater ; for the advantages to be derived from the 
Exhibition would have been far more extended, 
and probably more lasting. But the Musicians' 
Company never can repay the kindness of the 
Fishmongers' Company in placing their magnificent 
hall and rooms at their disposal. 

It remains for us to express our grateful thanks 
to all who have contributed to render the holding 
of this Exhibition possible. More especially are 
our acknowledgments for help rendered due to 



His Majesty the King, Her Majesty Queen Alexandra, 
Their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of 
Wales, to the authorities of the Victoria and Albert 
Museum, to Mr. George Donaldson, the donor of 
the Donaldson Museum to the Royal College of 
Music, and a Liveryman of our Guild ; to the Royal 
Academy of Music, the Royal College of Music, 
the Royal Society of Musicians, the Rev. F. W. 
Galpin, M.A., Mr. C. Van Raalte, Mr. J. T. Chapman, 
Mr. T. W. Taphouse, M:A,, and Mr. W. Howard 
Head. Particularly do we desire to thank the 
Chairman of our Committee, Sir Homewood 
Crawford, without whose counsel and aid it is not 
too much to say that it would have been impossible 
to bring the Exhibition to a successful issue. With 
no special resources at our disposal for the purpose, 
we feel that a task has been attempted and accom- 
plished which, while bringing, as we sincerely hope, 
profit to many interested in music, cannot fail to 
reflect credit upon our ancient Guild. 

Among the suggestions put forward in the first 
report of the Sub-Committee appointed to draw 
up a scheme defining the scope and purpose of the 
Exhibition was a proposal that, in order to give 
it more practical and living value, concerts, in 
which some of. the old instruments might be used, 
should be given to illustrate the music of various 
periods. How well this idea has been carried out by 
Mr. T. L. Southgate, a Liveryman of the Company, 
a glance. at the syllabus of lectures to be given with 
musical illustrations will show. Indeed no similar 
scheme has ever been attempted on such a scale at. 
any former musical exhibition. It is true, nevertheless 



that others have previously realised the educational 
value of the proposal, for as far back as 1845 a 
concert of sixteenth -century music, for the per- 
formance of which instruments of the same period 
were used, was given in London by the desire of 
the late Prince Consort. Many will also remember 
the delightful concerts of old music played on 
ancient instruments given at the South Kensington 
Exhibition in 1885 by musicians who came to 
England for that purpose from Brussels and 
Amsterdam. Fortunately we have no longer to 
seek such players abroad ; we can find them at 
home, although as yet we have no society or 
regular body of professional players who devote 
themselves solely to the study and mastery of the 
many instruments that are no longer heard, except 
on rare occasions. Owing to this fact and to the 
craze for "big effects" begotten, of the modern 
orchestra, the charm possessed by much perfect 
and delightful music written by composers of the 
sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is practically 
lost to the world. If then, for no Other reason, 
the Exhibition would be justified by the fact alone 
that by instituting these lectures and providing 
instrumental illustrations to them, it had served 
to open up a practically unexplored region of 
most beautiful music which, notwithstanding all 
that has hitherto been done, is known only to the 
musical historian and to a very small number of 
zealous amateurs. 

A. F. H. 



Pages from the 
History of the Company. 

THE story of the Company of Musicians, 
could it be fully told, would hardly fail to 
prove one of the most interesting chapters 
in our national annals, considering how intimately 
music was associated, particularly from the twelfth 
to the sixteenth century, with the life of the 
English people. It carries us back in fact to the 
days of the Minstrels, of whose guild the Company 
may claim to be the lineal descendant and modern 
representative. Unfortunately, however, its history 
can never be fully written, for its records have 
been hopelessly scattered and lost. Industrious 
researches, which it is hoped to continue, have 
nevertheless resulted in bringing to light some 
more or less disjointed records of the Company, 
which offer interesting glimpses of the state of the 
Musical Art and of the condition of its practitioners 
up to the opening of the seventeenth century. 
Incomplete as they are, it is felt that a glance at 
them will be acceptable' to the reader. 

An Early Charter. 

The earliest extant Royal Charter as yet 
known, by which musicians in England were 
incorporated into a fraternity or guild, was that 
granted by Edward IV. to his Minstrels on April 



24th, 1469. That earlier Charters must have 
existed, however, may be inferred from the fact 
that in this instrument reference is made to similar 
fraternities founded "in times past." It may also 
be inferred from the text of the- document that the 
Minstrels were already fallen from the honourable 
position they held in the twelfth and thirteenth 
centuries, and were on the road to the unhappy 
condition in which we find them a century later, 
when they were classed with " rogues and vaga- 
bonds." Indeed, the Charter, the Latin text of 
which has been preserved for us by Rymer, was 
granted at the prayer of the King's Minstrels (of 
whom Walter Haliday was the Chief or Marshal) 
to remedy the low state into which their fortunes 
were fallen. Their grievances are thus set forth 
in the preamble to the Charter : — 

" Be it known that we have learned from the 
" complaint of our beloved Walter Haliday 
" (Marshal), John Cliff, Robert Marshall, Thomas 
" Grene, Thomas Calthorn, William Cliff, William 
" Christean, William ' Eynsham, our Minstrels, 
" that certain ignorant rustics and craftsmen of 
" various callings in our Kingdom of England have 
" falsely represented themselves to be Minstrels, 
" of whom some, assuming our licence, which has 
" in no way been granted to them, represent 
" themselves as our Minstrels ; under the colour 
" of which licence and of the said art or occupation 
" of Minstrels they in various parts of our 
" Kingdom collect and receive large sums of 
" money from our subjects. 

" And although they are in that art or occupation 
" by no means learned or skilled, and practise 
" divers arts and callings on holidays and ordinary 
" days and derive a sufficient living therefrom, they 



" nevertheless move from place to place on festival 
" days and collect all those profits by means of 
" which our aforesaid Minstrels and our other 
" Minstrels for the time being, sufficiently learned 
" and instructed in the aforesaid art or occupation 
" and practising no other craft, trade, or calling, 
" should obtain their living. 

" Furthermore, we learn that much disgrace 
" is thus brought upon that art or occupation 
" and manifold and manifest deterioration of our 
" Minstrels practising the said art or occupation, 
" and moreover no slight loss and* grievance to our 
" people engaged in agriculture or otherwise." 

To remedy this state of things the King granted 
to his Minstrels power to establish a perpetual 
brotherhood or guild (" such as we learn that 
brothers and sisters of the Fraternity of Minstrels 
of our Kingdom in times past formed, established 
and ordained ") into which they might admit such 
persons, whether men or women, as were likely 
to adhere loyally by them. The guild was con- 
stituted one body and community with perpetual 
succession and was empowered to elect from among 
themselves a marshal (to hold office for life) and 
two wardens yearly for the governance of the 
fraternity. To it were committed full powers for 
the supervision, examination and control of all 
Minstrels in the Kingdom (except those in the 
county of Chester), together with the appointment, 
subject to the Royal approval, of the King's 
Minstrels. It is characteristic of the age that in 
addition to these duties the guild was 

" specially bound to pray for the well-being of 
"us and of our most dear Consort, Elizabeth, 
" Queen of England, so long as we live, and for 



" our souls when we shall have departed from 
" this world, as also for the soul of our most 
" dear lord and father, Richard, late Duke of York, 
" and for the souls of our renowned progenitors, 
" and for all the faithful departed, both in the 
" Chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary within the 
" Cathedral Church of St. Paul in London, and in 
" our Royal Free Chapel of St. Anthony in our 
" same City of London." 

Moreover, part of the fines levied upon 
offending brethren was assigned to the provision 
by the Guild of "wax candles, commonly called 
tapers," in the Chapels named. 



A Picturesque Incident. 

It will be noted that the Minstrels of the 
county of Chester are exempted from the juris- 
diction of the Guild. The exemption is due to a 
curious incident in English history, upon which 
Mr. G. P. R. James based a pretty little story 
entitled "The Fight of the Fiddlers." A copy of 
the book, which is probably now somewhat rare, 
is exhibited in the present Exhibition. An account 
of the event referred to, taken from Sir Peter 
Leycester's " Historical Antiquities of Cheshire," 
is printed both by Sir John Hawkins in his "History 
of Music " and by the author of the " Memorials of 
the Duttons of Dutton in Cheshire," in which 
family was vested jurisdiction over the Minstrels 
and " other Vagrants " of the county. This 
authority was conferred upon Hugh de Dutton 
in the time of King John by Randle, third Earl 
of Chester, under the following circumstances : — 



" Randle among the many conflicts he had was 
" distressed by the Welsh and forced to retreat 
" to the Castle of Rothlent in Flintshire about 
" the reign of King John, where they besieged 
" him. He presently sent to his Constable of 
" Chester, Roger Lacy, surnamed Hell for his 
" fierce spirit, that he would come with all speed 
" and bring what forces he could to his relief. 
" Roger having gathered a tumultuous rout of 
" fiddlers, players, coblers, both men and women, 
" out of the City of Chester (for it was then the 
" fair time in that City) marched immediately 
" towards the Earl. The Welsh, perceiving a 
" great multitude coming, raised the siege and 
" fled. The Earl coming back with his constable 
" to Chester gave him power over all the fiddlers. 
" and shoemakers, but John, his son, conferred 
" this authority on his steward, who was then 
" Hugh de Dutton, and his heirs." 

Out of this concession arose a custom of 
licensing the Minstrels of the county, for which 
purpose a Court was held annually at Chester on 
St. John the Baptist's Day (Midsummer Day), when, 
each Minstrel who sought for a licence bad to give 
four flagons of wine to the representative of the 
Dutton family, who presided, and pay 4^d. The 
right of the Duttons in this matter was tested by 
the Crown by writ of Quo Warranto and was- 
admitted, and it was subsequently recognised in 
various Acts of Parliament relating to Vagabonds.. 
The last Court was held in the year 1756. 

The Minstrels of the City of London. 

How long the Fraternity of Minstrels established 
by the Charter granted by Edward IV. endured, or 
whether it wrought any improvement in the con- 



dition of the Minstrels, there is nothing to show. 
Search has brought to light entries in various 
records of the Corporation of the City of London 
relating to the employment of Minstrels as far back 
as the year 1334, but they contain no mention of 
the guild. About the year 1500, however, we find 
in existence a "Fellowship of Minstrels and Free- 
men of the City of London," and we see that 
they too were suffering under precisely the same 
grievances as those of which the Minstrels of 
Edward IV. had complained. For in a petition 
to the Lord Mayor and Aldermen they set forth 
that owing to the " Continuell recorse of foreign* 
Minstrells daily resorting to the Citee out of all the 
contrays of England" they are "brought in such 
povertie and decaye that they be not of power or 
habilrtie to have charges to pay lote and scot and 
do their dutie as other freemen doon." The plaint 
is thus in substance a repetition of that made by the 
King's Minstrels some thirty years or so before. 
And for a remedy the fellowship demand that it 
shall be ordained that " no maner of foreigner of 
whatsoever condition he be " shall under penalty 
of paying a fine of 3s. 4d. to the Fellowship be 
permitted to " occupie any Minstrelsy, singyihg, or 
playeng upon any instrument," within the city or 
its franchises. They also ask for the approval of 
certain rules and regulations which they had framed 
for the better government of the Fellowship. By 
these the members are forbidden to "rebuke, 
revile or greve each other with any sclanderous 

* By " foreign " here is clearly meant not only aliens, but all 
musicians who came into the City from other English towns and had 
not been admitted to the freedom of the Fellowship of Minstrels. , , 



wordes or wordes of velanys " ; they are not to 
"tech or inform any other person than their own 
apprentices in any point of this feat of Minstralsy," 
and no freeman is to take any servant for any term 
"otherwise than by apprentishode for vij. yeres 
according to the laudable custome of this Citie." 
This petition was granted by the Court of Common 
Council. 

This revision of the fellowship rules apparently 
failed to overcome the abuses which it was intended 
to repress ; for in 1518 the Master and Wardens 
again appeared before the Lord Mayor with a 
petition for further alterations in the statutes. 
Powers were now sought to slightly change the 
method of electing the governing body, and rules 
were introduced to prevent any freeman from pro- 
ceeding against another at law until he had first laid 
his grievance before the Master and Wardens, who 
" for the honestie of the ffeliship shall charitably call 
the parties before them if they can or may to settle 
the said parties at reest and peace." Members are 
further forbidden to induce servants to leave their 
masters during the time they are under covenant to 
serve ; to " rebuke, revyle, or smyte each other " ; 
no freemen, unless they have been master or 
wardens, are permitted to take more than one 
apprentice, "to the intent that the apprentice may 
thus better be applied, lerned, or sette at work" ; no 
minstrell " shall supplante or get out another being 
hired or spoken to " for any musical engagement ; 
and -no apprentice is allowed till he is declared free 
of the Fellowship to " use or occupie his jnstrument 
openly or privately" in any tavern or at any ceremony. 



With all the efforts made to repress them, the 
" foreigners " were clearly a source of perpetual 
trouble to the Fellowship. In 1555 the Master and 
Wardens again complain of the " dyverse and many 
foreyn Mynstrells " who "exercyse the scyence of 
mynstralsie within the Cytie and Lyberties thereof, 
to the great losse and hindraunce of the gaines and 
profits of the poore mynstrells being fremen of the 
same Cytie." Rules were accordingly enacted for- 
bidding all such "foreign Minstrells" to exercise 
their craft under a penalty of 3s. 4d. The rule 
against the employment of more than one apprentice 
is renewed, and it is further forbidden to play upon 
any instrument in the open streets, lanes or alleys of 
the City between the hours of ten at night and five 
in the morning, though the City " waits " are per- 
mitted to play and keep their " accustomed watches 
as thei at their accustomed tymes and howres vse 
and heretofore have vsed the same." And foras- 
much as 

" dyverse and menie artyfycers and handye. crafts 
" men, as tayllers, showmakers, and such others, 
" leving the vse and exercyse of their crafts and 
" manuell occupacions and giving themselves wholy 
," to wandering abrode, ryott, vyce, and idlenes, doe 
" commonly vse nowe a dayes to singe songs called 
" Thre mens songs in the Taverns, ale houses, 
" Innes, and such other places of this Cytie and 
" also at weadings, &c," 

they are forbidden so to do, inasmuch as the practice 
tended to the "greate losse, preiudyce and hind- 
raunce of the said poore felowship of the Mynstrells 
of the said Cytie." It is also forbidden to any 
person " foren or freman " to keep or teach, any 



school of dancing. In 1561 an order was issued 
calling upon Minstrels, not being free of the City 
Fellowship, to be obedient to its Wardens. 

In the course of the next twelve years the mem- 
bers of the fellowship had clearly fallen away from 
the standard of conduct which their rulers were striv- 
ing to maintain among them ; for-in June 14, 1574, 
another scheme of reformation was propounded. 
It begins by reciting that the ancient Company of 
Minstrels 

" hath of late tyme not only much decayed but also 
" hath bynne brought into contempt and hatryd by 
" occasion of sondry disorders and inormyties vsed 
" by persounes exercisinge that arte being not sub- 
" jecte to the good lawes and ordinaunces of the 
" Company, to the great dishonour of the Cittye, 
" disfurniture of that service, pestering of the 
" Cittye with multitudes of apprentices, dishonest- 
" inge of the said arte and greate occasion of 
" vnchast, wastful, lewde and dangerous practises 
" amonges good citizens children and apprentices." 

With a view therefore to remedy this state of things, 
the rules contained in the former ordinance are 
strictly re-enacted, and members of the fellowship are 
warned to be obedient to the laws and rules passed 
for its good governance. 

A New Charter. 

In spite of the efforts which we have thus seen 
continually renewed to infuse new life into the 
■Fellowship, it appears to have been unable to keep 
its members wholly in hand. And so it comes that 
in 1604 we find the. Society of Minstrels of London 
petitioning the Crown for a new Charter of Incor- 



poration. This was granted by the King, James I., 
on the 8th July of the year named. The Company 
thus constituted is styled "The Masters, Wardens 
and Commonalty of the Art or Science of the 
Musicians of London." They are erected into 
one body politic with perpetual succession and a 
common seal, and are invested with all the privileges 
usually bestowed upon such corporations. They 
are to be governed by a Master, two Wardens and 
thirteen or more (not exceeding twenty) assistants. 
The first Master (Phillip London), first Wardens 
(Isaac Thorpe and Thomas Carter) and fourteen 
assistants were nominated by the Charter. (It is 
interesting to note, as showing the continuity of the 
new Fellowship with its predecessor, that amongst 
the assistants was William Warren, who had been 
Master of the old Company in 1594). Provision 
was made for. the annual election of officers, and 
powers were given for the governance of the 
Fellowship. These powers included authority to 
make all 

" reasonable laws, statutes, constitutions, decrees 
" and ordinances whatsoever, in writing which 
" shall be necessary for the good rule and govern- 
" ment of the Company and of all other Minstrels 
" and Musicians of the City of London and within 
" three miles of the same city ; and for the decla- 
" ration in what manner the Master, Wardens and 
" assistants, and all persons of the Company, shall 
" behave themselves in their offices, art and 
" science." 

Power is further given to make and provide 
pains, punishments and penalties by imprisonment 
and fines or by both, against offenders against the 
said laws and ordinances. 



To the Company is also committed " the survey, 
search, correction, and government of all and singular 
Musicians and Minstrels within the City of London 
and within three miles thereof." 

How the Company was governed. 

In accordance with the authority thus con- 
ferred upon them, the Company adopted by-laws, 
which were confirmed by the proper legal authority, 
the Lord Chancellor and the Judges. Some of 
these regulations are curious and interesting. 

After providing for the election of the Master 
and Wardens and the proper discharge of their 
duties, rules are laid down for the conduct of the 
ordinary members. They are not permitted to 
exercise their art within the jurisdiction of the 
Company without having first obtained written 
permission under the common seal. 

No person of the Fellowship " shall unseemly 
revile, rebuke, smite, or abuse any brother of the 
same Fellowship, either by facing, bracing, evil 
reproaching or affraying." 

It is forbidden to " supplant, defeat or put out, 
or wittingly practice to supplant, defeat or put out 
any musician free of the said Fellowship, being 
first hired and spoken to to serve at any triumphs, 
marriages, revels, feasts," &c, &c. 

A most important rule which, many would 
like to see generally followed at the present day, 
provided that 

" the Master and Wardens, or such other dis- 
" creet and skilful persons as shall be appointed, 



" shall and may at all times call before^them to the 
" Common Hall or to other convenient place 
" appointed, all persons, as well free of the 
" Fellowship as all others, which use or exercise 
" the Art or Science of Musicians in the teaching 
" of musick or dancing within the City of London 
" and three miles thereof, and there examine, 
" approve, and allow the said parties for their 
" sufficiency and skill in the said Art or Science 
" and to reject or disallow of any party for his 
" insufficiency and want of skill. And that no 
" person being disallowed as insufficient and unfit 
" shall presume to exercise the Art or Science." 

Fines were imposed for disorder and abuse 
tending to the hurt or prejudice of the art ; for 
introducing any foreigner to use or practise it, 
and upon all persons not being free of the Company 
who used or exercised it. Strict rules were enforced 
with regard to the fitness of the apprentices and 
their number. After an order forbidding dancing 
on Sundays we find the following : — " Neither 
shall any person sing any ribaldry, wanton or 
lascivious, songs, or ditties, at any time or place 
whereby God may be dishonoured, or any .slander 
or infamy may arise or be given of or to the said 
Science ; " and this under pain of fine and im- 
prisonment. 

It was further ordained "that no persons free 
of the said art or science, or any of their servants or 
apprentices, or any other persons professing the art 
or science, either in consort or othewise, shall at any 
' time play upon any kind of instrument either even- 
ing or morning, at or under any nobleman, knight, 
or gentleman's windows or lodging in the street, or 



the window or lodging of any other person whatso- 
ever, without license or leave " of the Company. 

A similar law forbids the same persons to play 
at any weddings, feasts, banquets, revels, or other 
assemblies or meetings, under the number of four, 
in consort or with violins. 

A fine of twelve pence is imposed upon any 
person "who shall go himself, or suffer his servant 
or apprentice to go, in any open street from house 
to house with an instrument uncased or uncovered, 
to be seen by any passing by." 

The next law dealt with strangers, who were 
clearly as unwelcome in those times as in many 
quarters we know them to be to-day. By this rule 
musicians were forbidden " by themselves, their ser- 
vants, or apprentices, to play upon or with any 
instrument, or use the said art or science of music, 
or any other thing concerning the same in consort, 
or any kind of instrument whatsoever of or with 
any foreigner or foreigners, servants, or apprentices, 
upon pain to forfeit for every such offence three 
shillings and four pence." 

Then comes a regulation with regard to appren- 
tices and servants. It enacts that no musicians 

" shall suffer their servants or apprentices to go 
" by themselves with any music at any feasts, 
" banquets, weddings, hunts, or at any other 
" assemblies, triumphs or occasions, either to go 
" abroad in the streets or to play at any taverns, 
" victualling houses or any other place whatsoever, 
" except they do go in with the Company of two 
" freemen at the least, well and sufficiently exer-' 



" cised and experienced in the said art or science of 
" music, whereof one to be the Master of some one 
" of the said apprentices or servants ; as also 
" foreigners shall in like manner observe the same 
" orders as the freemen, whereby they may be the 
" better guided and directed in that science for the 
" laud, honour, and commendation thereof; and 
" that the freeman or foreigner being Master of the 
" said apprentice or servants shall himself, or the 
" other freemen or foreigner master, offer or present 
" the music, and not any other his apprentice or ser- 
" vant, upon pain to forfeit for every offence three 
" shillings and four pence." 

That the Company had an eye to the morals of 
apprentices is sufficiently attested by the following 
enactment : " Be it also ordained that if any person 
professing the said art or science of Music shall at 
any time by any means, directly or indirectly, by 
himself or willingly know or suffer his servant or 
apprentice to use or practice any manner of unlawful 
games at any time or in any place with any freemen's 
servants or apprentices either of the said art or 
being free of any other Company whatsoever, or 
any foreigners, shall in any wise or by any means 
countenance him or them therein," he shall for 
every such offence forfeit ten shillings or suffer 
imprisonment. 

Other regulations provide for the adjustment of 
grievances between members by the Master and 
Wardens, whose permission is necessary for the 
institution of lawsuits. 



Printed Music. 



PREFACE. 

In this Exhibition the space available for the 
display of printed music is necessarily limited, and 
although a complete exhibition of the kind should, at 
a glance, present a complete history of modern music, 
it has been found necessary to limit this to a selection 
of the rarest of musical publications. A number of 
persons owning music libraries have most generously 
placed their treasures at the disposal of the Committee, 
and as a result it is hoped that the section devoted to 
printed music will form a not unattractive portion of 
the present Exhibition. 

The art of printing from movable types was 
invented in or about the year 1450, and the earliest 
examples of printed music are found from twenty 
to thirty years later. 

The earliest specimen exhibited and the first 
example known, is Gerson's " Collectorium super 
Magnificat." This, a theological work, contains only 
five notes of music. It was printed at Esslingen, in 
Germany, in 1473, and thus forms the foundation of 
music printing. 

The next specimen of printed music which gives 
us some bona-fide musical composition — melodies only 
—is found in Franciscus Niger's " Grammatica Brevis," 
the first work containing music printed in Italy ; its 
date is 1480. 

The earliest example of music printing in France 
in this Exhibition is contained in a Missal printed at 
Lyons, in 1485. The lines or staff only is printed, 
leaving the actual notation to be put inserted by hand. 

England comes last, the first book known to con- 
tain music being Higden's " Polychronicon " printed 



by Wynkyn de Worde in 1495. It contains only a 
few notes, as in the case of Gerson's " Collectorium 
super Magnificat," the first German specimen. 

The above remarks have more especial reference 
to the Art of Music Printing, the history of which 
is fairly well represented. During the latter part of 
the fifteenth century, and the early portion of the 
sixteenth, the publications in connection with Music 
consisted chiefly of treatises on the Art and Science of 
Music, and works for use in the service of the Church. 
In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, England was cer- 
tainly a musical nation, and quantities of madrigals 
and other works were published. 1 These which began 
in 1575 and continued until about 1630 maintain the 
highest rank. The collection of Madrigals of this period 
now exhibited is probably larger than any previously 
brought together. An enormous number of books 
of Psalms with music were published during about 
the same period, and the present Exhibition is par- 
ticularly rich in the display of these Books. A large 
number of Madrigals and some Psalters of foreign 
production are also shown. 

The modern Opera was invented in Italy, and 
its first example, "The Euridice," by Jacob Peri, 
printed and performed in the year 1600, will be 
found among the exhibits. The first Oratorio was 
also produced in Italy about the same time, but 
unfortunately no copy of this is procurable. 

Many good men worked hard for the advance- 
ment of the Art during the seventeenth century. 
Their achievements bring us to the time of the giants 
of Music — Bach, Handel, Purcell, Haydn, Mozart, 
Beethoven — these masters, and their more recent 
successors, will be found well represented in this 
and other portions of the Exhibition. 

A. H. LITTLETON. 



Printed Music, I. 

Case No. 
Books illustrating the History of Music Printing. 



GERMANY AND SWITZERLAND. 

1. Gerson, Johanis. — Collectorium super Magnificat. 

The earliest known specimen of printed musical notation. 
Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Conrad Fyner. 

Essllngen, 1473. 

2. Psalteriiim et Hymnarium. 

The lines only printed. No date or place. Lent by 
Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

c. 1470-80. 

3. Reutlingen, Hugo von. — Flores Musice Artis. 

Undated and probably earlier than 1488. Lent by 
Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

J. Pryss. 
Strasburg, (?) 1488. 

4. Agenda Parochialium Ecclesiarum. 

Michaelis Wenssler et Jacobus de Kilcher. Lent by 
Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Basel, 1488. 

5. Wollick, Nicolas. — Opus Aureum. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

1501. 

6. . Tritonius, Petrus. — Melopoise sive Harmonise Tetracenticse 

super xxii genera carminum. 

Undated, and probably earlier than 1507. Lent by 
Mr. A. H. Littleton. 
■--•'■ '-k . Erhardus Oglin. 

Augsburg (?), 1507 

7. Virdung, Sebastian. — Musica getutscht. 

Contains descriptions and illustrations of the various 
musical instruments then existing. It is also of the greatest 
rarity. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Basel, 1511 

3 



8. Senfel, LudoviCO— Liber Selectarum Cantionum quas Vulgo 

Mutetas appellant. 

Sigimundus Grimmius et Marcus Wirsungus. Lent by 

Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Augsburg, 1520. 

9. Froschius, Joannes.— Rerum Musicarum opusculum. Lent by 

Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Petrus Schoeffer et Mathias Apiarius. 

Strasburg, 1535. 

10. Heyden, Sebaldus.— De Arte Canendi. Lent by Mr. A. H. 

Littleton. 

Johannes Petreius. 

Nuremberg, 1540. 

11. Heiden, Sebaldus. — Die Einsetzung und brauch des heyligen 

Abentmal. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Nuremberg, 1514. 
White notes on black ground. Heilip Alma Mapel (?). 
Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Nuremberg, 1544. 

12. Kirchengesanng. — Teutsch und Lateinisch. Lent by Mr. 

A. H. Littleton. 

Johann vom Berg und Ulrich Neuber. 

Nuremberg, 1557. 



ENGLAND. 

13. Higden, Ranulph. — Polychronicon. Englysshed by Sir Johan de 

Trerysa. 

The earliest known specimen of musical notation printed 
in England. In Caxton's edition of this work (1482) the 
space is left blank for the notation to be filled in by hand. 
Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Wynkyn de Worde. 

Westminster, 1495. 

14. Merbecke, John. — The Booke of Common Praier noted. Lent 

by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Richard Grafton. 

London, 1550. 

15. Utenhove, Jan. — Hondert Psalmer Davids. Lent by Mr. A. H. 

Littleton. 

John Day. 

London, 1561. 

16. The whole Psalmes in Foure Partes. Lent by Mr. A. H. 

Littleton. 

John Day. 

London, 1563. 



17. Mornyng and Evenyng Prayer and Communion set forthe in 

foure partes. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

John Day. 

London, 1565. 

18. Tallis Thomas, and Byrd William. — Cantiones, quse ab 

argumento sacrae vocantur, quinque et sex partium. Lent 
by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Thomas Vantrollerius. 

London, 1575. 

19. Mnsica Transalpina— Madrigales translated of foure, five and 

sixe parts. Published by N. Yonge. Lent by Mr. A. H. 
Littleton. 

Thomas East. 

London, 1588. 

20. Dowland. — Musical Banquet. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

1610. 

21. Parthenia. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

1611. 

22. Tailour, Robert- — Sacred Hymns, consisting of Fifti select 

Psalms of David and others, Paraphrastically turned into 
English Verse. And by Robert Tailour, set to be sung in 
Five parts, as also to the Viole, and L u te or Orph-arion. 
Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Thomas Snodham. 

London, 1615. 

23. Ravenscroft, Thomas. — The whole Booke of Psalmes with the 

Hymnes Evangelicall and Songs Spirituall. Composed into 
4 parts by sundry Authors. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 
Printed for the Company of Stationers. 

London, 1621. 

24. Simpson, Chr. — The Division-Violist : or, An Introduction to 

the Playing upon a Ground. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

William Godbid. 

London, 1659. 

25. Barnard Church Music. Lent by Mr. J. F. R. Stainer. 



ITALY. 

Niger, Franciscus. — Grammatica brevis. 

The earliest known specimen of practical music printed 
from type or by any other method. Lent by Mr. A. H. 
Littleton. 

Theodore. 

Venice, 1480. 

5, 



27. Missale. — Secundum ordinem fratrum predicatorum. 

The second • liturgical work, with musical notation, 
printed from type. The first was printed at Wiirzburg 
in 1481. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Octavianus Scotus, 

Venice, ' 



28. Burtius, Nicolaus. — Musices opusculum 

The earliest specimen of music printed from wooden 
blocks. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Ugo de Rugeriis, 

Bologna, 1487. 

29. Verardus, Marcellinus. — Caesanatis Elegia, &c. 

The earliest piece of music printed at Rome. Lent by 
Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Eucharius Silber (alias Franck), 

Borne, 1493. 

30. Gafttrius. — Practica Musicse. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Milan, 1496. 

31. Pierre de la Rue. — Missale. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

Ottaviano dei Petrucci. 

Venice, 1503. 

32. Liber Quindecim Missarum. Lent by Italian Government. 

Rome, 1516. 

33. Aaron Pietro— Thoscanello de la Musica. Lent by Mr. A. H. 

Littleton. 

Bernardino et Mattheo di Vitali, 

Venice, 1523. 

34. Mottetti del Prutto. — Primus Liber cum quinque vocibus. 

Probably the first work printed by Gardane (contains one 
of his compositions). Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 
Antonius Gardane, 

Venice, 1538. 

35. Caroso, Fabritio. — II Ballarino. Music and Dancing. Printed 

from type with tablature. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Francesco Ziletti. 

Venice, 1581. ' 

36. Merulo, Claudio. — Toccate D'Intavolatura D'Organo. Libro 

primo. 

The earliest specimen of music engraved on copper plates 
in the Exhibition. Simono Verovio appears to have been 
the first printer to use copper plates, and his earliest publi- 
cation known is dated 1586. See British Museum Catalogue 
•-■ • of - Printing, Exhibition, 1901. Lent by Mr. A. H. 
Littleton. .... 

Simono Verovio. 

Rome, 1597. 



37. Peri, Jacopo. — La Musiche di Jacopo Peri, nobil Fiorentino 

sopra L Euridice del Sig. Ottavio Rinuccini. 

The first modern opera ever printed or performed. Lent 
by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Georgio Marescotti. 

Florence, 1600. 

38. Kircher, A. — Phonurgia Nova, sive Conjugium Mechanico — 

physicum Artis et Naturae. 

This book of the learned Jesuit is a beautiful example of 
printing. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

1673. 

FRANCE. 

39. Missale secundum usum romane ecclesie. Lent by Mr. A. H. 

Littleton. 

Mathias Hus. 

Lyons, 1485. 
Lines only printed. 

40. Gervaise, Claude. — Quart Livre contenant XXVI Chansons 

musicalles a troys parties. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Pierre Attaignant. 

Paris, 1550. 

41. Fseaumes de David. — Mis en Rhythme Francoise par Clement 

Marot et Theodore de Besze, avec nouvelle et facile 
methode pour chanter chacun couplet des Pseaumes sans 
recours au premier. Lent by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

W. W. 

Lyons, 1560. 

42. Fseaumes. — Edited by Pierre _ Davantes, who claims to have 

invented the numerical notation which appears in the volume 
for the first time. 

43. De Laborde. — Choix de Chansons mises en musique. Lent by 

Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

De Lormel. 

Paris, 1773. 

THE NETHERLANDS. 

44. Pynson. — Sarum Processional. Printed on vellum. Lent by 

St. John's College, Oxford. 1502. 

45. Manuale ad usum Sarum. — Lent by the Master and Fellow 

of Corpus Christi College. 

Printed by R. Pynson. 

London, 1506. 

46. Sarum Hymnal. — Lent by the President and Fellows of 

Magdalen College. 

Printed by Kingston and Sutton. 1555. 



47. Souter, Liedekens.— Exemacct ter eeren Gods, op alle die 

Psalmen va David. 

The second book containing musical notation printed in 
the Netherlands, the first having appeared in 1539. Lent 
by Mr. A. H. Littleton. 

Symon Cock. 

Antwerp, 1540. 

48. Poullain & Kebel— The forme of Prayers and Ministration 

of the Sacraments used in the Englishe congregation at 
Geneva. Psalmes of David in Englishe Metre by Thomas 
Sternholde and others. The Catechisme. All three m one 
book. Lent by Mr. J. E. Aylward. 1558. 

49. Utenhove, Jan.— Hondert Psalmen Davids. Lent by Mr. A. H. 

Littleton. 

See supra, "John Day." London, 1561. 

50. Lowe, Edward. — A short Direction for the performance of 

Cathedrall Service. Oblong duodecimo. Lent by the Royal 
College of Music. Oxford, 1661. 



Printed Music, II. 



ENGLAND. 

51. An Accurate Method to attain the Art of Playing ye Violin, with 

Duets and Lessons by Carlo Tessarini Da Rimini. Lent by 
Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

Printed by Longman and Broderip. 

London. 

52. The Art of Playing on the Violin, with a collection of the finest 

Rigadoons, Almands, Sarabands, Courants, and Opera Airs 
extant. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

Engraved, printed and sold by W. Dicey. 

53. The Art of Playing on the Violin, to which is added "A 

Collection of the finest Rigadoons, Almands, Sarabands, 
Courants, and Opera Airs extant"; also "A Dictionary 
explaining such Greek, Latin, Italian and French words as 
generally occur in Musick." Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

54. Tartini, Giuseppe. — L'Arte del Arco on L'Art de L'Archet, 

contenant 38 Variations composees sous la plus Belle 
Gavotte de Corelly. Engraved by A. Hummell. Printed 
by Welcher, in Gerard Street, St. Ann's, Soho. Lent by 
Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

55. Turner, W. — Sound Anatomized. Lent by Mr. T. L Southgate.' 

1724. 

8 



56. Playford, John.— Introduction to the Skill of Music. Lent by 

Mr. T. L..Southgate. 1687. 

57. Simpson, Christopher. — A Compendium of Practical Music. 

Third edition. Lent by Sir August Manns. 

London, 1678. 

58. Simpson, Christopher. — Compendium of Practical Music. 

Third edition. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 1678. 

59. Simpson, Christopher.— Chelys, Minuritionum Artificis Exor- 

nata, xxx.; The Division Viol. Second edition. Lent by 
Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

W. Godbid, 

London, 1667. 

60. Playford, John.— A Brief Introduction to the Skill of Musick. 

Fourth Edition. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

William Godbid. 

London, 1664. 

61. Playford, John. — Dancing. Master. Lent by Mr. T. L. 

Southgate. 1652. 

62. Campion Thomas. — A New Way of making Foure parts in 

Counter-point, by a most familiar and infallible Rvle. Lent 
by The Royal College of Music. 

London (n. d.) (?), 1618. 

66. Gaiarius, Franchhms. — Theoricum opus Musice. The earliest 

printed treatise on Music. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

Francisco di Dino. 

Naples, 1480. 

67. Aaron Petms. — Libri tres de institutione harmonica. The 

author, an important writer on the theory of music, was born 
at Florence about 1490. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

Bononiae, 1516. 

63. Gafurius, Pranchinus. — Theoricum opus Musici. Second 

edition of the above, with Sol-Fa syllables on lines. Lent 
by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

Milan, 1492. 

69. Gafurius, Franchinus. — Practica Musicse. Lent by Mr. Alfred 

Littleton. 

Brescia, 1497. 

70. Cantor inus. — Compendium musices confectum ad facitiorem 

instructionem cantum choralem discentium. With Cut of 
Singers round a desk, in black ink. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. 
Arkwright. 

Venetijs, 1500. 

71. Gafurius, Franchinus. — Practica Musicae. Lent by Mr. Alfred 

Littleton. 

Brescia, 1502. 



C 2 



72. Gafurius, F. — Angelicum ac divinum opus musicse, i5°8. .An 

epitome of the Theoricum opus and of the Practica Musicae, 
in the Italian language. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

73. Gafurius, Franchinus — De Harmonia Musicorum Instru- 

mentorum. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

Milan, 1508. 

74. Gafurius, F. — Practica musica? utriusque cantus. Fourth and 

last edition. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Impressa: Venetiis, 1512. 

75. Folianus, Ludovicus.— Musica Theorica. Lent by Mr. Alfred 

Littleton. 

Venice, 1529. 

76. Arou Piero. — Toscanello in Musica. Lent by Mr. Alfred 

Littleton. 

Venice, 1539. 

77. Aron Pietro. — Lucidario in Musica, Girolamo Scotto. Lent by 

Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

Venice, 1545. 

78. Galilei, Vinceutio. — Discorso della Musica antica e della 

moderna. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Fiorenza, 1581. 

79. Cerone, Pedro.— El Melopeo y Maestro. Folio. Extremely rare. 

Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Naples, 1613. 

80. Fux, J. J. — Salita al Parnasso. translated from Latin by 

Sacerdote Alessandro Manfredi. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Carpi, 1761. 

81. Tartiui, Giuseppe.— L'Arte del Arco. Lent by Mr. J. E. 

Matthew. 

82. Virdung, Sebastian.— Musica getutscht und auszgezogen. The 

earliest book in musical instruments. Lent by Mr. Alfred 
Littleton. 

Basel, 1511. 

83. Glareanus, H. L. — Dodecachordon. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Basel, 1547. 

84. Glareanus, Heiirichus Loritis.— Dodecachordon. Lent by Mr 

Alfred Littleton. 

Henrichus Petri. 

Basel, 1547. 

85. Gafurius, F — Apologia adversus Joannem Spatarium et com- 

plices musicos. First explorion in print between Spataro 
and Gafurius on the doctrines of Romis de Pareia T enf- hv 
Mr. J. E. Matthew. J y 

Bononiensis, 1520. 
10 



86. Spataro, Joannes. — Errori de Franchino Gafurio da Lodi : 

i sua deffensione et del suo preceptore Maestro Bartolomeo, 
Ramio, Hispano : subtilemente demonstrati. Spataro's 
first rejoinder to Gafurius. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Bononia, 1521. 

87. Spataro, Joannes. — Et probatissime Demonstratione . . . 

contra certe frivole et vane excusation. Lent by Mr. J. E. 

Matthew. 

No reply of Gafurius to Spataro's " Errori de Franchino 
Gafurio" is extant, but some rejoinder must have been 
made by him or his friends which called forth the above 
invective. Gafurius died in 1522. 

83. Agricola, Martin. — Musica instrumental deudsch. Lent by 
Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

George Rhaw. 

Wittetnberg, 1529. 

89. Spataro, Joannes. — Tractato nel quale si tracta de la perfec- 

tione de la perfectione de la sesquialtera, etc. Lent by Mr. 
J.E.Matthew. 

Treatise mostly against Gafurio, although he had been 
in his grave for ten years. 

90. Luscinius, Ottomar. — Musurgia seu Praxis Musicae. Lent by 

Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

Joannes Schott. 

Strasburg, 1536. 

91. Listenius, Nicolaus. — Musica: ab authore denuo recognita, 

multisq : novis regulis et exemplis adaucta. Lent by the 
Royal College of Music. 

Nuremberg (n. d.) (1540 ?). 

92. Parker, Archbishop.— Psalter, presented by his wife Margaret 

to the then Countess of Shrewsbury, with inscription on fly- 
leaf. Lent by the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

1567. 

93. Arbeau, Thoinot. — Orchesographie et Traicte en forme de 

Dialogue. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

langres, 1588. 

94. Praetorins, Michael. — Syntagmatis Musici Tomus (Secundus 

et Tertius). Vol. I. (in Latin), Wittemberg, 1615. Vols. II. 
and III. (in German), Wolfenbiittel, 1619. One of the rarest 
books in musical literature. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

95. Praetorius, Michael. — Syntagma Musicum. Johannis Richter, 

Wittemberg, and Elias Hofwein. Lent by Mr. Alfred 
Littleton. 

Wolfenbiittel, 1615—1620. 

96. Mersenne, Marin. — Harmonie Universelle. One of the rarer 

works of musical literature. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Parts, Cramoisy, 1636. 
11 



97. Mersenne, Marin.— Harmonicorum Libri. Lent by Mr. J. E. 

Matth6W - Paris, 1636. 

98. Locke, Matthew.— " Modern Church Music"; Pre-Accus'd, 

Censur'd, and Obstructed in its Performance before his 
Majesty, April i, 1666. Vindicated by the Author. Lent 
by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1866. 

99. Borjon, C. E— Traite de la Musette. Folio. Lent by Mr. J. E. 

Matthew. 

Lyon, 1672. 

100. Simpson, Christopher. — A Conpendium of practical Musick. 

3rd Edition. Lent by Mr. Herbert Thompson. 

1678. 

101. "Wagenseil, J. C— De . . . Civitate Noribergensi. Lent by 

Mr. Herbert Thompson. 

1697. 

102. Fux, J. J. — Gradus ad Parnassum. Lent by J. E. Matthew. 

Vienna, 1725. 

103. Mattheson, J. — Der Volkommene Capellmeister. Lent by 

Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Hamburg, 1739. 

104. Ksllner, J. P. — Certamen Mvsicum. Bestehend aus Praludsen, 

Fugen, Allemanden, Couranten, Sarabanden, Giguen wie 
auch Menuetten, u.d.g. Drei Suiten. Lent by Mr. H. M. 
Higgs. 

Arnstadt, 1740. 

106. Kircher, A. — New Hall — und Thon-Kunst. Von A. Carione. 

German translation of Kircher's " Phonurgia." Lent by 
J. E. Matthew. 

1673.' 

Instruction Books, etc. 

107. Niger Pranciscns. — De Grammatica libri decern. 1512 

Calendas Februarias. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

108. Omitoparchus, Andreas. — De arte cantandi micrologus, 1533. 

Fourth edition of this very rare work, and the English trans- 
lation by John Dowland, 1609, equally rare. Lent bv Mr. 
J. E. Matthew. ' 3 

109. Bevin Elway.— Briefe and short instruction of the art of 

Musicke. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

Printed by R. Young, at the signe of the Starre on 
Bread-street hill. 

London, 1631 
12 



110. Greeting, Thomas.— The Pleasant Companion ; or, New 

Lessons and Instructions for the Flageolet. Lent by the 
Royal College of Music. 

London, 1680. 

111. Greeting, Thomas. — The Pleasant Companion and New 

Lessons for the Flageolet (Two copies, one with Samuel 
Pepys' monogram, one imperfect). Lent by Sir Frederick 
Bridge. 

London, 1680. 

112. Greeting, Thomas. — "The pleasant companion," containing 

ayres and tunes for the Flagelet. Lent by Mr. Herbert 
Thompson. 

Greeting was the Flagelet Master of Pepys' wife. 

Sixth edition. 1683. 

113. Midgley, Robert. — A new and easie method to learn to sing by 

book. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

Licensed January 29th, 1685-R. 

114. Young Drummer's Assistant. Lent by Mr. Shaw-Hellier. 

c 1750. 

115. Crome, Robert. — The Fiddle new model'd or a useful Intro- 

duction for the Violin, exemplify'd with familiar Dialogues. 
Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

Printed and sold by David Rutherford, at the Violin and 
German Flute, in St. Martin's Court, near Leicester Fields. 
On the fly-leaf is written " Benjamin Hill, 1761." 

London. 

116. Rules, or a short and compleat Method for attaining to play a 

thorough bass upon the Harpsichord or Organ. By an 
Eminent Master. The volume also contains a Dictionary of 
Terms used in vocal and instrumental music. Lent by Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill. 

Printed for and sold by I. Walsh, servant to His- 
Majesty, at the Harp and Hoboy, in Catherine Street. 

117. The Compleat Tutor for the Violin, containing the Best and 

Easiest Instructions for Learners on that Instrument. Lent 
by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

Printed for and sold by I. Walsh. 

118. Guida di Musica. — Early pianoforte tutor published by Hook. 

Lent by Mr. Barnham W. Horner. 

119. New Instructions for the Sticcado Pastorale. — Lent by 

Mr. Arthur K. Hill. 

Printed and sold by Longman, Lukey & Co. 

London. 

120. Complete Instruction for the Guitar.— Lent by Mr. Arthur 

F. Hill. 

Printed and sold by J. Preston, No. 97* near Beaufort 
Buildings, Strand. 

13 



122. The Compleat Tutar for the Fife— Lent by Mr. Shaw 

Hellier. 

123. The Compleat Tutor for Hautboy— Lent by Mr. Shaw 

Hellier. 



Miscellaneous. 

124. Hugo von Reuthingen (Spechtshart ?).— Flores Musice omnis 

catus Gregoriani. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Latin poem written as early as 1332. 1488. 

125. Wollick, Nicolaus. — Opus aureum musices castigatissimum. 

Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. See N0.2S { 

The musical examples are from wood block. 1501. 

126. Chelidonius, Benedictus — Lent by Glasgow and West of 

Scotland Technical College. 1515. 

127. Theseo, Ambrosio. — Introductio in Chaldaicam linguam, 

syriacam atque Armenicam et decern alias linguas. Lent by 
Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

In this book, professing to teach thirteen Oriental 
languages, is an account of a wonderful machine invented 
by the author's uncle, named Afranius, phagotus,. i.e., 
fagotto. 

Rome, 1539. 

128. Tye, Dr. Christopher. — The Actes of the Apostles translated 

into Englyshe metre and dedicated to the Kynge's most 
excellent Maiestye, etc. Lent by the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. 

1553. 

129. VicentillO, Nicola. — L'Antica Musica ridotta alia moderna 

prattica. Lent by Mr. C. T. D. Crews. 

Rome, 1555. 

130. Chapel Royal. — The Old Cheque Book (1561-1744). Lent by 

Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

Published by Rimbault. 

131. Rinuccini, OttaviO. — L'Euridice. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Original word-book of the first published opera, as set to 
music by Jacopo Peri. 

Fiorenza, 1600. 

132. Rinuccini, OttaviO. — La Dafne. Firenze. 

Original word-book of the first opera ever produced. 
The music by Guilio Caccini was never printed, with 
exception of a few fragments in Caccini's " Nuove 
Musiche." Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Florence, 1602. 

133. Hume, Tobias. — Poetical Musicke. Lent by Glasgow and 

West of Scotland Technical College. 

1607. 

14 



134. Ornitoparchus, Andreas.— Andreas Omithoparcus his Micro- 

logus. Translation by John Dowland Lutemst, Lute-player, 
and Bachelor of Musicke in both the Universities. Lent by 
Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Thomas Adams. 

London, 1609. 

135. National Anthem Books.— MS. and Portrait relating to 

(a) Portrait of John Bull, 1628. 

(b) The Smart M. S. 

(c) Thesaurus Musicus — 1st, 2nd and 3rd Editions. 

(d) Gentleman's Magazine for October, 1745. 

Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

136. Herbst, J. A.— Musica Poetica. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Nurnberg, 1613. 

137- Abadeasa, Giovanni Batistta— Intessitura de Varii Fiori overo 
Intavolatura di Chitarra alia Spagnola. In Napoli, Appresso 
Ottavio Beltrano. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

Napoli, 1615. 

138. The Siege of Rhodes — Two copies, Lent by Dr. W. H. 

Cummings. 1656-1670. 

139. Playford, John.— An Introduction to the Skill of Musick. In 

two Books. Formerly published by Dr. Tho. Campion, but 
now republished with large Annotations by Mr. Christoph 
Sympson. Third edition. Lent by the Royal College of 
Music. London, 1660. 

140. The First Day's Entertainment at Rutland House— Lent 

by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

141. Davenant Sir William.— " The Siege of Rhodes" [a Play] 

First and second parts. Lent by the Royal College of 
Music. 

London, 1663. 

142. Salmon, Thomas. — An Essay to the advancement of Musick. 

Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

London, 1672. 

143. Brown, Richard. — Medicina musica ; or, a mechanical essay on 

the effects of singing, music, and dancing, on human bodies. 
Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

London, 1729. 

144. Matheson, J. — Grundlage einer Ehren-Pforte. Lent by Mr. J. 

E. Matthew. 

Alphabetical dictionary of eminent German musicians. 

Hamburg, 1740. 

146. Bach, C. P. E. — Die Wahre Art das Clavier zu spielen. Lent 
by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Leipzig, 1787. 

15 



148. North, Hon. Roger.— Memoir of Musick (edited by Rimbault, 

1846). Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

149. Bimbault, E. F— Early English Organ Builders and their 

Works. Lent byT. L. Southgate. 

1864. 

150. Sutton, F. H.— Church Organs, with drawings of the mediaeval 

organ case at Old Radnor. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

1872. 

151. Engel, Carl.— Catalogue of the Musical Instruments in South 

Kensington Museum. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

1874. 

152. Early Years of Prince Consort.— Presentation copy to Sir 

Michael Costa with Queen Victoria's autograph. Lent by 
Madame Costa. 

153. Bach, J. S. — Annotated copy of the 48 Preludes and Fuques 

Lent by Mrs. G. K. Cook. 

154. Coverdale, Miles. — Psalmes. Lent by Queen's College, Oxford. 

1539. 

155. Day, John. — Psalter. Lent by Brasenose College, Oxford. 

1549. 

156. F. S. — Certayne Psalmes select out of the Psalter of David and 

drawen into Englyshe metre, etc., wyth notes to every 
Psalme in iiii. parts to Synge. Lent by Emmanuel College, 
Cambridge. 

1553. 

157. Sternholde, Thomas, etc. — Psalmes of David in Englische 

Metre. Lent by Society of Antiquaries of London. 

London, 1560. 

158. Sternhold and Hopkins. — Psalms. i2mo (unique). Lent by 

Christ Church College, Oxford. 

1560. 

159. Sternholde, Thomas, etc. — Foure score and seven Psalmes of 

David in English. Lent by the Dean and Chapter of St. 
Paul's. 

Geneva, 1561. 

160. Parker, Archbishop.— Psalter, presented by his wife Margaret 

to the then Coumess of Shrewsbury, with inscription on fly- 
leaf. Lent by the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

1567. 

161. Sternhold and Hopkins. — The whole booke of Psalmes. Small 

folio. Melody only. Lent by Mr. A. Littleton. 

John Day. 

London, 1567. 

16 



162. The whole Booke of Psalmes — Collected into Englishe Metre, 

by Thom. Sternh, John Hopkins, and others. Lent by The 
Corporation of Manchester, from the Henry Watson Musical 
Library. 

Printed by John Daye, dwelling ouer Aldersgate. 

London, an. 1573. 

163. Lasso, Orlando di. — Passio quinque vocufn. Idem Lectiones 

Job, et Lectiones Matutine de Nativitate Christi, quatuor 
vocum. i vol., large folio. 

A volume of the, splendid collection of Church Music ir» 
io volumes, known as Patrocinium Musices, published by- 
Adam Berg, under the patronage of the Duke of Bavaria, 
to which fact it owes its title. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 
Monachie, Adamus Berg. 

1575. 

164. Damon, William. — Psalms. Lent by William Cowan. 

1579. 

165. Byrd, William. — Psalmes, Sonets, and Songs of sadnes and 

pietie, made into Musicke of five parts. Lent by Mr. 
Alfred Littleton. 

Thomas East, 

London, 1588. 

166. Byrd, W. — Liber Primus Sacrarum Cantionum. Lent by 

Christ Church College, Oxford. 

1589. 

167. Byrd, W. — Liber Secundus Sacrarum Cantionum. Lent by- 

Christ Church College, Oxford. 

1591. 

168. Le Jeune, Claude. — " Dodecacorde," contenant Douze 

Pseaumes de David, .... a 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, et 7 parts. In 
separate parts. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

Rockelle, 1598. 

169. Croce, Giovanni. — Musica Sacra to Sixe Voyces. Composed 

in the Italian tongue. Newly Englished. 4*0. Lent by 
J. E. Matthew. 

Thomas Este, the assigne of William Barley. 

London, 1608. 

170. Easte, Michaell— The Third Set of Bookes : Wherein are 

Pastorals, Anthemes, Neopolitaines, Fancies, and Madrigales 
to 5 and 6 parts : Apt both for Viols and Voyces. Lent by 
the Corporation of Manchester. From the Henry Watson 
Musical Library. 

Cantus, 

London, 1610. 

171. Leighton, Sir William. — "TheTeares or Lamentacions of a 

Sorrowful Soule." Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1614. 

17 



172. Sacred Hymns —Consisting of Fifti Select Psalms of David and 

others. Paraphrastically turned into English Verse. And 
by Robert Tailour, set to be sung in Five parts, as also to the 
Viole, and Lute or Orph-arion. Lent by the Corporation of 
Manchester. From the Henry Watson Musical Library. 

London, 1615. 

173. Amner, John.— Sacred Hymns. LentbyDr.W.H.Cummings. 

y 1615. 

174. Este, Michael.— Fourth Set of Bookes : Anthems and Madri- 

eales. Lent by Christ Church College, Oxford. 

1618. 

175. Este, M.— The Sixt Set of Bookes, Wherein are Anthems for 

Versus and Chorus, of 5. and 6. Parts ; Cantus, Apt for 
Violls and Voyces. Lent by the Corporation of Manchester. 
From the Henry Watson Musical Library. 

London, 1624. 

176. Child, William. — ist set of Psalmes. Lent by Christ Church 

College, Oxford. 

1639. 

177. Barnard, John.— First Booke of Selected Church Music. 

Contra tenor Cantus part. (No perfect set known to 
exist.) Lent by Mr. T. S. Bumpus. 

1641. 

178. Lawes. Henry and William. — Choice Psalmes put into Musick 

for Three Voices. Four parts. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

James Young. 

London, 1648. 

179. Child, William. — Choise Musick to the Psalmes of David, for 

Three, Voices, with a continuall Base either for the Organ or 
Theorbo. Two copies, one with four parts in a case, the other 
with them bound in one volume. Lent by the Royal College 
of Music. 

London, 1656. 

180. Psalterinm, Carolinum. — The Devotions of His Sacred 

Majestie in His solitudes and sufferings, rendered in Verse. 
Set to Musick for three Voices and an Organ, or Theorbo, by 
John Wilson, Dr. and Musick Professor of Oxford. Lent 
by the Corporation of Manchester. From the Henry Watson 
Musical Library. 

London, 1657. 

181. Clifford, Rev. James. — Divine Services and Anthems. 2nd 

and enlarged edition. (One of the earliest printed collections 
of words of anthems. Black letter.) Lent by Mr. J. S. 
Bumpus. 

1664. 

182. Pars Organica— Musica Deo Sacra and Ecclesia; Anglican^, 

by Thomas Tomkins. Lent by the Corporation of Man- 
chester, from the Henry Watson Musical Library. 
Printed by William Godbid in Little Britain. 

London, 1668. 

18 



183. Pincell, Henry. — Te Deum and Jubilate, for Voices and Instru- 

ments, made for St. Cacilia's Day, 1694. Lent by Mr. Alfred 
Littleton. 

J. Heptinstall. 

London, 1697. 

184. Weldon, J., Divine Harmony.— Six Select Anthems for a 

Voice alone, with a Thorow Bass for the Organ, Harpsi- 
chord, or Arch-Lute. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

London. 

185. Furcell, Daniel.— The Psalms set full for the Organ or Harp- 

sichord, as they are Plaid in Churches and Chappels. Lent 
by the Royal College of Music. 

London. 

186. Croft, W. — Musica Sacra or Select Anthems in score. Vols. I. 

and II. On the title-page of Vol. I. is written the name 
"James Nares"; on that of Vol. II. " Bern"*- Gates." 
Printed for and sold by John Walsh. Lent by the Corpora- 
tion of Manchester. From the Henry Watson Musical 
Library. 

1724. 

187. Geistliche Seelen Musik. — Seventh edition. Lent by Sir 

August Manns. 

1727. 

188. Eavenscroft, Thomas. — Conipleat collection of Psalm Tunes. 

Lent by T. L. Southgate. 

1730. 

189. Greene, Maurice, Doc. — Forty select Anthems in score. Two 

vols, in one. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1743. 

190. Lamentations of Job, with music. — Lent by Miss EJ A, 

Willmott. 

1764. 

191. Thompson, C. and S. — 50 Double and Single Chants. 

The most Favourite as performed at St. Paul's, West- 
minster, and most of the Cathedrals in England. Lent by 
Mr. T. S. Bumpus. 

c. 1769. 

192. Ayrton, Dr. Edmund. — Anthem. An original signed copy. 

Lent by Mr. John Westrope. 

1788. 

193. Hintz, Frederick. — A choice Collection of Psalm and Hymn 

Tunes set for the Cetra or Guitar. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. 
Hill. 

19 



Masses and Motetts. 

194. Senfl, Lud wig.— Liber selectarum cantionum quas vulgo 

Mutetas appellent sex quinque et quatuor vooum. Large 
folio. 

One of the earliest music books printed in Germany, 

containing a collection of works by H. Isaac, Josquin de 

Pres, P. de la Rue, Obrecht, and the editor Senfl. Lent 

by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

J Augsburg, 1520. 

195. Merulo, Claudio. — Missarum quinque vocum. Liber Primus 

(cantus, tenor, and bassus only). Lent by the Royal College 
of Music. 

Venice, 1573. 

196. Vittoria, T. L. — Missarvm Libri Duo quse partim qvaternis, 

partim qvinis, partim sexis, concinvntvr vocibus. Lent by 
Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

Roma, 1583. 

197. Palestrina, G.P. — Missarum cum quatuor, quinque ac sex 

vocibus. Liber Primus (Cantus et Altus parts). Lent by 
the Royal College of Music. 

Rome, 1591. 

198. Lasso, Orlando di. — Magnum opus musicum, complectens 

omnes cantiones quas Motetas vulgo vocant. Lent by 
Mr. J. E. Matthew. Folio, 6 vols. 

This great work owes its existence to the piety of the 
composer's sons Ferdinand and Rudolph. It is excellently 
printed in separate parts, and except that it is unbarred 
could be read from with ease. 

Munich, N, Henricus, 1604. 

199. Lasso, Orlando di. — Missas posthuma?, hactenus ineditse Lent 

by Mr. J. E. Matthew. Large folio. 

Edited by his son Rudolp, and printed apparently by 
the same type as that used by Adam Berg. 

Movoci, N. Henricus, 1610. 

200. Peerson Martin.— Mottets. Lent by Christ Church College, 

Oxford. 

1630. 

201. Bassani, Signior. — Harmonia Festiva. Being the Eighth 

Opera of Divine Mottetts. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

William Pearson. 

London, c. 1660. 

202. Porter, Walter.— Mottets of two Voyces for Treble or Tenor 

and Bass with, the Continued Bass or Score. To be per- 
formed to an Organ, Harpsycon, Lute or Bass Viol. Lent 
by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1657. 

20 



Operas, Oratorios, etc. 

203. Beaxyoyetdx, Balthasar. — Ballet Comique de la Reyne. 

Written for the marriage of the Due de Joyeuse with 
Marguerite de Vandemont de Lorraine, sister of the queen 
of Henry III. of France. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 
Le Roy, Ballard & Patisson, 

Paris, 1582. 

204. Peri, Jacops. — Le musiche sopra L'Euridice del Sig. Ottavio 

Rinuccini. Folio. 

The very rare first edition of the first opera published, 
written for the marriage of Henri IV. of France with 
Maria de Medici. It was reprinted in Venice in 1608, but 
this edition is also rare. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Fiorenza, 1600. 

205. Lock, II.— The English Opera ; or, the Vocal Musick in 

" Psyche," with the Instrumental therein intermixed ; to 
which is adjoyned the Instrumental Musick in " The 
Tempest." In full Score. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

London, 1675. 

206. Lock, Matthew. — The English Opera ; or, The Vocal Musick 

in Psyche, with the instrumental Therein Intermix'd. To 
which is Adjoined the Instrumental Musick in the Tempest. 
4to. 

The first opera performed and printed in England. The 
printer offers a quaint excuse : — " The Errata's in this 
Impression, which are not many, the Printer desires pardon 
for, it being his first attempt in this kind." Lent by Mr. 
J. E. Matthew. 

London, 1675. 

207. Purcell, Henry. — A Musical Entertainment performed on 

St. Cecilia's Day, 1683. Full Score. Lent by the Royal 
College of Music. 

London, 1681. 

208. Blow, John.— A Second Musical Entertainment performed on 

St. Cecilia's Day, 1684. In Score. Lent by the Royal 
College of Music. 

London, 1684. 

209. Purcell, Henry.— A Fool's Preferment ; or, The Three Dukes 

of Dunstable. A Comedy. Written by Mr. D'Urfey. 
Together with all the Songs and Notes to 'em. Lent by the 
Royal College of Music. 

London, 1688. 

210. Blow, John.— An Ode on the death of Mr. Henry Purcell. 

Full Score. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1696. 

211. Destouches Andre.— Tragedie Amadis de Grece. Ballard 

Score. Lent by Mr. William Saunders. 

1799. 



212. The Beggar's Opera.— Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

213. Handel, G. F— The Messiah (first printed score). The 

Messiah (the songs, first publication). Lent by Dr. W. H. 
Cummings. 

214. Dvorak, Antonill.— The Spectre's Bride. Vocal Score with 

composer's autograph. Lent by Mr. J. S. Shedlock. 

1886. 

215. Sullivan, Sir A.—" Golden Legend." Full Score with auto- 

graph. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

& P y 1896. 

Lute. 

216. Heckel, Wolf. — Lautten Buch, von mancherley schonen und 

lieblichen stucken, mit zweyten lautten zusammen zuschlagen, 
und auch sonst das mehrer theyl allein fur sich selbst. 

The music is a tablature differing from those used by 
English and Italian writers for the lute. Lent by the 
Royal College of Music. 

Strasbourg, 1562. 

Sonatas. 

217. Corelli, Arcangelo. — Parte Prima — Sonate a Violino e Violone, 

o Cimbalo, Opera Quinta Incisa da Gasparo Pietra Santa. 
Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

218. Fureell, H. — Twelve Sonatos of three parts, two violins and a 

bass, with MS. figured bass additions, probably by Purcell 
himself. Folio. Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

1683. 

219. Ravenscroft, Giovanni, alias Rederi Inglese. — Sonate a tre, 

doi Violini, e Violone, 6 Arcilento, col Basso perl'Organo; 
4to (four parts). 

Nine of these Sonatos were published at Amsterdam 
under the name of Corelli. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

In Roma, 1695. 

220. Purcell, H. — Ten Sonatas in four parts. Lent by Sir Frederick 

Bridge. 

1697. 

221. Leclair, J. M. — Sonatas for Violin. Two vols, in one. Lent 

by Mr. Sigmund Beel. 

1723. 

222. Tartini Giuseppe. — Six sonatas. Op. secunda, with portrait. 

Lent by Mr. Sigmund Beel. 

1745. 

223. Nardini Pietro. — Six sonatas with portrait. Lent by Sigmund 

Beel. 

224. Beethoven.— Sonata in A Flat. Op. 26 Facsimile Lent by 

Mr. J. S. Shedlock. J 

22 



Lessons, Suites, etc. 

225. Holbome— Pavans. Lent by Christ Church College, Oxford. 

1599. 

226. Negri Cesare— Nuove Inventioni di Balli. Lent by Mr. Alfred 

Littleton. 

Girolamo Bordone. 

Milan, 1604. 

227. Frescobaldi Girolamo.— Toccate e Partite D'Intavolatura di 

Cimbalo. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

Nicolo Borboni. 

Rome, 1615. 

228. Gibbons, Orlando— Fantazies of Three Parts (for Viols). In 

separate parts engraved on copper plates. Lent by the 
Royal College of Music. 

London. 

229. Este Michael.— The Seventh Set of Bookes. Wherein are 

Duos for two Baes Viols ; also Fancies of three and four 
parts. In separate parts bound together. Lent, by the 
Royal College of Music. 

London, 1638. 

230. Byrd, William, Bull, Dr. John, and Gibbons— Orlando.— 

Parthenia. Engraved by W. Hole. Lent by Mr. Alfred 
Litileton. 

London, 1655. 

231. Musick's Eecreation on the Lyra Viol. — Being a choice 

collection of New and Excellent Lessons for the Lyrs Viol. 
. . . . to which is added some few Directions as a Guide 
for Beginners. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 
Printed for John Playford. 

London, 1656 ?. 

232. Locke Matthew. — His Little Consort of Three Parts, con- 

taining Pavins, Ayres, Corants and Sarabands, for Viols or 
Violins. In parts (in a case). Lent by the Royal College of 
Music. 

London, 1656. 

233. Playford, John — Musick's Delight on the Cithren. Lent by 

Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

Printed by W. G., and are sold by J. Playford, at his 
shop in the Temple. Extremely rare. In it are set forth 
" Lessons Al a Mode, being the choicest of our late new 
Ayres, Corants, Sarabands, Tunes.and Jiggs 

London, 1666 

234. Locke, M. — Melothesia : or, Certain General Rules for playing 

upon a Continued Bass. With a choice Collection of Lessons 
for the Harpsicord and Organ of all sorts. The First Part. 
Lent by J. E. Matthew. 

London, 1673. 

23 



235. Marais, M.— Pieces a une et a deux Violes. Chez L Autheur 

Rue du jour proche St. Eustache du coste de la rue Mont- 
martre and Jean Hurel faiseurd' Instruments pour la musique 
du Roi. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. , 

J Paris, 1686. 

236. Matteis, Nicola— Ayres For the Violin. Third and fourth 

parts. Lent by Mr. Herbert Thompson. 

' 1687 and 1685. 

237. Froherger. J. J.— Diverse . . . Toccate. Lent by Mr. 

J. E. Matthew. 

1693. 

238. Purcell, H.— A Choice Collection of Lessons for the Harpsi- 

chord or Spinnet. Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

239. Blow, John, and Henry Purcell. — A choice Collection of 

Lessons, being excellently Sett to the Harpsichord. 

London, 1705. 

240. Blow, John. — A choice Collection of Lessons for the Harpsi- " 

chord, Spinnet, etc. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London (n.d.j, 1698. 
[239 and 240 are bound together in one volume.] 

241. Harpsichord Master (The Second Book of the), containing a 

choice Collection of Lessons for the Harpsichord or Spinnet, 
by Dr. Blow, etc. 

London, 1700. 

The Third Book — the Lessons, etc. — by Mr. Jer. Clark, 
etc. At the end of the book is added " Plain and Easy 
Rules for Learners made by the late famous Mr. Hen. 
Purcell." Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1702. 

242. Division Violin (The), containing a Collection of Divisions 

upon several Excellent Grounds for the Violin. Two parts. 
(The first part, the 6th edition ; the second part, the 4th 
edition.) Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London (n.d.) circa. 1705-10. 

243. Greene, Dr. Maurice. — Choice Lessons for the Harpsichord 

and Spinet. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

244. Muffat, Georg. — Componimenti musicali. Lent by Mr. J. E. 

Matthew. 

Vienna, 1727. 

245. Scarlatti, Domenico. — Essercizi per Gravicembalo, dedicated 

Alia Sacra Real Maesta di Giovani V. II Giusto, Re di 
Portugallo. Obi. fol., published at Venice cir. 1730. Lent 
by the Corporation of Manchester. From the Henry Watson 
Musical Library. 

246. Eosingrave, T. — Thesaurus Musicus Suits and Lessons for the 

Harpsichord and Spinet. Lent bj Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

24 



247. Rameau, J. P.— Pieces de Clavecin. Lent by Mr. J. E. 

Matthew. 1741. 

248. Musica Bellicosa; or, Warlike Music— Being a choice Col- 

lection of sixty-eight Marches and Trumpet Tunes for the 
German Flute, Violin, and Hautboy, with a Thorough Bass. 
Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

Published by Walsh, 

London. 

249. Rutherford, D — The Art of Playing on the Violin, with "A 

Collection of ye most favourite Airs," and " Some agreable 
Lessons in two Parts for ye Improvement of Young Gentle- 
men." Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 



Songs. 

Song Books from the Collection of the late Sir JOHN STAINER. 
(Lent by Mr. J. F. R. Stainer. 

250. Law es (Henry). — Ayres and Dialogues. Bk. I. Folio. 1653. 

251. Select Ayres and Dialogues. Folio. 1659. 

252. Rump Songs. Svo. 1662. 

253. Choice Ayres. Bk. I. Folio. 1676. 

254. The Theater of Music. Folio. 1685. 

255. The Banquet of Music. Bk. I. Folio. 1688. 

256. Thesaurus Musicus. Bk. I. Folio. 1693. 

257. Loyal Songs. i2mo. 1694. 

258. Deliciae Musics. Folio. 1696. 

259. The Monthly Masks of Vocal Music. Folio. 1704. 

260. Reading (John). — A Book of New Songs. Folio, c. 1720. 

261. Diamonds cut Diamonds. 52 new songs by Henry Carey. 

i2mo. c. 1720. 

262. A Pocket Companion for Gentlemen and Ladies. 2 vols. 

8vo. c. Y12b. 

263. Leveridge (R.).— A Collection of Songs. 4to. 1727. 

264. The British Musical Miscellany. Vol. I. 4to. 1735. 

265. The Universal Musician, or Songster's Delight. Vol. I. 

8vo. 1738. 

266. Carey (Henry).— The Musical Century. Folio. 1740. 

267. Universal Harmony. 4t°- 1745. 

268. Calliope, or English Harmony. Vol. II. Svo. 1745. 

25 



239. Amaryllis. 4to. 1746. 

270. The Muses Banquet, or a Present from Parnassus.— Reading. 

i2mo. 1752. 

271. Clio and Euterpe, or British Harmony. Vol.11. 8vo. 1762. 

272. The Muses Delight, or the London Polite Songster. i2mo. 

1766. 

273. The Masque. i2mo. 1770. 

274. The London Songster, or Polite Musical Companion. i2mo. 

1774. 

275. The Robin, or the Ladies' Polite Songster. i2mo. 1775. 

276. The Goldfinch, or New Modern Songster.— Edinburgh. 

i2mo. 1782. 

277. The Vocal Enchantress. 12 mo. 1783. 

27S. The New Olio, or A Collection of Choice Whims. i2mo. 
c 1790. 

279. Monstrous Good Songs for the year 1794. . i2mo. 

280. Tegg's New London Fashionable Songster for the Spring 

of 1606. l2mo. 

231. 1 he Entertaining and Amusing Song-Book for 1S09. i2mo. 

232. The London Fashionable Melodist. i2mo. 1317. 

233. Tegg's Comic Song Book. i2mo. 1819. 

234. Fairburn's Larking Songster for 1823. i2mo. 

285. Fairburn's Everlasting Songster. Vol. I. i2mo. c. 1825. 

236. Fairburn's Wonderful Songster for 1829. i2mo. 

287. Fairburn's Annual Songster for 1837. i2mo. 

238. Lord Tomnoddy's Comic Songster. i2mo. c 1840. 

289. Prudentius. — Melodiae Prvdentianae et in virgilivm magna ex 

parte nvper natae, et per Nicolaum Fabrum typographum 
expressae. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

Lipsiae, 1533. 

290. Whythorne, T. — Songs. Lent by Christ Church College, 

Oxford. 

1571. 

291. Byrd, William. — Songs of sundrie natures : some of gravitie, 

and others of myrth. (_Six parts.) Lent by Mr. Alfred 
Littleton. 

Thomas East. 

London, 15S9. 

292. Morley, T. — Canzonets, or little short Songs to three voyces. 

Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1593. 

26 



293. Mundy, John^-Songs and Psalms. Lent by Christ Church 

College, Oxford. 

1591 

294. Morley, Thomas.— The First Booke of Ballets to Five Voyces 

In separate parts, bound together. Lent by the Royal 
College of Music. J 

London, 1595. 

295. Morley, T.— Canzonets, or little short Airs to Five and Six 

Voyces. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1597. 

296. Dowland, J.— Second Book of Songs or Ayres. Lent by Dr. 

W. H. Cummings. 

1600. 

297. Dowland, John.— The Third and last Booke of Songs or Aires. 

Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1603. 

298. PilMngton, Francis— The First Booke of Songs or Ayres of 

four parts, with Tableture for the Lute or Orpherian, with 
the Violl de Gamba. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

London, 1605. 

299. Danyel, I.— Songs for the Lute Viol and Voice. Lent by Mr 

G. E. P. Arkwright. 

London, 1606. 

300. Coprario, John.— Funeral Teares, for the death of the Right 

Honorable the Earle of Devonshire. Figured In Seaven 
Songes. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

London, 1606. 

301. Ferrabosco Alfonso.— Ayres. Autograph of the Author on 

title-page. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1609. 

302. Eavenscroft, Thomas. — Pammelia. Musickes miscellanie. 

Catches of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 parts in one. Lent by the 
Royal College of Music. 

London, 1609. 

303. Eavenscroft, Thomas. — Deuteromelia ; or, the Second part of 

Musick's melodie, or melodious Musicke. Of pleasant 
Roundalaies; K.H. Mirth or Freemen's Songs. And such 
delightful Catches. 4to. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

London, 1609. 

304. Dowland, Robert. — A Musicall Banquet, furnished with varietie 

of delicious Ayres, collected out of the best Authors in 
English, French, Spanish, and Italian. By Robert Dowland, 
son of the celebrated John Dowland. Folio. Lent by Mr. 
J. E. Matthew. 

London, 1610. 

£05. Corkine, William. — Ayres. Lent by Glasgow and West of 
Scotland Technical College. 

1610. 

27 



306. Adson, John.— Courtly Masquing Ayres. Lent by Christ 

Church College, Oxford. 

London, 1611. 

307. Dowland, John.— First Booke of Songs. Lent by Christ 

Church College, Oxford. 

1613. 

308. Coprario, John. — Songs of Mourning : Bewailing the untimely 

Death of Prince Henry. Worded by Tho. Campion. 1 
Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

London, 1613. 

309. Tomkins.T. — Songs of three, four, five and six parts. Cantus. 

Lent by the Corporation of Manchester. From the Henry 
Watson Musical Library. 

London, 1622. 

310. Hilton, John. — Ayres or Fa Las. Lent by Christ Church 

College, Oxford. 

1627. 

311. Filmer, Ed. — Court Ayres. Lent by Christ Church College, 

Oxford. 

1629. 

312. Hilton, John. — Catch that Catch can ; or, A choice Collection 

of Catches, Rounds and Canons for three or four Voyces. 
Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1652. 

313. Select Musical Ayres and Dialogues for One and Two 

Voyces to sing to the Theorbo Lute or Basse Violl. Composed 
by John Wilson, Charles Colman, Doctours of Musick; 
Henry Lawes, William Webb, Gentlemen. Also some few 
short Ayres or Songs, for Three Voyces to an Instrument ; 
and "The Second Booke of Ayres. Composed by many 
excellent Masters in M us 'ck now living." Lent by the Royal 
College of Music. 

London, 1652. 

314. Playford. — Select Musicall Ayres and Dialogues. Lent by Mr. 

John Charrington. 

1653. 

315. Lawes, Henry. — Ayres and Dialogues for One, Two, and Three 

Voices. Three Books. Portrait on titles of the first and 
second books. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1653-55-69. 

316. Courtly Masquing Ayres.— Composed by several excellent 

Masters : Colman, Dr. in Musick, Lawes, Jenkins, Lock, 
etc. Two parts bound together. Lent by the Royal College 
of Music. 

London, 1662. 

317. Forbes, John. — Songs and Fancies, Cantus, 2nd Edition. Lent 

by the Corporation of Manchester. From the Henry Watson 
Musical Library. 

1666. 

28 



318. King, William.— Poems by Mr. Cowley and others, composed 

into Songs and Ayres, with a Thorough Basse to the Theorbo, 
Harpsicon or Basse Violl. Lent by the Royal College of 
Music. } s 

Oxford, 1668. 

319. Lawes, Henry. — The Treasury of Musick. Containing Ayres 

and Dialogues to sing to the Theorbo, Lute or Basse Viol. 
In Three Books. Printed by William Goodbid for John 
Playford, and are to be sold at his Shop in the Temple, near 
the Church Dore. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1669. 

320. Choice Ayres, Songs, and Dialogues.— Book I. Containing 

the rare separately-paged sheet entitled, " The Ariel's Songs 
in the Play call'd The Tempest" [by Banister and Pelham 
Humphreys] inserted. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1676. 

321. Purcell, Daniel. The Single Songs with the Dialogue in the 

New Opera, Brutus of Alba, or Augusta's Triumph. Lent 
by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1696. 

322. Purcell, H. — A collection of Ayres composed for the Theatre. 

Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

1697. 

323. Purcell, H.— Orpheus Britannicus Two vols. Lent by 

Mr. Herbert Thompson. 

1698 and 1702. 

324 Blow, John, Mus.Doc— Amphion Anglicus. Folio. Lent 

by J. E. Matthew. 

A collection of Lays published by subscription by the 
famous organist of Westminster Abbey. 

London, 1700. 

325 Ariosti, A. — Cantatas and Lessons. Alia Maesta Di Giorgio 

Re Delia Gran Britagna. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

326. Purcell, Daniel. — Six Cantatas for a Voice, with a Through 

Bass, two of which are accompanied with a violin. Compos'd 
after the Italian Manner. With Preface. Lent by Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill. 

327. Carey, Henry. — The Musical Century in One Hundred English 

Ballads. Words and Music of the whole. Vol. I., con- 
taining the first fifty. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

328. Dr. Haydn's VI. Original Canzonettas for the Voice, with an 

Accompaniment for the Piano-forte. Dedicated to Mrs. John 
Hunter. With Engraved Portrait "d'apres le Tableau 
Original appartenant au Prince Estherazy." Lent by Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill. 

329. Haydn, J. — Old copy of his Canzonettas, with Composer's 

signature. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

330. Amarillis. — English Songs (Engraved Vignettes). Lent by 

Miss E. A. Willmott. 

29 



Madrigals. 

331. Eore. Capriano— II primo libro delle Fiamme yoghi et Dilette- 

voli Madrigali, a quattro et a cinque voci. Vineggia L'herede 
di Girolamo Scotio. 4 to. (5 parts). Lent by Mr. J. E. 
Matthew. 

1576. 

332. Marenzio, Luca — II primo Libro de Madrigali, a cinque voci. 

In separate parts, bound together. Lent by the Royal College 
of Music. 

Venice, 1586. 

333. Vecchi, Horatio. — Madrigali a cinque voci. Libro Primo. In 

separate parts bound together. Lent by the Royal College 
of Music. 

Venice, 1589. 

334. Watson, Thomas. — The first sett of Italian Madrigalls | 

Englished, not to the sense of the originall dittie, but after the 
affection of the Noate. (6 parts.) Lent by Mr. Alfred ' 
Littleton. 

Thomas East, 

London, 1590. 

335. Waelrent, Huberto. — Symphonia Angelica di diversi excel- 

lentissimi Musici a III., V., et VI. voci, nuovamente raccolta 
per Huberto Waelrent et data in luce. In separate parts in 
case. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

Antwerp, 1590. 

336. Marenzio, Luca.— II sesto Libro de Madrigali a Sei Voci. 

4to. (6 parts.) Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Gardano. 

Veneiia, 1595. 

337- Croce, Chiozzotto (Giovanni). — Madrigali a cinque voci. In 
separate parts, bound together. Lent by the Royal College 
of Music. 

Venice, 1595. 

338. Philips, Pietro. — II Primo Libro De Madrigali a sei voci. In 

Anversa. Nella Stamperia di Pietro Phalesio. Lent by 
Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

1596. 

339. Weelkes, T.— Madrigals. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1597. 

340. Kirfcy, (J — Madrigals. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1597. 

341. Yonnge, N— A Collection of Madrigalles. For five and six 

voices. The six part books. Lent by Sir August Manns. 
Published by Thomas Este. 

1597. 

an 



342. Weelkes, Thomas. — Madrigals for five voices. Lent by Mr. 

Lionel Benson. 

1598. 

343. Wilbye, John.— The First Set of English Madrigals to three, 

four, five and six voices. In separate parts, bound together. 
Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1598. 

314. Farmer, John. — The First Set of English Madrigals To Foure 
Voices. The composer published no further madrigals. 
Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

1599. 

345. Morley, Thomas. — Madrigals to Four Voices. Lent by the 

Corporation of Manchester. From the Henry Watson Musical 
Library. 

1600. 

346. Morley, Thomas. — Madrigales. The Triumphes of Oriana, to 

five and six voyces, composed by divers several Authors. 
In separate parts, bound together. Lent by the Royal 
College of Music. 

London, 1601. 

347. Morley, T. — Triumphs of Oriana. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson, 

1601. 

348. Carlton Richard, Priest. — Madrigals to Five Voyces. The 

Tenor part. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1601. 

349. Este, Michael. — Madrigals. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1604. 

350. Bateson, Thomas. — ist and 2nd Sets of Madrigals. Lent by 

Christ Church College, Oxford. 

1604 and 1618. 

351. Este, Michael. — The Second Sets of Madrigales to 3, 4, and 

5 parts : apt for Viols and Voices. In separate parts, bound 
together. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

London, 1606. 

352. Wilbye, J. — Second Set of Madrigals. Lent by Mr. Lionel 

Benson. 

London, 1609. 

353 Ravenscroft, J. — Meliowata. Musicall Phansies Fitting the 
Court, Citie, and Countrey Humours. To 3, 4, and 5 voyces. 
4to. Contains the Carol " Remember, O thou Man," the 
melody of which resembles " God save the King." Lent by 
Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

London, 1611. 

354. Gibbons, Orlando.— The First Set of Mottets of Five Parts 
apt for Viols and Voyces. Lent by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

London, 1612. 

31 



355. Lichfield, Henry.— The First Set of Madrigals of Five Parts; 

apt both for Viols and Voyces. Lent by the Corporation of 
Manchester. From the Henry Watson Musical Library. 

Cantus. 

London, 1613. 

356. Pilkington, Francis.— The First Set of Madrigals and 

Pastorals of three, four and five Parts. Lent by the Corpora- 
tion of Manchester. From the Henry Watson Musical 
Library. 

Cantus. 

London, 1613. 

357. Ward, John. — The first set of English Madrigals to three, four, 

five and six Parts ; apt both for Viols and Voyces. Lent by 
Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

Thomas Snodham. 

London, 1613. 

358. Jffionteverde, Claudio. — II Quinto Libro de Madrigali a Cinque 

Voci. Five Parts. Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Gardano. 

Venetia, 1620. 

359. Monteverde, Claudio. — II primo Libro de Madrigali a cinque 

voci. 4to. (5 Parts). Lent by Mr. J. E. Matthew. 

Gardano. 

Venetia, 1621. 

360. Pilkington, Francis. — The Second Set of Madrigals, and 

Pastorals, of 3, 4, 5, and 6 Parts ; Apt for Violls and Voyces. 
Lent by the Corporation of Manchester. From the Henry 
Watson Musical Library. 

Quintus, 

London, 1624. 

361. Archadelt, Jacques. — II primo Libro de Madrigali a Qualtro 

Voci. In Bracciano, par Andrea Fei. 4to. (4 Parts. ) A late 
edition of this work. Lent by Mr. T. E. Matthew. 

1643. 

Miscellaneous. 

362. Alison, Richard. — An Houre's Recreation in Musicke. Lent by 

Mr. Lionel, Benson. 

1606. 

363. Ford, Thomas.— Musicke of Sundrie Kindes. Lent by the 

Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College. 

1607. 

364. Jones, Robert. — A Musicall Dreame. Lent by the Glasgow 

and West of Scotland Technical College. 

1609. 

32 



365 Campion, Thomas. — The Description of a Maske : Presented in 
the Banqueting- roome at Whitehall, on Saint Stephens night 
last, At the Marriage of the Right Honourable the Earle of 
Somerset : And the right noble the lady Frances Howard, 
various Ayres compaoed for the Maske are annexed. Lent 
by Mr. G. E. P. Arkwright. 

London, 1614. 

365. Rimhault, E. F. — Musical Illustrations of Bishop Percy's 
Reliques of Ancient English Poetry. Lent by Mr. T. L. 
Southgate. 

1850. 

367. H.R.H. The Prince Consort: Collected compositions. Pre- 

sentation copy to Sir Michael Costa with Queen Victoria's 
autograph. Lent by Madame Costa. 

368. Cooper, George. — Organ book with the Bach music. Lent by 

Miss E. A. Willmott. 




33 



Manuscripts. 
1 2th to 13th Century. 

PREFACE. 

The Manuscripts brought together in this Section 
serve to illustrate the development of musical notation 
from the twelfth century down to the present day. 

Before the introduction of staves and clefs, 
melodies were noted down in curious little strokes and 
figures known as neumes, which served roughly to 
indicate pitch and phrasing. Of these we have an 
example in the Roman Missal lent by Mr. Arkwright. 

A good example of two-part harmony, written 
about 1300 A.D., will be seen in the earlier of the two 
Manuscripts lent by the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

Next in order of date comes the remarkable 
Manuscript which formerly belonged to John Stafford 
Smith, and has only recently again been brought to 
light at St. Edmund's College, Old Hall. It contains 
a number of elaborate compositions by English 
musicians of the first half of the fifteenth century, 
including a setting in four parts of the hymn " Veni 
Sancte Spiritus " by John Dunstable. 

About a century later we have a fine specimen 
of the music books of the time of Henry VIII. in the 
folio Manuscript from Eton College, containing com- 
positions by Robert Fayrfax and his contemporaries. 

Our collection is peculiarly rich in Manuscript 
music books for the virginals and late of the Eliza- 
bethan period. For the virginals we have the 
well-known books of Will. Forster and Benjamin 
Cosyn from Buckingham Palace, and of Lady Neville 
from Eridge Castle ; for the late William Ballet's book 
from Trinity College, Dublin, in which the earliest 

35 



versions of many of our old English tunes, such as 
"Greensleeves" and " Turkeyloney," are preserved. 
For the benefit of those who are not familiar with lute 
notation or " tablatr.re " it may be explained that the 
lines here are not the lines of the stave, but represent 
the six strings of the instrument. The letters show 
which of the eight frets on the neck are to be "stopped" 
with the left hand, and the symbols above indicate the 
length of the notes. 

Music-writing under the Commonwealth is illus- 
trated by the original Manuscript of Henry Lawes' 
music to Milton's " Comus," and by the music book 
of Anne Cromwell, first cousin of the Protector. 

Several specimens of Henry Purcell's writing are 
here, including the noble volume of Anthems and 
Odes lent by His Majesty the King ; and Handel is 
well represented by the autograph Manuscript of " The 
Messiah" from Buckingham Palace, as well as the 
Dublin score from Tenbury and what is known as 
Handel's working score from Mr. Otto Goldschmidt's 
library. 

J. F. R. STAINER. 



Manuscripts. 



THE MESSIAH, Handel's Autograph Score. Lent by His 
Majesty the King. 

369. Graduale secundum usum Ecclesise Romans, cum notis 

musipis. MS. of the I2th century, on vellum, capitals in red, 
the music written in Neumes. Lent by Mr. G. E. Arkwright. 

370. Five leaves from an English Graduale.—" The Litany of St. 

John," parchment, illuminated capitals. Lent by Mr. T. L. 
Southgate. 

371- English Hymn to the Virgin (" Edi beo thu heuene queene ") 
with music in two parfs on a single stave, written about 1270 
a.d. Photograph of MS., Corpus Christi College, Oxford. 
Lent by Corpus Christi College, Oxford. 

372. Hymn, with two-part harmony, written about 1300 a.d. Lam- 

beth Palace MS. 457. Lent by the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

373. " The Old Hall MS." containing nearly one hundred com- 

positons by named English musicians, cir. 1450. It is con- 
jectured that it may have been written under the direction of 
Nicholas Sturgeon, Canon of Windsor, who died c. 1454. 
Lent by Rev. Bernard Wood. 

374. Lady Nevill's Book — MS. book of Virginal music. Containing 

music by William Byrd (1591). Lent by Marquess of 
Abergavenny. 

374a. Will Porster's Virginal Book (1624). Lent by His Majesty 
the King. 

374b. Benjamin Cosyn's Virginal Book. Lent by His Majesty the 
King. 

375. Treatises (musical) of 16th Century, by Chelle, Otteley, 

etc., and a musical puzzle by Dunstable, hitherto unsolved. 
Lent by the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

376. MS. Anthem Book (16th Century). Lent by Provost and 

Fellows of Eton. 

377. William — MS. Lent by Trinity College Dublin. 

■cir. 1600. 

378. Cromwell, Annie, first cousin of Oliver Cromwell.— Her 

original Manuscript Book, containing a great number of 
pieces. In original calf binding, gilt, with claspes, and the 
initials "A. C." stamped on both sides. Lent by. Sir Richard 
Tangye. 

378a. Purcell, Henry. — Volume of Anthems and Odes in the com- 
poser's handwriting. Lent by His Majesty the King. 

37 



379. Manuscript Book.— Tunes for the treble violin and hautboy. 

Collected by I. S. for his own use. The tunes are 1,299 m 
number. Lent by Mr. Herbert Thompson. 

Begun in the year of our Lord 1695. 

380. Manuscript Volume of Scotch Tunes, etc Lent by Madame 

Costa. 

381. Oblong Book of MS. Organ Voluntaries by English Composers 

of the XVIIIth century, made for the King's Organist at the 
Chapel Royal. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

Lute Music. 

382. Book of Lute Music. Lent by Major Bevil Granville. 

383. MS. Old Book of Lute Music in English tablature, probably 

compiled for one of the Rookwood family, of Coldham Hall. 
Lent by Mr. J. Wood. 

cir. 1659. 

384. Lute Book. — Ballet. Lent by Trinity College, Dublin. 

British Composers. 

385. Taverner. — Hugh Aston and others. 16th century part books 

containing masses, etc. Lent by Christ Church College, 
Oxford. 

386. Jenkins, John. — Autograph, MS. Dialogue between Body 

and Soul. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

387 Lawes, Henry. — Music to Milton's " Comus " (autograph), 
each page bearing the composer's name. Lent by Dr. M. R. 
Cooper Smith. 

388. Lawes, William. — Autograph Music for the Lyra Viol. Lent 

by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

389. Rogers, Dr. Benjamin.— Setting of the Magdalen College 

Grace (this is the hymn which is still sung annually at sunrise 
on the 1st of May on the roof of Magdalen College Tower). 
Lent by Christ Church College, Oxford. 

390. Locke, Matthew. — Autograph. Music for Sagbutts and 

Cornets (Charles the 2nd's copy). Lent by Dr. W. H. 
Cummings. 

391. Blow, Dr. John. — Autograph score of unpublished Anthem, 

" O be joyful in God." Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

392 Purcell, Henry.— Autograph MS. of the Yorkshire Feast 
Song. Lent by W. H. Cummings. 

393. Purcell, Henry.— Opera " The Fairy Queen." (1693.) 

Theatre score containing many pages in the composer's 
autograph. Lent by the Royal Academy of Music. 

38 



394. Purcell, Henry. — Volume of MS. music containing the only 

known copy of his Violin Sonata. Lent by Mr. T. W. 
Taphouse. 

395. Purcell, Henry. — MS. book of vocal music, chiefly composed 

and written by him. Lent by Mr. G. L. Southgate. 

396. Purcell, Henry. — Te Deum for voices and instruments. Auto- 

graph score. Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

397. Croft, Dr. W. — Autograph score of Morning and Evening 

Service in E flat. (1718.) Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

398. Croft, William.— Autograph MS. Voluntaries. Lent by Dr. 

W. H. Cummings. 

399. Croft, William. — Te Deum (in D), for voices and instruments. 

In full score, in the composer's autograph. Lent by the 
Royal College of Music. 

400. Greene, Maurice. — Autograph ' MS. Anthem, " O clap your 

hnnds." Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

401. Greene, Maurice. — Te Deum (in D major) for voices and instru- 

ments. In full score, with autograph of the composer. Lent 
by the Royal College of Music. 

402. Boyce, Dr. William. — Autograph MS. of " Solomon." Lent 

by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

403. Boyce, William. — The Morning Service [Te Deum and 

Jubilate] in A, which is printed with the twelve anthems 
published by his widow in 1790. In score, in the composer's 
autograph. Lent by the Royal College of Music. 

404. Manuscript of Elliott's "Light Dragoons' March." (now 

15th Hussars), for 2 Corneis, 2 Horns, and 2 Bassi (1767). 
Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

405. Arne, T. A. — Autograph. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

406. Bishop, Sir Henry. — Autograph MS., " Departure from 

Paradise." Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

407. Bishop, Sir Henry. — Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

408. Hayes, Dr. Philip. — Volume in composer's handwriting, con- 

taining his Anthem, " The Lord descended from above." 
Nov. 10, 1769. Lent by Mr. John S. Bumpus. 

409. Wesley, Samuel.— MS. of Glee, " The Rights of Man," also 

sheet of Anthem, " Death's Final Conquest." Lent by 
Mr. J. E. Street (i799>- 

410. Cooke, T. — Extract from Song.- Lent by Hon. Mrs. C. R. 

Spencer. 

411. Crotch, Dr. W. — Commentary on the Psalms of David (auto- 

graph). Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

39 



412. Crotch, Dr. W— Improvement on " Non Nobis." Lent by 

Miss E. A. Willmott. 

413. Potter, Cipriani.— Album Leaf, "Eine Grille" (autograph). 

Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

414. Potter, Cipriani. — Overture to "The Tempest," autograph 

MS., 1835. Lent by the Philharmonic Society. 

415. Horsley, W— " Hallelujah." Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

416. Goss, Sir J.— Double Chant in A flat. Lent by Mr. J. S. 

Bumpus. 

417. Goss, Sir John.— MS. of Anthem " God so loved." Lent by 

Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

418. Goss, Sir John. — Book of MS. music (compositions and 

sketches). Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

419. Macfarren, Sir G. A,— Cantata, " May Day." Lent by the 

Royal Academy. 

420. Field, John.— Autograph MS. Concerto. Lent by Dr. W. H. 

Cummings. 

421 Field, John. — Interesting fragment composed at the age of 12. 
Auto. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

422. Bennett, Sir Stemdale. — Capricefor pianoforte and orchestra. 

Lent by the Royal Academy of Music. 

423. Stainer, Sir John. — Two hymn tunes. Auto. Lent by Mr. 

Henry King. 

424. Stainer, Sir John.— Autograph MS. of "The Crucifixion." 

■Lent by Lady itainer. 

425. Sullivan, Arthur. — Original manuscript of " The Lost Chord," 

composed January 13th, 1877. Lent by Mrs. M. F. Ronalds. 

426. Sullivan, Sir A.—" The Mikado," full score. Lent by the 

Royal Academy of Music. 

427. Sullivan, Sir Arthur. — Ivanhoe. (Auto, full score). Lent by 

Mr. iHerbert Sullivan. 

428. Sullivan, Sir Arthur.— Overture di Ballo. (Auto, full score.) 

Lent by Mr. Herbert Sullivan. 

429. Sullivan, Sir Arthur.— MS. of first song, " O Israel." Plates 

destroyed. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

430. Sullivan, Sir A.— MS. of Song, " The Lost Chord." Lent by 

Mrs. Ronalds. 

431. Sullivan, Sir Arthur S— Concerto in D major for Violoncello, 

composed expressly for and dedicated to Signor Alfredo 
Piatti (Auto, of score dated London, 20th Nov., 1866). Lent 
by Mr. Herbert Sullivan. 

40 



432. Sullivan, Arthur S. — An Idyll for the Violoncello, composed 

for and dedicated to his friend, Col. P. Paget, Farnham. 
Auto. 31st July, 1865. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

433. Sullivan, Sir Arthur.— Original MS. of " The Absent-Minded 

Beggar." Arranged as March for Pianoforte. Lent by 
Messrs. Enoch & Sons. 

434. Dykes, Dr. J. B.— Three Hymn Tunes (Auto.) Lent by E. C. 

Dykes. 

435. Elgar, Dr.— Libretto of the Apostles. Lent by Earl Howe 

G.C.B. 



Foreign Composers. 

436. Scarlatti, Alessandro. — Toccate per Cembalo, Primo Maestro 

della Real Cappella di Napoli (manuscript). The volume 
also contains Fugues for organ. Lent by Mr. H. M. Higgs. 

437. Scarlatti, Alessandro. — Cantata a 12: Soprano e Basso 

" Dorindo e Fileno." On last leaf is written " Anastasia 
Robinson. Auto. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

438. Scarlatti.— Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

439. Bach.— A Toccata in B. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

440. Bach, J. S. — Prelude and Fugue in G, from second part of the 

Well - Tempered Clavier. Auto. Lent by Mr. Alfred 
Morten. 

441. Bach, C. P. E. — Six Sonates pour le Clavecin ou Piano Forte, 

Accompagnees du Violon et Violoncelle. MS. Pf. part 
only. Lent by Mr. H. M. Higgs. 

442. Bach, J, S. — Auto music for first cello with Chorale. Lent by 

Mr. W. Westley Manning. 

443. Bach. — Continuo part of a Church Cantata. Auto. Lent by 

Mr. Stuart M. Samuel, M.P. 

444 Bach. — Autograph. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

446. Handel, Gt. P. — Trio, "Se tu non lasci amor.", Autograph 

signed " 12 Luglio, 1708, Napoli." Lent by Major Bevil 
Granville. 

447. Handel, G. P. — " Muzio Scevola," Handel's theatre score. 

Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

448. Handel, G. P. — Esther, an Oratorio set to Musick for James, 

Duke of Chandos, by George Frederick Handel. It belonged 
to Thomas Bever, LL.D., whose coat of arms is inside the 
cover, together with a note to the effect in his handwriting 
that he purchased it at the sale of music of the late Dr. Wm. 
Boyce, April 15th, for the sum of £5 us. 6d. The volume 
evidently belonged to the library of the Duke of Chandos. 
Lent by Mr. H. M. Higgs. 

41 

D 2 



449. Handel, G. ¥.— Facsimile of pages of "The Messiah" and 
" Israel in Egypt," in Album. Lent by Madame Costa. 

450 Handel, G. P.— Score of the " Messiah," mainly in Chr. Smith's 
handwriting, but with some parts in Handel's auto. Lent by 
St. Michael's College, Tenbury. 

451. Handel, G. P.— " Messiah," full score in the handwriting of 

composer's pupil and amanuensis, J. C. Smith. Lent by Mr. 
Otto Goldschmidt. 

452. Handel, G. P.— MS. volume from the Duke of Chandos's 

Library. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

453. Handel, G. P.— Libretto of " Theodora" in auto, of Dr. Morell, 

with Handel's auto. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

454. Handel, G. P.— Song from " Theodora." Lent by Dr. W. H. 

Cummings. 

455. Haydn, J.— Two Symphonies dated London, 1791. Auto. MSS. 

Lent by the Philharmonic Society. 

456. Haydn, Joseph.— Andante from the Surprise Symphony. Full 

score. Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

457. Haydn, Joseph.— Autograph quartet. Lent by the Royal 

College of Music. 

458. Haydn, J. — Fragment signed by the Composer. Lent by Mr. 

G. Donaldson. 

459. Gluck.— Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

460. Mozart, Leopold.— Musikalische Schlittenfahrt. Drum part. 

Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

461. Mozart. — Two lines with signature, dated May 2nd, 1786. 

Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

462. Mozart. — Autographs of pf. Duets. Sonatas in F and C. 

(1786-1787). Lent by Mr. J. E. Street. 

463. Mozart, W. A. — Original Song in Composer's handwriting, 

dated March 26th, 1787. Lent by the Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

464. Mozart, W. A. — Two pieces. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

465. Mozart. — Anthem, "God is our refuge and strength." Facsimile 

of autograph presented by the composer to the British 
Museum in 1765 when he was nine years old. Lent by Sir 
Frederick Bridge. 

466. Mozart. W. A. — Divertimento (Kochel 188), Serenade (Kochel 

239), and various Marches. Full scores all in composer's 
handwriting. Lent by Cavaliere Alberto Randegger. 

467. Mozart, W. A. — -Beginning of a Trio in g for Violin, Viola 

and Violoncella — 100 bars, the first part (91 bars) is 
complete (Auto.) Lent by Dr. C. Steggall, 

468. Mozart, W. A. — Autograph music and portrait. Lent by Mr. 

Alfred Morten. 

42 



469. Mozart, W. A. — J. Attwood's Harmony exercises corrected by 

the composer. Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

470. Dussek, J. L.— Pianoforte concerto. Lent by Miss E. A. 

Willmott. . 

471. Beethoven. — Autograph score of the " Hofmann " Canon, 

published in the " CaeciKa," Vienna, 1825. On the reverse 
are pencil notes for the " Missa Solemnis." Lent by Mr. W. 
Westley Manning. 

472. Sonata in G (Op. 79) by Beethoven. Auto., but with only the 

last eight bars of the middle movement. Formerly in the 
possession of Muzio Clementi. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

473. Beethoven, L. van. — A leaf from composer's sketch-book 

containing first ideas for Pastoral Symphony. Lent by Mrs. 
Courtauld. 

474. Beethoven, L. van. — MS. of Ninth (Choral) Symphony, with 

the composer's autograph dedication to the Philharmonic 
Society. Lent by the Philharmonic Society. 

475. Beethoven, L. van. — Overture in C opus 124. Lent by Mr. 

G. Donaldson. 

476. Beethoven. — Page of sketches for Missa solemnis. Lent by 

Mr. Arthur O'Leary. 

477. Beethoven. — Sketches, chiefly for the Mass in D. Lent by Mr. 

Felix Moscheles. 

478. Beethoven, L. van. — Sketches for the Quartet in C minor. 

Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

479. Beethoven, L. van. — Four pages of music notes. Folio. Lent 

by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

480. Beethoven, L. van. — Music from Sir G, Smart's collection. 

Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

481. Beethoven. — Autograph, also one of Haydn. Lent by Dr. 

Cummings. 

482. Beethoven L. van. — Five leaves. Lent by Miss E. A. 

Willmott. 

483. Beethoven. — MS. Sonato, o.p. no, No. 31 (Photo). Lent 

by Mr. Watson Smith. 

483a. Sketch Book (Overture, Op. 124). Lent by Mr. E. F. Searles. 

484. Chernbini, L. — Symphony in D major composed expressly for 

the Philarmonic Society. Autograph Score. Lent by the 
Philharmonic Society. 

485. Chernbini, L. — Canon, composed in 181 1. Lent by Mr. Felix 

Moscheles. 

486. Clementi Muzio. — Piano cadenza, in his handwriting, together 

with a letter written by the compossr to a Mrs. Alpe of 
Hardingham Hall, Norfolk, and bearing date " London, 
March 29th, '98." Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill, 

43 



487. Clementi, Muzio, Study, dated March 18 . Lent by 

Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

488. Weber, Carl, Maria von. — Autograph. Lent by Dr. W. H. 

Cummings. 

489. Schubert, Franz. — Copy of "Memnon," "Antigone und 

CEdip," with composer's signature. " Sch mp No. 6i " and 
one or two corrections. Lent by Mr. W. Westley Manning,; 

490. Schubert. — Song. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

491. Schubert, Fr — Song (1818). Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

492. Auber, D. F. E. — Four part Chorus, "O Salutaris Hostia." 

Auto. Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. „, 

493. Mendelssohn, F. — Scherzo from Otetto, orchestrated expressly s 

for the Philharmonic Society by the Composer. Auto. MS,J 
Lent by the Philharmonic Society. 

494. Mendelssohn, F. — MS. of Rondo Capriccio in earlier form than 

the published one. Lent by Mr. L. T. Rowe. 

495. Mendelssohn. — Songs without words, Book I., Op. 30, and duet 

written with Moscheles. Fantasia and Variations on Weber's 
Preciosa for two pianos and Orchestra. Full score. Lent by 
Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

496. Mendelssohn, F. — Sextet (Op. 88.) Lent by Mr. Felix 

Moscheles. 

497. Mendelssohn, — Opening bars of " The Lord is Mindful " (auto- , 

graph), in Album of Miss Maria B. Hawes, who sang in 
"St. Paul," at the Birmingham Festival, 1840. Lent by 
Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

498. Mendelssohn,. F. — The original score of the Pianoforte arrange- 

ment of " Elijah." Mostly Autograph. Lent by Mr. C. V. 
Benecke. 

499. Mendelssohn. — Set of two Part Songs. Lent by Miss E. A. 

Willmott. 

500. Mendelssohn.— Autograph of Vocal Diiet, " Sonntagslied." , 

Lent by Mr. Arthur O'Leary. 

501. Mendelssohn, F. — Autograph Song. Lent by Mr. Walter 

Macfarren. 

502. Mendelssohn. — One Sheet 'of MS. (Orch. score). Lent by 

Dr. H. A. Harding. 

503. Mendelssohn, F. — MS. book of songs written out by the 

composer for Jenny Lind, with covers drawn and painted by 
him . Lent by Mrs. Raymond Maude... 

504. Mendelssohn. — Autograph copy of his first Organ Sonata in F 

minor, dedicated to Dr. F. Schlemmer, presented to Annette 
Preusser by the composer. Leipzig, January 13th, 1846. 
The manuscript differs considerably from the ordinary 
printed edition. Lent by Mr. Arthur O'Leary. 

44 



505. Schumann, R. — Auto MS. of Quintet for piano and strings. 

Lent by Miss Eugenie Schumann. 

506. Schumann, R. — Fragment signed by the composer. Lent by 

Mr. G. Donaldson. 

507. Schumann, Clara. — Beginning of a pianoforte Scherzo Auto., 

with inscription to her then pupil Otto Goldschmidt (1845). 
Lent by Mr. Otto Goldschmidt. 

508. Schumann, Clara. — Song composed to words of Geibel. 

London, July, 1845. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

509. Brahms, J.— Music. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

510. Berlioz. — Theme of the Melody "Le Spectre de La Rose." 

Darmstadt, May 12th, 1843. Auto. Lent by Mr. Adolph 
Schlosser. 

511. Liszt, Fr. — " Poco Adagio," from the " Graner" Mass, penned 

by Liszt, and dated 1847. Lent by the Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

512. Liszt, Fr. — Fragment. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

513. Wagner, Richard. — Original Text of "Tristan," and a sketch 

leaf. (Walkure & Leigfried.) Lent by Mr. A. Kummer. 

514. Wagner, Richard. — " Polonia," Ouverture. First violin part 

only. Autograph written in 1833, when Wagner was studying 

under , at Leipzig. 

On title-page is a statement, signed " M. Fiirstenau," 

to the effect that all six pages are in the handwriting of the 

composer. Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

515. Saint-Saens. — Song, " The- voice of the Cedar Tree." Auto. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

516. Donizetti, Gaetano Canzonetta. — " II nome Indovinato." 

(1816). Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

517. Gounod, Ch. — Fragment of Marguerite's part in " Faust " 

(Garden scene). Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

518. Verdi. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

519. Spohr, L. — Two movements — Adagio molto and Allegro vivace 

— for full orchestra. Auto. M.S. Lent by the Philharmonic 
Society. 

520. Spohr, Louis. — Manuscript in composer's handwriting Excerpt 

from the Violin studies. • Lent by-Lady Cusins. 

521. Spohr, L. — Two bars. (Play upon the name Spohr.) (1844)- 

Lent by W. T. Freemantle. 

522. Spohr, L— Canon. Cassel, Dec. 15th, 1850. Lent by W. T. 

Freemantle. 

523. Spohr, L— Verse. Cassel, May 3rd, 1842. Lent by W. T. 

Freemantle. 

524. Spohr, L.— Song. Cassel, Nov., 1857. Lent by W. T. Free- 

mantle. 

45 



525. Paganini, Nicolo. — Quartets for violin, viola, guitar, and 

violoncello in B, A minor, F, A, and A. MSS,, (all un- 
published). Lent by Mr. Alfred Burnett. 

526. Paganini. — "Rondo Allegretto." Autograph, dated May i, 

1831. Lent by Hon. Mrs, Spencer. 

527. Rode, J. P. J. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

528. Sivori, C. — Cappriccio, with dedication to Madame Hiller. 

Aug. 6th, [842. Lent by Mr. Waison Smith. 

529. Vieuxtemps, Henri— Air varie. Autograph. Lent by Messrs, 

Artaria. (See special Artaria case, No. 48.) 

530. Vieuxtemps Henri. — Caprice. June 3rd, 1833. (Auto.) Lent 

by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

531. Servais, Francois. — Fantaisie for Violoncello with pf. accom- 

paniment on Auber's " La Muette de Portici." Auto. Lent 
by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

532. Benedict.— Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

533. David Ferd. — Song for Madame Hiller. Aug., 1844. Lent by 

Mr. Watson Smith. 

534. Dohler, Theodor. — Study. Auto. Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

535. Dragonetti Domenico. — Sonata per il Contrabasso Solo con 

1'accompagnamento d'un Violino, due Viole, e Basso, contra- 
basso part. Auto. Also a manuscript of the Sonata with 
pianoforte accompaniment presented by the Composer to the 
Duchess of Leinster, Sept. 3, 1840. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. 
Hill. 

536. Dragonetti, Domenico. — Cappriccio for three Violas (t 1846), 

Auto. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

537. Ernst, W. H.— Song to Madame Hiller. Dec. 1st, 1842. Lent 

by Mr. Watson Smith. 

538. Gade, N. W. — " Spanische Romanza," composed for the Album 

of Madame Hiller, March 2nd, 1844. Lent by Mr. Watson 
Smith. 

539. Garcia, Emmanuele. — Se mi prestasse ivanni. Notturno a tre 

voci. Lent by Madame Costa. 

540. Hiller, Ferdinand.— Song, " Das Stanchen.'' Lent by Mr. 

Watson Smith. 

541. Lind-Goldschmidt (Jenny),— Auto, of a Cadenza composed 

for the Album of Ferdinand Hiller. Lent by Mr. Otto 
Goldschmidt. 

542. Moscheles, Ignaz.— Beatrice di Tenda. Full score. Lent by 

Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

543. Moscheles, Ignaz. — Concerto in G minor, Op. 60., pfte. part. 

Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

46 



544. Moscheles, Ignaz. — Studies for the pianoforte. Lent by Mr. 

Felix Moscheles. 

545. Moscheles, Ignaz.— Study, dated March, 1869. Lent by Mr. 

Felix Moscheles. 

546. Moscheles, Ignaz. — Organ part to Beethoven's 9th Symphony. 

Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

547. Menkomm, S. — Canon for three equal voices, with words, 

" S. Neukomm. Erinnern sie sich Isola bella, Como. 
Milano, und Thres freundes S. Neukomm, Mailand, den 
3 Oktober, 1840." Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

548. Pergolesi, Miserere. — Autograph. On first page is written, 

" Laisse au couvent des Capucins a Vozzuoli ou il [the 
composer] mourut." Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

549. Reissiger, C. — Song for Madame Hiller, Dresden, Aug. 1st, 

1845. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

550. Holla, Alessandro. — Sonata for Viola accompaniment, 1824. 

Auto. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

551. Seyfried— Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

552. Mayseder, Joseph. — Canon, in three parts. (Auto.) May 5th, 

1823. Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

553. Thalberg, S. — Song, "La Partenza." Lent by Mr. Watson 

Smith. 

554. Thalberg, S. — Dated Yarmouth, Nov. 15th, 1839. L ent by 

Hon. Mrs. C. R. Spencer. 

J555. Moscheles. — Sonata symphonique. (Auto.) Pianoforte Duet. 
Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

556. Chopin. — Waltz in F minor. (Auto.) Lent by Mr. Adolph 
Schlosser. 

'557. Liszt, F. — Arpeggio Chords. Prelude Omnitonique. (Auto.) 
Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

558. Meyerbeer, G-. — Sketch from " L'Africaine." (Auto.) Lent by 

Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

559. Wagner, Richard. — Trumpet calls played between the acts of 

the '-Ring" at Bayreuth. (Auto.) Lent by Mr. H. Plunket 
Greene. 

568. Wagner. — A very fine Sketch of Prelude to Tristan (Paris, 
June, i860) in composer's handwriting. Lent by Mr. Adolph 
Schlosser. 

561. Grieg.— Theme of Ballade. Op. 24. (Auto.) Lent by Mr. 
Adolph Schlosser. 

47 



Autograph Letters. 

BRITISH. 

562. Gibbons, Orlando.— Letter at bottom of organ builder's bill, 

1625. The. only known letter of Gibbons. Lent by the 
Dean and Chapter of Westminster. 

563. Balfe, M. W— Letter, dated 1837, to G. Watts, Esq. Lent by 

Mr. G. Donaldson. 

564. Balfe, M. W.— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

565. Benedict, Sir Julius. — Letter. Lent by Mr. Saxe Wyndham. 

566. Bennett, W. Stemdale. — Letter to C. Lonsdale, Fitzroy Square, 

Nov. 8th, 1849. Letter marked private, re aid towards form- 
ation of a library for the Bach Society. Lent by Mr. Arthur 
F. Hill. 

567. Bennett, Stemdale. — Letter. Lent by Mr. H. Saxe Wyndham. 

568. Best, W. T. — Characteristic letter to Mr. Casson, condemning 

monster Organs. Lent by Positive Organ Co., Ld. 

569. Bishop, Henry Rowley. — Letter to Mr. Anderson. May, i8th, 

1849. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

570. Bishop, Sir Henry. — Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

571. Bishop, Sir Henry. — Letter, dated Dec, 18 15, expressing 

willingness to compose an Elegy on death of their brother 
member Salomon, if Directors of the Philharmonic will give 
assurance that; the work, when completed, will be performed. 
Lent by Hon. Mrs. Spencer. 

572. Braham, John. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, April 14th, 1855. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

573. Cramer, J. B. — Letter to George Hogarth, Feb. 18th, 1853. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

574. Crotch, Dr. William. — Letter dated January 28th, 1813. 

Lent by the Hon. Mrs. Spencer. 

575. Dibdin, Charles. — Letter. Lent by Miss A. E. Willmott. 

576. Dolby, Charlotte H.— Letter to Sir W. Cusins. (1856.) Lent 

by Lady Cusins. 

577. Ella, J.— Letter, March 22nd, 1880. Lent by J. S. Shedlock. 

578. Elvey, Sir G. J.— Letter. Lent by Mr. H. Saxe Wyndham. 

579. Field, Henry J. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, June 26th, 1846. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

580. Hatton, J. L.— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

581. Horn, C— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 



582. Hacfarren, G — Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

583. Onslow, George. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, April 21st, 1849, on 

learning that His Royal Highness Prince Albert accepts the 
dedication to him of the Nonetto. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

584. Onslow, Geo. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, dated Clermont, April 

24th, 1849. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

585. Onslow, George. — Letter to Artaria, 1820. Lent by Messrs. 

Artaria. (See special Artaria Case, No. 38.) 

586. Ouseley, Rev. Sir P. A. G. — Letter. Lent by Mr. Watson 

Smith. 

587. Ouseley, Rev. Sir F. A. G— Letter. Lent by Mr. H. Saxe 

Wyndham. 

588. Smart, Sir George.— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Smart. 

589. Smart, Sir George.— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A Willmott. 

590. Stainer, Sir John.— Letter. Lent by Mr. H. Saxe Wyndham. 

591. Sullivan, Sir Arthur.— Letter. Lent by Mr. H. Saxe 

Wyndham. 

592. Taylor, Gresham.— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

593. Thomas, A. Goring. — Letter to Mr. Cusins, "June 21." Lent 

by Lady Cusins. 

594. Walmisley, T— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

595. Wesley, S. — Three Letters to Mr. Street — 1797, 1799, and 

" Saturday, November 9th," . Lent by Mr. J. E. Street. 



FOREIGN. 

596. Alard, Delphin (1815-1888).— Author of '• L'Ecole du Violon." 

Letter dated Paris, December 23, 1841, to M. Schimon, 
composer of " Ruse contre Ruse (1861)." Lent by Mr. 
Edward Heron Allen. 

597. Aft&t, Padilla. — Letter-card. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

598. Auber, D. P. E. — Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

599. Bach, J. S. — Letter dated Leipzig, 1743, acknowledging receipt 

•of five thalers. Lent by Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

€00. Bach, J. S. — Letter. Lent by Dr. Darmstaedler. 

■601. Bach, J. S. — Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

■602. Baillot, Pierre Marie Francois de Sales (1771-1842), author 
of " L'Art du Violon."— Letter, dated Paris, Aug: 27, 1824, 
to F. Pixis, violinist and composer. Lent by Mr. Edward 
Heron Allen. 

49 



603. Bazzini.— Letter and Music. 2nd Oct., 1880. Lent by Mr. 

Adolph Schlosser. 

604. Berlioz, Hector.— Letter addressed to Le Normant, concerning 

a composition of his to be performed at the "Concerts 
Spirituel," but only if Kreutzer sends favourable reply. Lent 
by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

605. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter (1814) addressed to Count Moritz 

Lichnowsky announcing dedication to him of the Sonata in 
E minor. Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

606. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter to Louis Schlosser, May 6th, 1823. 

Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

607. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter addressed to B. Schott and Sons 

concerning the Mass in D, the Choral Symphony, the 
Quartet, Op. 127, and minor works. Lent by Hon. Mrs. 
Spenser. 

608. Beethoven, L. van. — Last letters to Ignaz Moscheles, in the 

handwriting of Anton Schindler. Lent by Mr. Felix 
Moscheles. 

609. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter to " Sir John Falstaff," nickname 

given by the composer to Ignaz Schuppanzigh, violinist. Lent 
by Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria case No. 2). 

610. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter to Count Rasoumoff sky concerning 

the quartet, Op. 59, No. 2. Hopes to complete No. 3 
shortly. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

611. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter to Haslinger. Lent by Mr. J. A. 

Fuller Maitland. 

612. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter addressed to Herr Holz. Lent by 

Mrs. Courtauld. 

613. Beethoven, L. vatl. — Letter addre-sed to Government Coun- 

cillor Herr von Varena. Lent by Mrs. Courtauld. 

• 615. Beethoven, L. van. — Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

616. Beriot, C. A. de (1802-1870), husband of Madame Malibran. 

Letter, dated Feb., 24, 1832, to Louis Viardot, afterwards 
husband of Malibran's sister, Pauline Viardot-Garcia, ", 
relative to an engagement of Malibran at the Italiens at 
, 16,000 francs for a month, two performances a week, and 
three if she feels, so disposed. Lent by Mr. Edward 
Heron Allen. 

617. Beriot, C. A. de. — Letter to Cuvillon concerning a young 

Italian violinist, six years of age, " who already plays in an 
astonishing manner," requesting Dr. Beriot to take him as 
pupil. Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

618. Berlioz. — Letter to Schlosser, Paris, 29th April, 1853. Lent by 

Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

60 



619. Berlioz, Hector.— Letter to David about his " Second Oratoire 

L'arrivee a Sais." Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

620. Berlioz, Hector.— Letter, Paris, Sept. 6, 1858. Lent by Mr. 

William Thomas Freemantle. 

621. Benda, C. H. P. (1748-1810 ?), son of Franz Benda, and 

teacher of the violin to Wilhelm III. of Prussia. Lent by 

Mr. Edward Heron Allen. 

Contract (under seal, dated Berlin, June 14, 1807, for 
the sale of a violin by Antonius and Hieronymous Amati, 
the favourite instrument of his father, dated Cremona. 
1769. 

622. Boccherini Ltdgi.— Letter (1780). Lent by Messrs. Artaria. 

(See Special Artaria case No. 15). 

623. Boieldieu, F. A.— Letter addressed to Madame Recamier, 

Jan. 8th, 1829. Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

Writer feels unable to write choruses desired by Mons. 
de Chateaubriand. 

624. Boito, Arrigo.— Letter to '* Messieurs Novello, Ewer," dated 

Nice, August 18th, concerning a proposal that he should 
compose a sacred work. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

625. Boito, Arrigo.— Letter to Mr. Littleton, dated Milan, Sept. 7th, 

regretting that he is too busy to think calmly over the 
proposal to write a sacred work. Lent by Alfred Littleton. 

626. Brahms, Job..— Letter and Post-card to Ferd. Hiller. Lent 

by Mr. Watson Smith. 

627. Brahms, Joh. — Letter. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

628. Brassin, Louis. — Letter Card. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

629. Brnch, Max. — Letter. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

630. Bull. — Ole Bornemann (1810-1880), " the most eccentric of the 

virtuosi" (fetis). Letter, dated Deeember 15th, 1841, to his 
cousin,- Professor Motzfeldt.- Lent by Mr. Edward Heron 
Allen. 

631. Billow, Hans von. — Letter, Berlin, February 21st, 1857. 

Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

632. Cherubim, Luigi. — Letter, dated December 2nd, 1 829, addressed 

to Le Vicomte de Larochefoucaiild. Lent by Mr. G. 
Donaldson. 

633. Chernbini, Luigi. — Letter addressed to L. Schlosser, dated 

Paris, 27th August, 1825. Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

631. Cherubini, Luigi. — Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

635. Chopin, Frederic. — Letter asking for Kastner's Treatise on 
Instrumentation and Cherubini's Counterpoint. Lent by 
Mr.. W. Westley Manning. 

51 



€36. Chopin, Frederic. — Letter about his Fourth Scherzo. Lent by 
Mr.. W. Westley Manning. 

637. Clementi, Muzio. — Letter to Artaria, dated London, December 

2 ist, 1798. Lent by Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria 
case, No. 16.) 

638. Delibes, Leo, to the Director of the Gymnasium, asking for a 

box at the Gymnasium. Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

639. Duport, J. L. (Duport, Cadet), 1749-1819. Cellist to whom 

Beethoven dedicated his two Sonatas, Op. 5, which he played 
with the composer at Berlin in 1796. 

Letter, dated Potsdam, September 16th, 1798 to 

Beethoven, acknowledging dedication of the Sonatas. Lent 

by Mr. Edward Heron Allen. 

640. Dvorak, Antonin — Letter to Mr. Alfred Littleton, October, 

1884, in which composer speaks of himself as a man " whose 
heart sticks to all what is Englisch." At back of letter are 
" A moviment from ' The Wedding Gown.' " Lent by 
Alfred Littleton. 

641. Ernst, W. H. — Letter to David, 16th March, 1849. Lent by 

Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

642. Fetis, F. J. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, July 10th, 1846. Lent 

by Lady Cusins. 

643. Gluck, C. W. (Bitter von). — Document signed. Lent by Dr. 

• Darmstaedler. 

644. Gounod, Charles. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins introducing Mile. 

Clothilde Kleeberg. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

645. Gounod, Charles. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins, June 9th, 187I'. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

646. Gounod, Charles.— Letter to Madame Trebelli. Lent by Mr. 

Burnham W. Horner. 

647. Gretry, A.. E. M.— Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

648. Grisi, Giulia. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, May 24th, 1864. Lent 

by Lady Cusins. 

649. Halevy, J. F. E— Letter, dated " Samedi," to M. Lefeuillade. 

Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

650. Handel, G. F.— Letter. Lent by Dr. Darmstaedler. 

651. Handel, G. F— Letter to Charles Jennens. Lent by Earl 

Howe, G.C.B. 

652. Hauptmahn, Moritz— Letter. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

653. Haydn, Jos.— Three letters — 178 1, 1800 and 1805. Lent by 

Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria case, Nos. 18, 20, 21.) 

52 



654. Haydn, Jos.— Letter to Polzelli, dated Eisenstadt, August 28th, 
1802, asking him for the fugue quartetts of Gallus, which 
are on the clavier in his bedroom or in the room opposite,, 
also for his calendar. He refers apparently to his house 
in Vienna. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

656. Heller, Stephen.— Letter from Paris to Ferd. Hiller. Lent by 

Mr. Watson Smith. 

657. Henselt, Ad.— Letter to Ferd. Hiller (1876). Lent by Mr. 

Watson Smith. 

658. Hiller, Ferd. — Letter on music-paper to his parents, from 

Stuttgart (1833). Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

659. Hiller, Ferd.— Letter to Mr. Anderson, May 13th, 1852. Lady 

Cusins. 

660. Hummel, J. R— Letter in English to Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, 

March 7th, 1 831. 

P.S.— " Mrs. Hummel and the little Charles sends you 
many compliments' and kisses." Lady Cusins. 

661. Joachin, Joseph. — Letter. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

662. Krausz, Gahrielle.— Letter (1870). Lent by Mn Watson 

Smith. 

663. Lablache, L. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, June 22nd, 1842. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

664. Lafont, C. P. (1781-1839), pupil of Rode, and rival of Paganini. 

— Letter, dated March 18, 1825, to M. Duplantin, " Adminis- 
trateur en chef de l'Acad£mie Royale de Musique," arranging 
to play at two concerts. Lent by Mr. Edward Heron Allen. 

666. Lind-Goldschmidt, Jenny. Letters to Mr. Cusins, July 16th 

and September 10th. Lady Cusins. 

667. Lipinski, K. J. (1790-1861) Concertmeister at Dresden. — 

Letter, dated August i6th, 1830, to C. F. Peters, concerning 
publication of his Military Concerto. Lent by Mr. Edward 
Heron Allen. 

668. Liszt, Franz. — Letter to a friend, 4th February, 1857, con- 

cerning a concert at Leipzig. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

669. Liszt, Franz. — Letter dated August 7th, 1879. Weimar to 

Sir W. Cusins. Lent by Lady Cusins; 

670. Liszt, Franz. — Letter to Mr. Alfred Littleton, Weimar, October 

14th, 1885, in which the composer announces his intention to 
come to London again "after forty years." Lent by Alfred 
Littleton. 

671. Liszt, Franz. — Letter written to Sir W. Cusins, 'the last written 

by Liszt before leaving England; Envelope addressed by 
Walter Bache. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

673, Lortzing, G. A.— Letter to David, 1st Feb., 1845. Lent by 
Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

58 



674. Lully, J. B — Letter. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

675. Lully, J. B.— Letter. Lent by Dr. Darmstaedler. 

676. Massenet, Jules— Letter, dated Aug. 15th, 1878, to Monsieur 

le Marquis de St. Hilaire. Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

677. Massenet, Jules— Letter to Sir W. Cusins, Paris, July cjth 

1 879. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

678. Malibran, Madame.— Letter in English to Mrs. Anderson, 

" Sunday, May the 10th." Lent by Lady Cusins. 

679. Mario, G. — Letter to Mr. Anderson, June 22nd, 1842. Lent 

by Lady Cusins. 

680. Marschner, H. A. — Letter to Ferd. Hiller. Lent by Mr. 

Watson Smith. 

681. Mendelssohn, Felix. — Letter, dated Berlin, September 18th, 

1832. " Too busy to write a ' Rondo ' as requested." Sends 
a selection of Schubert songs. Lent by the Hon. Mrs. 
Spencer. 

682. Mendelssohn. — Letter to a stationer about note-paper, Aug. 

24th, 1835. Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

683. Mendelssohn.— Letter to David, 6th Feb., 1837. Lent by Mr. 

Joseph Ludwig. 

684. Mendelssohn - Bartholdy. — Letter, 1844. L ent by Messrs. 

Artaria. (See Special Artaria case, No. 28). 

685. Mendelssohn. — Letter to Annette Preusser (Berlin, Feb. 11, 

1844), sending some figured and unfigured basses to work at. 
Letter contains interesting reference to Schumanns starting 
for Russia. Lent by Arthur O'Leary. 

686. Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. — Letter in English to Sir W. 

Cusins, Ltipzig, March 11, 1846, begging him to thank His 
Roydl Highness Prince Albert for " the continued kindness 
he shows to me and my music." Lady Cusins. 

687. Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy. — Letter -to Sir W. Cusins, 

Leipzig, May 8, 1846, on forwarding full score and parts of 
Oedipus for His Royal Highness Prince Albert. Lent by. 
Lady Cusins. 

688. Mendelssohn, F. — Letter in English to Sir G. Macfarren, dated 

September 25, 1846, concerning performance of a symphony 
and overture of Mactarren at the Gewandhaus Concerts, 
Leipzig. Lent by Miss Agnes Zimmermann. 

689. Mendelssohn. — Letter to Niels W. Gade. Leipzig, 1st Oct., 

1847. Lent by Mr. W. T. Freemantle. 

690. Cecile Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, wife of the composer. — Letter 

to Sir W. Cusins, dated Leipzig, Nov. 30, 1847, in reference 
to " the command of Her Majesty and His Royal Highness 
Prince Albert." Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy died, Nov, 4, 
1847. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

54 



691. Mendelssohn Scholarship.— Letter (dated 4 July, 1856) from 

C. Klingemann, Hon. Secretary to the Mendelssohn Com- 
mittee, to " Master Arthur Seymour Sullivan " informing 
him of his election. Lent by Mr. Herbert Sullivan. 

692. Meyerbeer, G — Letter to " Herr Doctor." Lent by Mr. G. 

Donaldson. 

693. Meyerbeer, G. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins, London, July 24, 

1855, sending his " obole " ten guineas to the Royal Society 
of Musicians of Great Britain. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

694. Meyerbeer, G — Letter. Lent by Mr. W. H. Saxe Wyndham. 

695. Meyerbeer, G. — Letter. Lent by the Hon. Mrs. Spencer. 

696. Meyerbeer, . G— Letter to Mons. Lord. Lent by Mr. G. 

Donaldson. 

697. Moliqrie, B. (1803-1869), pupil of Spohr. 

Letter, dated Stuttgart, December 4, 1840, to the 
Capellmeister of the Royal Band insisting on immunity 
from rehearsals of familiar operas. Lent by Mr. Edward 
Heron Allen. 

698. Molique, W. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins, London, May 14, 1849. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

699. Mori, N., pupil of Viotti, leader of the Philharmonic band. 

Receipt for services at the " Concert of Ancient Music," 
1833. Lent by Mr. Edward Heron Allen. 

700. Moscheles, I. — Letter. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

701. Moscheles, I. — Letter. Lent by Mr. H. Saxe Wyndham. 

702. Mozart, Leopold.- — Letter, 1786. Lent by Messrs. Artaria. 

(See Special Artaria Case No. 29.) 

703. Mozart, W. A. — Letters to his father and sister, 1787 and 1770. 

Lent by Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria Case, Nos. 
31 and 32.) 

705. Novello, Clara. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins, London, August 

24th, 1854. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

706. Novello, Clara.— Letters to Sir W. Cusins, March 14th, 1855. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

707. Novello, Clara.— Letter to Sir W. Cusins, May 22nd, 1855. 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

709. Paer, P.— Letter, dated Paris, Oct. 26th, 1824. Lent by the 

Hon. Mrs. Spencer. 

710. Faganini, Niccolo. — Letter to Artaria, 1828. Lent by 

Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria Case, No. 39.) 

711. Paganini, Niccolo. — Letter, '.under glass. Lent by Mr. Joseph 

Ludwig. 

55 



712. Pleyel, Ignaz. — Letters to Artaria, 1792 and 1800. Lent by 

Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria.. Case, Nos. 43 and 42.) 

713. Poniatowski, Prince.— Letter. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

717. Joachim Raff. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins from Frankfort, July 
2, 1879, about setting to music the poem "A voice by the 
Cedar Tree." Lent by Lady Cusins. 

715. Joachim Raff. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins, Frankfort, July 26, 
1 88 1. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

717. Ries, Ferdinand. — Letter. Lent by the Hon. Mrs. Spencer. 

718. Rode, P. (1774- 1830)— Pupil of Viotti. 

Album-leaf, dated Berlin, January 15, 1820, and on 
back a similar album-leaf with inscription by E. T. A. 
Hofmann. Lent by Mr. Edward Heron Allen. 

719. Rossini, G. A. — Letter to Artaria, 1822. Lent by Messrs. 

Artaria. (See Special Artaria Case, No. 45.) 

720. Romberg, Bernard. — Autograph letters to Mr. Lidel (1839- 

1840). Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

721. Rossini, G. A. — Letter, dated 1852, to Senor Sentino, concern- 

ing an engraving, and a painting at Palermo. Lent by 
Mr. G. Donaldson. 

722. Rossini, G. A.— Letter, in Italian, dated Paris, 6th November, 

1856, to Sir Michael Costa, thanking him for a present 
of a stilton cheese, and complimenting him on his success 
as an oratorio composer. [Oratorio Eli produced at 
Birmingham Musical Festival in 1855.] Lent by the Royal 
College of Music. 

723. Rossini.— Letter to Sig. Maestro Costa, dated Florence, April 

17, introducing Madame Maillard. Lent by Hon. Mrs. 
Spenser. 

724. Rouget de Lisle. — Letter addressed to Madame Recamier, 

thanking him for interest taken in his " Macbeth," July 31st, 
1827. Lent by Mr. G. Donaldson. 

725. Rubinstein, A.— Letter to Sir W. Cusins (Cheltenham, 

April 26, 1877), announcing that " I will be to the service 
of Her Majesty on the 7th Mai 3 o'clock in Windsor Castle." 
Lent by Lady Cusins. 

726. Rubinstein, A.— Letter to Sir W. Cusins (March 12, 1882), 

introducing Loewenberg, "a very distinguished pianist." 
Lent by Lady Cusins. 

727. Sabatier, TTngher— Letter to Lady Cusins (Mar. 4, '69). 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

728. Saint-Sa&ns Camille.— Letter to Sir W. Cusins, Angers, 

Feb. 12, 1855. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

729. Saint-Saens, Camille.— Letter to Sir W. Cusins (Sept. 29th, 

1884.) Lent by Lady Cusins. 

56 



730. Schubert, Franz.— MS. letter in frame dated Aug. 24th, 1818. 

Concerning a Requiem. Lent by Miss Carola Geisler 
Schubert. 

731. Schumann, R.— Letter, dated May 17, 1849, to J- H. H'artel, 

of Leipzig, stating that his " Album of Songs for the Young" 
is nearly completed, and hopes that a first edition may be 
brought out in October. Lent by Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

732. Schumann, Robert and Clara— Letter addressed to .Verhulst 

Diisseldorf, March 9, 1851. Lent by Mrs. Elischer- Verhulst. 

733. Schumann, Robert.— Letter to Verhulst, the Dutch composer, 

dated Diisseldorf, May 6, 1853, telling him of a small room 
where he can lodge during the musical festival. Lent by 
Mrs. Elischer- Verhulst. 

734. Schumann, R.— Letter to Cocks and Co., dated Aug. 3rd, 1853, 

Lent by Mr. Adolph Schlosser. 

735. Schumann, Robert.— Letter to David, Friday. Lent by Mr. 

Joseph Ludwig. 

736. Clara Schumann.— Letter in English to Sir W. Cusins, June 

8, 1863. Lady Cusins. 

737. Clara Schumann. — Letter, Feb. 26, 1870. Lady Cusins. 

738. Clara Schumann. — Letter to Sir W. Cusins, March 23, 1877. 

Lady Cusins. 

739. Schumann, Clara. — Letter. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

740. Servais, A. F. (1 807-1 866). 'Cellist to the King of the Belgians. 

Letter, dated September 20, 1852, to a friend introducing a 
young virtuoso, pupil of de Bgriot. Lent by Mr. Edward 
Heron Allen. 

741. Sivori, E. C. (1815-1894).. Pupil of Paganini. Letter inviting 

the Director of the Menestrel to a concert in the Salle Herz 
in February, 1843, of which he gives the programme. Lent 
by Mr. Edward Heron Allen. 

742. Sivori, J. B. and Camillo. — Letters to M. Adolphe Duchene 

on same sheet, from Boston (Oct. 31, 1846). Lent by Lady 
Cusins. 

743. Spohr, Louis— Letter, Cassel, April 7th, 1847. 

Learns that Parliament is to be dissolved and thinks of 
postponing his " Oratories " at Exeter Hall in consequence. 
Lent by the Hon. Mrs. Spencer. 

744. Spohr, Louis. — Letter to Herr Hofrath Rochlitz, in which he 

expresses annoyance at the opposition to his opera " Pietro 
v. Abrano," but consoles himself with the thought that it will 
be appreciated later on. Lent by Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

■745. Spohr, Louis. — Letter to Kuhnel, written from Gotha, Dec. 19, 
[i8o]8. Lent by Mr. William Thomas Freemantle. 

57 



746. Spontini, Gasparo — Letter to Artaria, 1823. Lent by Messrs. 

Artaria. {See special Artaria Case, No. 47.) 

747. Strauss, Johann.— Letter. Lent by Dr. Darmstaedler. 

748. Tamburini.— Letter, dated June 12th. Lent by the Hon. Mrs. 

Spencer. 

749. Thomas, Amhroise — Letter, Aug. 22nd, 1879. Lent by Lady 

Cusins. 

750. Tschaikowsky, P. T.— Interesting- four-page letter with English 

translation. Lent by Mr. W. Westley Manning. 

751. Verdi. — Letter addressed to Mr. Littleton, London, May 29, 

1875, thanking him, the vocalists, choir, and orchestra, con- 
ductor, and organist for the care taken in the performance of 
his '* Requiem." Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

752. Verdi, G. — Letter to Ferd. Hiller, dated Milan, March 12, 

1877. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

753. Verdi. — Letter. Lent by Mr. A. Littleton. 

754. Verdi, Giuseppe. — Letter (framed). Lent by Lady Grove. 

755. Vieuxtemps, H. — Pupil of de Beriot. Album-leaf (a line of 

music with inscription), dated Sept. 16, 1864, for M. 
Benacci. Lent by Mr. Edward Heron Allen. 

756. Vieuxtemps. — Letter to a friend, 27th Dec, 1864. An 

interesting letter. Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

757. Viotti, J. B. — Letter, dated Jan. 3, 1816, thanking the 

Philharmonic Society for honour conferred in electing him 
one of the Directors. Lent by Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

758. Viotti, G. B., (1753-1824), founder of the modern school of 

Violin playing. — Letter (undated) to L. E. Jadin, a prolific 
composer, acknowledging receipt of " un trop grand nombre 
de vos charmants ouvrages." Lent by Mr. Edward Heron 
Allen. 

759. Wagner, Richard.— Letter to Breitkopf and Hartel, dated 

July 18, 1843, offering score of his opera "The Flying 
Dutchman," for one thousand thalers (^150), part to be 
deducted in settlement of a debt to them, remainder to be 
sent on to him at once. Lent by Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

760. Wagner, Richard.— Letter, Dresden, Sept. 21, 1843, addressed 

to Herr Zumler, informing him that post in the Dresden 
band is filled, but a post as double-bass player, in conse- 
quence of Schubart's retiring, will soon be vacant. Lent by 
Mr. G. Donaldson. 

761. Wagner, Richard.— Letter to Concertmeister F. David, dated 
. Dresden, March 12, 1844, thankfully accepting a proposal 

made to him. He writes in a hurry as he is on the point of 
starting to Hamburg for the performance of his Rienzi. 
Lent by Mr. Joseph Ludwig. 

58 



762. Wagner, Richard.— Letter written most probably to Intendant 

of Weimar or Dresden Theatre re success of " The Fly 
Dutchman,'' Zurich, 31st Jan., 1853. Lent by Mr. Hahn. 

763. Wagner, Richard.— Letter from Zurich, Dec. 28, 1854, con- 

cerning his engagement by the Philharmonic Society. Lent 
by Lady Cusins. 

764. Wagner, Richard.— Letter to Mr. Anderson (n Mai, '55). 

Lent by Lady Cusins. 

765. Wagner, Richard.— Letter to Mr. Anderson asking for concert 

tickets for Berlioz, June 25, 1855. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

766. Wagner, Richard.— Letter to Mr. Anderson from Zurich, Dec. 

12, 1857, concerning score for a Royal Concert. Lent by 
Lady Cusins. 

767. Wagner.— Letter written from 16 Rue Newton, Champs- 

Klysees, Paris, June 19th, i860. Lent by Mr. Adolph 
Schlosser. 

768. Wagner, Richard. — Letter. Lent by Dr. Darmstaedler. 

769. Weber, Carl Maria von. — Letter to Artaria, 1809. Lent by 

Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria Case, No, 51.) 

770. Weber, C. Maria von. — Letter dated Jan. 29th, 1820, announcing 

his intention of completing hi* opera, " Jagers Braut." Lent 
by Hon. Mrs. Spenser. 

772. Wieniawski, H— Letter to Sir W. Cusins (1878). Lent by 
Lady Cusins. 



ALBUMS. 

773. Album which belonged to Annette Preusser, containing a sketch 

and a song in Mendelssohn's own handwriting, in friendly 
remembrance of Michel; host at the Crown, Meyringen, 
Leipzig, Sept. 29, 1842; a portrait of Joseph Joachim, by 
J. Wilhelm Gatner, dated Berlin, Jan. 13, 1845 ; a few bars 
of a song, "And the cloud hath passed away," by W. S. 
Bennett, London, March 29, 1859; a few bars from the 
Andante of Gade's " 1st Symphony," in composer's hand- 
writing, Leipzig, 1843; music by Otto Goldschmidt, March 
31, 1859, and a few notes with words by Jenny Goldschmidt, 
April 2, 1859; a sketch of a carriage drawn by goats, under- 
neath which is written " Liebe Anneth ich wunscheder Gluck. 
Paul Mendelssohn " ; a short pianoforte piece, signed 
"Joseph Joachim, Leipzig, Sept. 18, 1850"; song in Clara 
Schumann's handwriting, dated Leipzig, June, 1850; and a 
song (unpublished) signed, " In remembrance of the May 
and June days, 1852 — Robert Schumann," etc., etc. Lent by 
Arthur O'Leary. 

774. Album containing letters by Rossini, Zingarelli, etc. Lent by 

Madame Costa. 

59 



775. Album containing letters by Berlioz, Ambroise Thomas, 

Macfarren, etc. Lent by Madame Costa. 

776. Album containing 31 letters by Meyerbeer, Sullivan, Tietjeans, 

Sims Reeves, etc. Lent by Madame Costa. 

777. Album containing Royal Programmes of Private Concerts at 

Kemsington and Buckingham Palaces and Gloucester House, 
1 837-1 860. Lent by Madame Costa. 




60 



Trumpets, Cornets, Horns, and 
similar Wind Instruments. 



PREFACE. 

FOR the purpose of these brief notes, the organ, 
and its humble relatives the harmonium, the 
concertina, and a few other kindred instruments, 
may be passed by, as in common parlance, wind 
instruments signify those blown direct from the 
player's lips, either with or without a vibrating tongue 
or reed. In combination these constitute the " wind 
band " in the orchestra, and practically the whole 
strength of the military band. They are commonly 
classed in two divisions, as the " wood wind " and the 
" brass wind " — terms which are recommended by 
custom rather than by accuracy ; the further division 
of the " wood wind," into flutes and reed instruments, 
introduces a better basis for classification, as these 
definitions neglect the question of the material of 
which an instrument is made, and are based upon the 
means employed for tone-production. If to these 
two, "flutes" and "reeds," we add "cup-blown " or 
" lip-reed " in substitution for " brass," we have three 
definitions which are both accurate and practically 
convenient. 

Cup-blown Instruments. 

In every instrument of the cup-blown or horn 
kind, the lips take the place of the reed in a reed- 
instrument. The harmonics, or notes proper to the 
conical tubes used, follow the natural harmonic series, 
viz., c c 1 g* c" e" g", &c, with vibrational numbers 
123456, &c, and are successively obtained by 
increasing the compression of the lips. The notes to 
complete the diatonic or chromatic scales were, in 

61 



many families of instruments, obtained from side holes 
in the same manner as on the flute and clarionet, but 
such instruments died out during last century, the 
ophicleide having been the latest survival. In these 
each hole as opened virtually shortened the instru- 
ments, and thus a basis for a new harmonic series was 
obtained. 

During the last century methods of bringing 
extra lengths of tubing into the vibrating column, by 
various valve actions, were devised, and of these the 
direct-acting piston valve is now far the most widely 
used. Its various original defects have been over- 
come, and without the brass valve instruments military 
bands, as we now understand them, could not exist. 

The one cup-blown instrument capable of giving 
a scale, which has hot changed in principle and very 
little in detail since it was used with the old zincken, 
or cornetti, is the trombone. As a great portion of 
the length of this instrument is cylindrical, the intro- 
duction of a shifting slide is possible, and the various 
lengths thus obtainable afford the means of altering 
its fundamental note, and introducing new series of 
harmonics by which the scale is completed. 

D. I. BLAIKLEY. 



62 



Wind Instruments. 
Flutes and Pipes. 

778. Bird Pipe, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1800. 

779. Picco Pipe, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1860. 

780. Triple Flute-a-hec. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1825. 

781. English Flageolet.— Maker, Bainbridge. Lent by Mr. T. L. 

Southgate. 

1825. 

782. English Double Flageolet.— Maker, Bainbridge. Lent by 

Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

1825. 

783. Pastoral Pipe in Ivory, Irish. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

18th century. 

784. Shepherd's Pipe. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

785. Morris Dancer's Pipe. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

786. Wooden Shepherd's Pipe. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

787. Set of English Pan Pipes, Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

788. Pandean Pipes, French. — Painted and decorated. Lent by Mr. 

C. Van Raalte. 

18th century. 

789. Piccolo, Ivory. Lent by Col. T, B. Shaw-Hellier. 

790. Fife, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 1800. 

791. Transverse Flute in C. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1600. 

792. Set of Four Flutes. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1704. 

793. German Flute. — Boxwood, ivory mounts, one key. Lent by 

Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

794. German Flute.— Ivory, with two extra tuning joints. Lent by 

Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

795. Flute in D.— Belonged to Quantz. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

63 



796. Alto Piute in A, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin 

1800, 

797. Tenor Flute in F, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

798. Tenor Piute in G, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin " 1810. 

799. Bass Flute in D/ English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

lolU) 

800. Dulos Flute. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

801. Concert Flute. — Boxwood mounted with ivory. Maker, 

Millhouse. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

802. Dolce Flutes (Two). Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 
$03. Beaked Ivory Flute. Lent by Miss E. At Willmott. 

804. Bass Flute. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

805. Glass Flute. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

806. Flute, Boxwood, mounted in Ivory. — Maker Potter. Lent by 

Mr. Thomas A. Harper. 

807. Flute, Walking Stick, with. Sword. Lent by Miss E. A. 

Willmott. 

Recorders. 

808. Set of four Recorders. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1650. 

809. A Set of Recorders. Lent by the Chester Archaeological 

Society. 

810. Recorder, Flute-a-bec, Ivory, small. Lent bv Mr. T. W. 

Taphouse. 

811. Recorder, Flute-a-bec, Ivory. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 



Single Reeds. 

812. Pihgorn, Welsh. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

813. Stockhorn with two parallel tubes, Scotch. Lent by Rev. F. 

W. Galpin. 

814. Chalumeau, as improved by J. C. Denner. Lent by Rev. F. 

W. Galpin. 

c. 1610. 

815. Chalumeau in F. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

816. Clarinet, Soprano, Brass. Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

64 



817. Clarinet, Tenor, in F. — English maker, Key. Lent by Rev. F. 

W, Galpin. 

c. 1820. 

818. Clarinet in C, with two keys. — Denner's first model. Lent by 

Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

819. Clarinet Walking Stick. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

820. Clarinet, Bass, with twisted tube. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

821. Clarinet, Bass, in B flat, English. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

c. 1850. 

822. Clarinet in C, Boxwood, eight keys. 

Inscription on bell, " Grantham Band, 1828." Lent by 
Mr. Oscar W. Street. 

823. Clarinet in A, with five keys. — Early model, English, Lent 

by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

824. Clarinet, Boxwood, mounted in Ivory. Maker, Key. Lent 

by Mr. T. A. Harper. 

825. Clarinet.— Small F Clarinet. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

826. Basset Horn in F. By Grundman. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

Dresden, c. 1780. 

827. Basset Horn in F. — Chromatic. Lent by Rev., F. W. Galpin, 

1810. 

828. Tenoroon in B flat. — English (a predecessor of the Saxophone). 

Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1815. 

Double Reeds. 

829. Cromome, Tenor. — Reproduction. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

830. Cromome. Lent by Rev. T. W. Galpin. 

831. Eackett, Alto.— Reproduction. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

832. Conrtaud, Bass. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

833. Whit-Horn, English. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

834. Schalmeys.— Set o£ three. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

835. Schalmey, German. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

836. Watchman's Pipe, English. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

c. 1675. 

837. Pommer, Alto.— As used in the 16th Century. Lent by 

. Rev. F. W. Galpin.. 

65 



838. Bombardt, Breton. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

839. Musette, French.— 17th century. Lent by Mr. C. Van Raalte. 

840. Oboe d'Amore, Alto, in A, French. Lent by Rev. F. W, 

Galpin. 

c 1720. 

841. Cor Anglais. — Curved form, by Fornari. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

Venice, c. 1750. 

842. Cor Anglais. — Bent form, by Kuss. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

Veinna, c. 1810. 

843. Cor Anglais. — Curved form. Maker, Triebert, Paris. Lent 

by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

844. Oboe, Tenor, in F, English. — 18th century. Lent by Rev. 

F. W. Galpin. 

845. Oboe, Bass, in C, English. — 18th century. Lent by Rev. 

F. W. Galpin. 

846. Oboe with three keys, English. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1800. 

847. Oboe, English.— Maker, Ruster. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

848. Hautboy. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

849. Hautboy, Old English.— Maker, Collier. Lent by Mr. T. L. 

Southgate. 

1820. 

850. Hautboys, two old English (or |Waits). Lent by Christ 

Church College, Oxford. 

851. Oboe, with two keys, by T. Stanesby. Lent by Col. T. B. 

Shaw-Hellier. 

c. 1750. 

852. Fagott in G. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin: 

c. 1600. 

853. Octave Bassoon in C. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1680. 

854. Bassoon in C, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1747. 

855. iiuinte, or Tenor Bassoon, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

1750. 

856. Bassoon, 16 keys. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

857. Bassoon, 1 1 keys. — Maker, Corcoran, Dublin. Lent bv 

Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. ' 

858. Bassoon, nine keys. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

66 



Cornetto Type. 

859. Cornetto or Zinke, Italian. — 16th century. Lent by Mr. 

George Donaldson. 

860. Cornetto curvo, Alto, in A. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

861. Cornetto curvo. — Reproduction by Mabillon, Brussels. Lent by 

' Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

862. Cornetto muto, Treble in D, English.— 17th century. Lent 

by the Rev. F. W. Gilpin. 

863. Cornetto muto, Tenor in G. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin, 

864. Cornetto tortO, Bass in C. Lent by the Rev. F, W. Galpin. 

865. Cornetto torto, Basso. — 17th century. Lent by Col. Shaw- 

Hellier. 

866. Serpent, silver mounts, made in Paris. Lent by Col. Shaw- 

Hellier. 

867. Serpent. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

Dent, 1 
jalpin. 



868. Serpent, with iour keys, English. Lent by the Rev, F. W; 
Ga" " 



1800. 

869. Serpent. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin, 

c. 1700. 

870. Horn Bass. — Jas. Friday. Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

871. Ophicleide, by J. Park. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

872. Ophicleide, Bass in C. English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

1820. 

873. Bass Horn, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1800. 

Horn and Bugle Type. 

874. Forester's Horn, English. — 18th Century. Lent by the Rev. 

F. W. Galpin. 

875. Postilion's Horn, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1700. 

876. Bacchic Horn. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

877. Shophar Eam's Horn. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

878. Oliphant Hunting Horn, Ivory. — 17th Century. Lent by the 

Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

879. Hunting Horn in F, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

1699. 

67 



880. Horns, pair of Orchestral. — John Christopher Hofmeister. 

Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

881. Orchestral Horn, English. — 18th Century. Lent by the Rev. 

F. W. Galpin. 

882. Cornet, with Disc Valves. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

883. Cornet, Two Valves. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

884. Wardmote Horn. — Maker (Swiss). Lent by Miss E. A. 

Willmott. 

1475. 

885. Bugle, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 1800. 

886. Bugle. — Key or Kent, six keys, in C, by Turton. Halliday's 

Patent. Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

887. Bugle, six keys, in C, by G. Smith. Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

888. Bugle, six keys, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1825. 

889. Cornet-a-piston, by G. Smith, Birmingham. Lent by Col. 

Shaw-Hellier. 

890. Cornet, Rotary Piston, by Kohler. Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

891. Cornet, by R. Bradshaw. Dublin, Patent, 1845. Lent by Col. 

Shaw-Hellier. 

Cup Mouthpieces. 

(With Cylindrical Tube.) 

892. Slide Trumpet, early pattern, English. Lent by the Rev. F. 

W. Galpin. 

893. Straight Trumpet, German. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1460. 

894. Hand Trumpet. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpm. 1780. 

895. Trumpet, five keys. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin 

896. Trumpet, three valves. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 1845. 

897. Tromha. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

898. Clarino, German, 1650. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

899. Old Nuremberg Trumpet. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

900. Trumpet. Maker, Harris. Lent by Mr. T. A. Harper. 

901. An Ancient Trumpet. — Copper, mounted with silver, 16 inches 

longer than those of present time, suggestive of the rise in 
pitch. Maker, Bull. Lent by Mr. T. A. Harper. 

«.-. 1700. 

902. Trumpet in D, silver. London, Hofmeister. Lent by Col. 

Shaw-Hellier. 

68 



903. Trumpet Slide, with spring attachment and tuning arrange- 

ment by J. Goodison, London, Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

904. Trumpet, with two horizontal valves. — Maker, Charles Pace. 

Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

1840. 

905. Trumpets, pair of, in D. — Nicholas Winkings. Lent by 

Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

906. Trumpet. — A Walking-stick Trumpet invented by T. Harper. 

Maker, Kohler. This instrument possesses all the fixed tones 
of the Trumpet in a superior degree. Lent by Mr. T. A. 
Taylor. 

c. 1835. 

Bagpipes. 

907. Bagpipes, small French, ivory. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

908. Bagpipe, small French. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

909. Spanish Bagpipes. Lent by Mr. John Glen. 

910. Cornemuse, French. — 17th Century. Mr. C. Van Raalte. 

Keyboard Instruction. 

911. Portative Organ. — 16th Century. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin, 

912. Bible Begal. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 1620. 

913. Bible Regal. Lent by Mrs. F. J. Pagden. 

914. Accordion, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 1835. 

915. Clarinetta. — Keyboard free reed instrument. Maker, Evans. 

Lent by Miss G. C. Place. 

916. Water Organ, Model of Ancient. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 



69 



Instruments of Percussion. 

at 

PREFACE. 

WE are indebted to the Orientals for our 
knowledge of instruments of this kind, 
which have been in use from very early 
times. With the exception of the Kettledrum, no 
great improvement has been made in them by 
Western nations. 

They can only be called " musical instruments " 
by courtesy, as none of them (again excepting the 
Kettledrum and the Glockenspiel) produce sounds of 
definite pitch. They are, however, valuable as 
emphasising accent and rhythmic patterns. The 
membrane is to these instruments what the reed 
is to the wind and the cord to the stringed 
instruments — the source of the sound — vibration. 
The membrane may be stretched either on a hoop as 
in the tambourine, in which case the simple sound of 
the skin is alone produced, or this sound may be 
intensified by a resonator as in the Drum. 

The simplest form of Drum is the Tabor, which 
in conjunction with a little pipe, was much used 300 
years ago at rural merry-makings, such as Morris 
Dancing (specimens are in the Exhibition). The 
performer held the pipe in his left hand, and the 
Tabor was suspended by a string from the little 
finger, being struck by a drumstick held in the right 
hand. The Side Drum or Military Drum derives 
its characteristic rasping nasal tone partly from its 
shallow depth, partly from a double strand of catgut 
(called the " snares ") stretched across the lower of its 
two heads. 

The ordinary Drum, called in the orchestra the 
Bass-Drum or Grosse caisse, is chiefly used in military 
bands to mark, by its powerful thud, the time in 

'71 



marching. As with other instruments of its class, it 
is effective in inverse proportion to the frequency of 
its employment. It may be described as a short 
section of a large cylinder with a parchment head at 
either end, tightened by a bracing of cords from one 
to the other. The larger the drum, the better the 
sound. 

The Kettledrum is a cauldron-shaped vessel of 
copper covered in with parchment, which can be 
stretched more or less tightly by screws placed round 
the circumference, the membrane yielding then a 
higher or lower definite note. In cavalry bands two 
drums are used, one on each side of the horse's neck. 
In orchestras two drums are required (of different 
sizes), and often three are used. The larger of the 
two drums should be able to go down to F, and the 
smaller to the F above, giving a range of an octave 
to the two. 

Included in what the French call the " batterie " 
are the Cymbals— circular plates of hammered gun- 
metal which ought to be played with a brushing 
instead of a hitting movement — the Triangle, the 
Tambourine — which may be played in several ways, 
either struck, shaken, or lightly rubbed with the 
fingers so that the head and "gingles" both sound. 
Castanets, Carillon or Glockenspiel, a series of small 
steel bars struck with a hammer, Xylophone or 
wooden Harmonica like the carillon, but with bars of 
hard wood, Typhophone or Celesta with the same 
principle applied to the keyboard, and Gong, used only 
for melodramatic effects, as in the Finale to the Fourth 
Symphony of Tschaikowsky. 

ERNEST CLARKE. 



72 



Percussion. 



917. Drum, large Tambourine and Case. Lent by Col. T. B. 

Shaw-Hellier. 

c 1750. 

918. Tabor Pipe and Drum. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

919. Xylophone, used in Band of 4th Dragoon Guards. Lent by 

Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

1824. 

920. Typophone by V. Mustel, Paris. The sound is obtained from 

steel tuning forks fixed on resonators, dampers being attached 
to the bars and resonators. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

921. Large Military Tambourine. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw- 

Hellier 

c. 1750. 

922. Tenor Drum. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. c. 1735. 

923. Pair of small Kettledrums. Lent by Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

c. 1735. 

924. Pipe and Tabor and two sets of Bells worn on the knees of 

the Morris Dancers. — Belonged to Thomas Humphries, of 
Witney Oxon., and was played by him at most of the Morris 
Dances in the villages and towns of Oxfordshire for nearly 40 
years. Lent by Mr. W. Taphouse. 

c. 1820. 

925. Bass Drum from the Battlefield of Waterloo (7th— Queen's 

Own — Hussars). Lent by Messrs. Mahillon & Co. 

926. Sistrum, Grseco-Roman. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

927. Glass Harmonica, English. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1800. 

928. Nail Harmonica, German, with bow. Lent by the Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

929. Keyed Glockenspiel. Lent by the Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

930. Old Drum, with Tudor Arms painted on it. Lent by Mr. 

Seymour Lucas, R.A. 

931. Side Drum, Italian.— Used by the Papal Guard- of Pope 

Innocent X., 1644-55, whose Coat of Arms is on side. Lent 
by Mr. C. Van Raalte. 

73 

E 2 



Organs and other Instruments 

CONTAINING 

Organ Pipes or Tongues of Metal. 

PREFACE. 

THE origin of the Organ is lost in remote antiquity. 
The idea, however, of a polyphonic instrument, 
suggested by the primitive pan-pipe, or the 
association of two reed pipes placed in the mouth 
together, and yet further improved by the addition 
of a wind reservoir as in the bagpipe, must have 
taken some practical shape before Ctesibries, in 
the- early part of the third century B.C., produced 
his hydraulus or water organ. In fact, it is more 
than probable that the invention of this celebrated 
mechanician chiefly existed in applying the prin- 
ciple of water pressure and a new slider or key 
action to some crude form of pneumatic organ. 
His work, nevertheless, stands as the earliest example 
yet known of the instrument, and from the description 
given by his friend Hero of Alexandria, it is evident 
that the water was used to compress the air in the 
same way as in the modern instruments weights are 
employed. The key mechanism at first was improved 
by later makers — ranks of pipes, both flue and reed, 
were added — and at the commencement of our era we 
have a complete organ furnished with a practical key- 
board for the fingers, and supplied with stops. This 
was the instrument so enthusiastically described by 
Roman poets and technical writers, and closely asso- 
ciated with the games and musical contests of the 
imperial days.* 

* A working reproduction of the ancient hydraulus is included 
in the Exhibition. The details have been copied from a pottery model 
of the instrument discovered at Carthage, and it is constructed from 
the descriptions given by Hero (B.C. 200) and Litruvius (a.d. 180), 
and dating from the early part of the second century a.d. A full 
description, with illustrations and diagrams, will be found in " The 
Reliquary," July, 1904. 

75 



It was probably for this reason especially that 
under Christian influence the water organ was practi- 
cally banished from Italy: the only accompaniment 
allowed in the churches being the kithara; and 
although by the end of the sixth century some 
recollection still lingered in Western Europe of the 
principle employed, the more minute details of keys 
and stops were altogether lost. When the pneumatic 
organ appears as an element in Christian worship, it 
is without the refined elaboration of the imperial 
hydraulus ; and it was left for the musicians and 
makers of the twelfth or thirteenth centuries to re- 
discover the keyboard, and for a later century still the 
use of different ranks of pipes by means of stops. 
Not until the close of the seventeenth century, or 
early years of the eighteenth century, did the air- 
reservoir, heavily weighted to give the required pres- 
sure, come once more into use, superseding the 
numerous hand or foot bellows — now technically called' 
"feeders" — which had become the cumbrous adjunct 
to all the larger instruments. 

In the Middle Ages portable organs were much 
used. The smallest form was termed "The Portative," 
and, suspended by a strap across the shoulder, could 
be carried and played at the same time by the 
performer ; it is frequently associated in painting 
with St. Cecilia. Another form, somewhat larger, 
was called " The Positive," for though it could be 
moved from place to place with assistance, it had to 
be " set down " during the performance. Yet a third 
kind was " The Regal," which generally consisted 
of a single reed stop, but in some cases was enlarged 
into a Positive by the addition of other stops and 
pipes. The small Positives were described as " single" 
organs, and the compass descended only to Tenor C ; 
the larger were "double organs," reaching Bass C, 
(the CC of the old English Tablature). Probably the 
term "a pair of organs " refers to the larger kind. 

The use of these portable instruments was 
unfortunately set aside by the introduction of the 
"orgue expressif" or harmonium. The "free reed," 
as it is called in contradistinction to the true organ 
" beating " reed with which the Regal was furnished, 



was known in Europe in the seventeenth century, 
as Mersenne in 1635 published an illustration of 
the Burmese "Phau": but the principle remained 
unnoticed and unused till the end of the eighteenth 
century, when Pere Amiot sent from China to the 
French Secretary of State two " chengs " or Chinese 
mouth organs, and drew his attention to then- 
capabilities. The result was the invention of the 
"orgue expressif." Towards the close of the last 
century an improved form called the "American 
organ " appeared ; but, with its principle of inhalation, 
it is really a return to the primitive cheng. Between 
the free-reed and the metal tongues of the musical 
box there is a close analogy, the latter being set 
in vibration by "plucking," the other by a current 
of air: in neither case is a pipe or tube, as in the 
true organ reed, necessary. 

An interesting form of reed is the diaphone of 
Mr. Hope Jones, which in its action is very similar 
to the movement of the lips when a brass or cup- 
mouthpieced instrument is being sounded. This 
principle might be usefully extended to represent 
more closely the horn, trumpet, and trombone tones 
in the modern organ. 

It is impossible to record here the many improve- 
ments effected in organ-building and arrangement 
during the last three centuries.* In all large instru- 

*The following are some of the more important improve- 
ments generally adopted since 1604: — 

c. 1661. "Shifting" compaction Pedals employed by 

Dallam. 
C. 1675. Diagonal Wind Reservoir used in small organs. 
1712. A "Sliding Swell" attached to the Echo Organ by 

A. Jordan. 
1762. The Horizontal Wind Reservoir invented by 
Cummins. 
c. 1780. The "Venetian Swell" adapted from the Harpsi- 
chord by Green. 
c. 1790. Pedals introduced into England. 

1809. Compaction Pedals improved by Bishop. 

1826. Bishop's " Concussion" Bellows to equalize pressure. 

1832. Barker's Pneumatic key action. 

1847. The "Tubular Pneumatic" action of Montessien. 

i860. Hydraulic Motor invented by Joy. 

1867-8. Electricty applied to key action by Barker, 

Bryeeson and Willis. 
1871. Pneumatic compaction knobs. 
1881. Electrc.Pneumatic action of Schmole and Mols. 

77 



ments the old tracker action has been superseded 
by tubular-pneumatic or electro-pneumatic connec- 
tions; motors, not men, now supply the wind. 
Quite a large variety of different qualities of tone 
have been employed from the pipes employed, and 
the cjompass is only limited by the inability of the 
human ear to appreciate the vast range of sound 
which the organ could afford. 

F. w. GALPIN. 



Organ. 

932. Pitch Pipe— Lent by Colonel T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 1750. 

933. Pitch Pipe for giving note to lead psalmody in churches. Lent 

by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

934. Round Pitch Pipe (beaked).— Lent by Miss E..A. Willmott. 

,935. Organ Pipes, ancient and modern, illustrating the varieties of 
*> shape and character. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

936. Bird Organ. — Miniature instrument, 8J-in. in height, ilj-in. in 
length, and 7-in. in depth ; in wooden case. Sound produced 
by 12 wooden pipes worked by a barrel, and turned by handle. 
Presented by George III. to one of his servants. The tunes 
played, eight in number, are as follows: — (i) "King of 
Prussia's Minuet " ; (2) " La Promenade " ; (3) " Miss 
Musgrave's Fancy " ; (4) " The Waterman " ; (5) " He is 
aya kissing me"; (6) " Le Contrefaite " ; (7) "Scotch 
Bonnet"; and (8) "A Spanish March." Lent by Mr. H. 
Snelling. 



79 



Flutes, Hautboys, Clarionets, and 
Similar Wind Instruments. 



PREFACE. 

IN ancient Greek times the word "aulos," commonly 
translated "flute," appears to have been used 
in a very general way, and indeed usually 
signified an instrument in which a reed was employed 
as the medium for production of tone. Confining 
Our attention, however, to the period covered by the 
history of this Company, the name flute has always 
signified an instrument in which a lamina of air is 
employed to excite vibrations in the tube. This 
air reed proceeds either direct from the nearly closed 
lips, or from a slit in a mouth-piece of the whistle 
type. Although there is but little evidence of the 
use of the lips in ancient times, exactly as required 
by the modern transverse flute, yet it is certain that 
the lips were used to produce a current directly 
across a cut reed or tube in the ancient Egyptian 
ney, and therefore it is impossible to state whether 
the whistle or the lip-blown flute is the older form. 

The modern transverse flute was preceded by 
the flute with a whistle mouth-piece, known as the 
fipple-flute or recorder, or by the French name, 
flute-a-bec, now surviving only in the flageolet and 
the penny whistle. Although flutes on this principle 
were made in families and covered a far greater range 
of compass downwards than the modern transverse 
flutes, yet the lack of artistic capability in their tone 
fully accounts for their disappearance. Contrasted 
with these, the instrument now known as the flute, 
possesses in a high degree the power of yielding 
every gradation of tone and expression. 

The transverse flute in its simplest form was a 
cylindrical tube with a mouth-hole or embouchure 

81 



near the stopped end, and six ringer holes. Such a 
form, owing to the partial closing at the mouth-hole, 
does not give the octaves obtained by overflowing 
true to their primes, and th-i correction of this defect 
resulted in the " cone " flute in which the lower two- 
thirds of the tube is slightly conical. About the 
middle of last century Theobald Boehm reverted to 
the cylindrical form for this portion of the flute, and 
obtained the necessary correction of intonation by 
giving a conical bore with a slight parabolic curvature 
to the head end of the instrument. He also devised 
or systematized principles of key work which have 
gradually come into very general use, so that his 
" cyclinder " flute, more or less modified, now holds 
the chief position among orchestral players : the 
" cone " flute being used principally in military 
bands. 

The sum of the matter and the final result of the 
various changes during the last three or four hundred 
years is the disappearance of the recorder, the 
elimination of the " fipple " flute, and the acceptance 
of the transverse flute as the only form of the 
instrument suitable for artistic purposes. 



Reed Instruments. 

In reed instruments there is no such simplicity as 
has been noticed in the flutes, for although certain old' 
forms as the krumm-horn or Cromorne have passed 
out of use, their places have been taken by others, 
and our present reed instruments cover a wide field, 
both in compass and variety of quality. Of the 
double reed, the mediaeval shawm has resulted in 
the delicate modern oboe, and the pommers in the 
bassoons and contra-fagotti. These are conical instru- 
ments in which the octave and twelfth of the prime 
can be produced as on the flute. The saxophones 
form the most modern family of conical reed instru- 
ments, and these have single reeds, much like those 
of the clarionet, and by these a new quality of tone 
has been introduced midway in character between 
the general " wood-wind " tone and the " brass." 

82 



The clarionet, invented in 1690, by Denner, of 
Nuremberg, remains, however, the most important 
instrument of the wood-wind group, and possesses 
the distinctive feature that the octave and other even- 
numbered harmonics are absent or but very faint 
in its tone. The great interval of a twelfth that 
has therefore to be bridged over by holes covered 
with the fingers or key work has led to the applica- 
tion of much ingenious mechanism, not merely for 
convenience of fingering, as on the flute and the 
oboe, but to make at all possible the production of 
the chromatic scale through the interval of a twelfth 
by means of ten "fingers, of which at least one is 
required for the support of the instrument. - 

D. I. BLAIKLEY. 



83 



SPECIAL CASE. 

(Messrs. BOOSEY & Co.) 

Flutes. 

937. Double Flageolet, nine keys. — Maker, Simpson. 

933. Flute-a-bec, three keys. — By Bainbridge & Wood. This 
instrument is blown from the side. 

939. Piccolo in D, six silver keys. — Formerly the property of R. S. 

Pratten. 

940. Flute in F, Cocus descending to D flat. — Maker, Monzani. 

941. Flute, Concert, Ivory, with one silver key. 

942. Flute in F, four silver keys, with metal plugs. 

943. Flute, Concert, Cocus, nine silver keys. — Maker, Monzani. 

944. Flute, in B flat, Cocus, five silver keys. — Maker, Monzani. 

Bagpipes. 

945. Set of Northumbrian Pipes (with bellows). — German silver 

and ivory mounts. 

946. Set of Miniature Highland Pipes. 

947. Set of Half-size or Reel Pipes. 

948. Set of Irish or Union Pipes (with bellows). — This instrument 

has a set of drones, with keys, which are swept by the arm to 
produce chords. 

Double Reed Instruments. 

949. Musette, Boehm system, by Triebert. 

950. Cor Anglais, three brass keys, by Longman & Broderip. 

951. Cor Anglais in G, by Brod. 

952. Oboe, Boxwood, with two silver keys on knobs, by Robert 

Cotton. 

953. Oboe, Boxwood, with seven silver keys on knobs, by W. Mill- 

house. 

954. Tenoroon in F, ten brass keys on boxes. 

955. Bassoon, Maplewood, twelve brass keys on boxes. 

956. Sarrusophone, Tenor, in E Flat, eighteen brass keys. 

957. Sarrusophone, Baritone, in B Flat, plated. 

85 



Single Reed Instruments. 

958. Clarinet in C, Boxwood, with six brass keys.— Maker, Otten. 

959. Clarinet in C, Ebony.— Formerly the property of Sir William 

Sterndale Bennett, and used in the' Band of 1st Life Guards 
during the Waterloo campaign. 

960. Clarinet in B flat, Boxwood, with thirteen silver keys, by Boose. 

Exhibited at Hyde Park Exhibition, 1851. 

961. Corno-di-Basseto, or Basset Horn. — Formerly the property of 

Mr. Lazarus. 

Instruments with Cup-shaped Mouthpieces. 

962. French Horn .in E flat, by Distin. 

963. Serpent, Brass, with six finger-holes and two keys. 

964. Serpent, Wood, with twelve brass keys. 

965. Horn, Bass, Brass, with six finger-holes and four keys. 

966. Bugle, Copper, with six. 

967. Ophicleide, Tenor, in E flat, with eleven keys. Nickel-plated. 

968. Cornet in B flat. — Early French model. 

969. Cornet in B flat, with B flat shake-key. 

970. Cornet in B flat, with early pattern valves, by Sax. 

971. Flugel in B flat, with four rotary cylinders. 

972. Bombardon in E flat, with four early pattern piston valves, 

by Sax. 

973. Trumpets, pair of, Old German, by " Georg Lintner, in 

Augsburg," dated 1796. 

974. Trombone Slide, Old German, by " Anton Kerner, in Wien," 

dated 1770. 

SPECIAL. CASE. 

(Messrs. RUDALL. CARTE & Co.) 

975. Fife. — Maker, Key. Used originally by the Swiss Military 

Bands, and for three or four centuries by British Army Bands. 

976. Eecorder. — Flute-a-bec. 17th century. 

977. Flute, four keys.— Maker, Wafford. 

1770-80. 

978. Flute, Boxwood.— Maker, Potter. 

c. 1805. 

86 



979. Concert Piute, Ebony.— Maker, Monzani. 

c. 1808. 

980. Flute, Cocus wood, eight keys. — Maker, Key. 

c. 1818. 

981. Concert Flute, Ebony, six keys.— Maker, Monzani. 

«.-. 1808. 

982. Bass Flute.— Maker, Wigley & McGregor, patented. 

1810. 

983. German Flute, one key. — Maker, Willis. 

1810-15. 

984. Glass Flute, six keys. — Maker, Laurent. 

1812. 

985. Double Flageolet. — Maker, Hastrick. 

1830. 

986. Flute, Ebony, eight keys. — Maker, Drouet. 

1818. 

987. Flute, Boxwood, eight keys. — Maker, Rudall & Rose. 

1825. 

988. Flute, Ebony, fourteen keys. — Maker, Koch, Vienna. This 

in^trumtnt belonged to the eminent flautist, Sedlatzek. 

1830. 

989. Concert Flute, Cocus wood, with new mechanism. — Maker, 

Cornelius Ward. Patented. 

1842. 

990. Flute d'amour, Cocus wood. — Maker, Cornelius Ward. 

1842. 

991. Concert Flute. — Maker, Monzani. 

c. 1807. 

992. Tenor Flute.— Maker, R. Burleigh. 

1855. 

993. Bass Flute.— Maker, R. Burleigh. 

1855. 

994. Clarinet, Boxwood, five keys. — Maker, Cramer. 

1770. 

995. Clarinet, E flat, Boxwood, six brass keys. — Maker, Astor. 

London, 1803. 

996. Clarinet, Boxwood, five keys. — Maker, Cramer. 

1810-20. 

997. Clarinet, Boxwood, seven keys. — Maker, Key. 

• 1820-30. 

998. Corno di Bassetto — Maker, Key. 

1830. 

999. Oboe, Boxwood. — Maker, Power. 

c. 1820. 

1000. Bassoon, four keys.— Maker and date unknown. 

S7 



1001. Bassoon, nine keys. — Maker, Cramer & Key. 

Before 1802. 

1002. Faggottino. — Maker, Key. 

1815. 

1003. Concert Flute, Ebony. — Maker, Gerock. 

c. 1836. 
1001. Concert Flute, Ivory, four keys. — Maker, Cahusac. 

c, 1820. 

1005. Concert Flute, ten holes and one key. 

1855. 

1006. Concert Flute, ten holes and one key. 

1855. 

1007. Fife, eleven holes, no keys. — Maker, Prowse. 

18E5. 

1008. Clarinet, Boxwood, six brass keys. — Maker, Astor. 

1803. 

1009. Oboe, Rosewood, two keys. — Maker, Cahusac. 

London, c. 1820. 

1010. Triple Flageolet.— Maker, Bainbridge. 

1800. 

1011. Oboe in B flat.— Maker, Triebert. 

1012. Oboe, Bass.— Maker, Triebert. 

1013. Ty — Chinese Flute. 

1014. Fango FangO. — Nose Flute, from Otaheite. 

1015. Quadrille Flageolet, Boxwood.— Maker, D'Almaine. 

1850. 

1016. Oboe, Boxwood, two keys. — Maker, Goulding. 

c. 1840. 

1017. Clarinet, Boxwood, with brass keys. — Maker, Key. Formerly 

the property of Mr. Lazarus. 

London, c. 1840. 

1018. Clarinet, Boxwood, with brass keys. — Maker, Key. Formerly 

the property of Mr. Lazarus. 

London, c. 1830. 

1019. Clarinet, Cocus wood, German silver keys, by Clinton. — 

Formerly the property of the late Mr. Lazarus. 

c. 1847-57. 

1020. Glass Flute, seven keys. — Maker, Laurent. 

1817. 

1021. Concert Flute, eight Keys.— Maker, Clementi & Co. 

1822 

1022. Ophicleide, Tenor, French. 

1840. 

1023. Keyed Bugle— Maker, Kohler. 

1850. 

1024. Basson, eight keys. — Maker, Goulding. 

c. 1820-1830. 

1025. Flute-a-bec, Ivory. — Maker, Kranz. 



Stringed Instrument with a Keyboard. 



PREFACE. 

FROM the Pianoforte of to-day, the household 
orchestra as it has been termed, to its remote 
prototype is a long, long way. Yet the steps 
by which the Dulcimer of the ancient nations has 
become developed into the Pianoforte are not difficult 
to trace, although we cannot say for certain who was 
the inventor of each one of the improvements found 
in the popular instrument now placed at the service 
of Music. 

Historically the pianoforte dates back to Assyrian 
times — its ancestor was the dulcimer, apparently 
a favourite instrument of this people. In the 
Assyrian room at the British Museum will be 
found some of the massive stone sculptures brought 
by Layard from the mound of Kouyunjik. This 
portion of Nineveh was built by Sargon 700 B.C. On 
some of the slabs are seen processions in which 
musicians play an important part ; among these are 
performers on the dulcimer, for the convenience of 
marching, the instrument is attached by a string to 
the waist, and the players appear to be striking the 
strings with hammers at the end of sticks held in 
their hands. 

A dulcimer may be defined as a quadrilateral 
sound-box across which strings are stretched resting 
on bridges ; this applies to pianofortes of to-day, 
the main difference being that our instrument 
possesses keys controlling the hammers, whereas the 
dulcimer players keep the hammer-sticks in their 
hands, and do not depend upon mechanism to strike 

89 



the strings. The principle of tone production is 
identical in both cases. The dulcimer under^ various 
names is still popular, and is to be found in every 
civilised country. 

It is certain that a keyboard was known to the 
Greeks and Romans, for their so-called Water Organs 
were furnished with keys for the fingers. In all 
probability this simple device of a balanced lever 
passed out of mind in consequence of the troubles and 
darkness which ensued on the invasion of Italy by the 
Goths and Vandals in the early Christian era. Art 
and learning died ; they did not revive from their 
long sleep until hundreds of years after the sacking of 
Imperial Rome. The lever key, one end for the 
finger and the. other for the hammer, had to be 
re-invented. In the case of .the clavier instruments 
strung with catgut or wire, two distinct types of 
mechanism were employed. One, derived from the 
action of plucking the string of the harp by the finger, 
gave us the virginal, spinet, and harpsichord ; the other, 
following the practice of the dulcimer players, took 
the form of a " tangent " by way of hammer, which 
struck a blow, and so caused the string to sound. 
But the vibration did not last long, the string was 
not free — it was held tight as long as the finger kept 
the key down ; thus the tone was feeble and 
evanescent. Not quite so in the case of those 
instruments where the string was plucked ; a. simple 
piece of mechanism termed a " jack," furnished with 
a piece of leather or quill attached to its tongue plucked 
the string, as was done by the plectrum in the cithara 
of the Greeks ; thus a more sustained sound was 
produced, until the descent of the key brought a little 
piece of cloth on to the string and the sound was 
damped. 

These two types of a keyed dulcimer ran side by 
side for hundreds of years, and not a little beautiful 
and interesting music was written for the instruments. 
They supplied the wants of the creators of music of 
the day, yet to a great extent they lacked what we 
deem the soul of music, viz., expression. In the 
harpsichord clever makers employed ingenious devices 
for varying the tone quality, but in all these 

90 



instruments dynamic expression— i.e., the power of 
producing either a loud or a soft note, as the 
performer desired— was impossible. We know that the 
clavichord and the virginal were in use in 1400, the 
two types continuing to be made until the beginning 
of the last century. Recognising their imperfections, ■ 
it seems strange that they could have outlived the 
invention of the pianoforte proper by more than a 
hundred years. 

The mechanical principle of this instrument is 
easy to understand. It is that of a free balanced 
hammer; in effect mechanism assists in doing just 
what the wrists of the dulcimer players perform. 
These men can just touch the strings, or hit them 
a severe blow, then immediately raising the hammer- 
stick so as to allow the string to sound freely until 
its vibrations come to an end. Thus piano forte (soft- 
loud), which we obtain now through the hammer with 
its escapement mechanism, exactly expresses what 
was achieved thousands of years ago by the dulcimer 
players. There have been doubts as to who first 
planned out this hammer with its graduated blow 
and immediate release so as to allow the string to 
vibrate freely. Various claims have been made for the 
invention. It was the opinion of the late A. J. 
Hipkins, than whom no greater authority on the 
history of the pianoforte ever lived, that it must be 
credited to Bartolomeo Cristofori, an Italian harp- 
sichord maker, and the date of 1709 is assigned to the 
invention. 

Considering that the balanced hammer de- 
vice meant all the difference between formal and 
artistically rendered music, it seems strange that the 
invention did not become immediately popular and 
spread widely. Yet it was not so. Frederici 
introduced it into Austria in 1758, Zumpe to England 
in 1760, and Erard to France in 1777 ; but the 
principle was the right one. As time went on 
composers and players appreciated this ; makers vied 
with one another in perfecting the hammer mechanism 
and making it obedient to the fingers of the players. 
Then with a new instrument of greatly extended 
compass new music arose ; the old types of plucking 

91 



the string, or striking it a feeble blow with a little 
metal tangent, fell into desuetude. Little by little the 
sensitiveness, the tone, and the sustaining effect of 
the pianoforte grew, and now we have acquired the 
splendid instrument of to-day, powerful, pure in tone, 
responsive to the touch, capable of perfect accent, and 
of as true artistic expression as can be obtained from 
a complete orchestra of many skilled instrumental 
players. 

T. L. SOUTHGATE. 



92 



Stringed Instruments. 

•«* 

Keyboard. 

1026. Virginal, Italian, interior of cover painted with amorini 

dancing, 17th century. Lent by Mr. C. van Raalte. 

1027. Clavichord, early English, by Hicke. Lent by Mr. T. L. 

Southgate. 

circa 1580. 

1028. Clavichord, Italian. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 1600. 

1029. Spinet, small, portable. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1030. Clavicytherium, Italian, 17th century. Lent by Rev. 

F. W. Galpin. 

1031. Virginal, with painted case, Italian, by Joseph Mondini, of 

Florence. Lent by Mr. A. Fuller Maitland. 

1631. 

1032. Virginal, coffer shaped. — Exhibited at South Kensington in 

1885, and described by its then owner as having belonged to 
Nell Gwyne. Made by Adam LiversMge. Lent by Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill. jggg 

1033. Clavecin, in decorated case, with painting inside top, by 

Ruckers the younger. Lent by the Countess of Dudley. 

1642. 

1034. Spinet, by John Hitchcock ; formerly the property of Handel. 

Lent by Miss Hipkins. 

1035. Spinet, by Hitchcock. Lent by Messrs. Broadwood & Sons. 

1710. 

1036. Spinet, English, by Harrie. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

1740. 

1037. Clavichord, painted and decorated, by Hasse. Lent by Sir 

Gervas Glyn, Bart. 

1038. Harpsichord, Italian, by . Lent by Mr. A. du Cros. 

1039. Harpsichord, Italian, by . Lent by Mr. A. du 

Cros. 

1040. Harpsichord, by Burhar Scudi and Johannes Broadwood. — Two 

manuals and Venetian swell. Lent by Messrs. Broadwood 
& Sons. 

1790. 

1041. Pianoforte, very early square, by Burhar Scudi and Johannes 

Broadwood. Lent by Messrs. Broadwood & Sons. 

1780. 

1042. Pianoforte, small conductors, by Broadwood, made for Sir 

Georg-e Smart. Lent by Messrs. Broadwood & Sons. 

fi 1805. 

93 



Special Case containing Instruments. 

Lent by the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

1043. Quinterna or Chiterna. — Tortoise-shell, incrusted with mytho- 

logic subjects in ivory and set with precious stones. Made by 
Joachim Tielke, Hamburg — German. Dated 1539- 

1044. Pandurina. — Beechwood, carved with strap and foliage work, 

having in the centre a group of Juno, Diana, and Venus ; on 
the back of the tuning-board is the head of Medusa in relief 
— French, about 1570. 

1045. Violin and Bow. — Wood, the back carved with scroll work, 

and the Royal shield of Great Britain and Ireland, with 
supporters, said to have belonged to James I. Early 17th 
century. 

1046. Chittarone. — A large Roman Theobo, inlaid with various 

woods and ivory, and furnished with three ornamental sound 
holes. It has two sets of tuning pegs for the eight steel bass 
strings, and the twelve catgut strings respectively. Made by 
Bueckenburg in Rome anno 16 14 — Italian. 

1047. Violo di Barone ; or Baryton with bow. The neck of carved 

and pierced boxwood terminating in a figure of Apollo playing 
the Lyre. The principal finger-board of ivory engraved and 
inlaid with ebony and tortoise-shell, with figures of Jupiter 
and Juno, and a Lady playing a Lute ; the second finger- 
board also of pierced and engraved ivory ; four catgut and 
fourteen metal sympathetic strings and double wrest. By 
Jaques Sainpra of Berlin. Said to have belonged to Guanz, 
music-master of Frederick the Great. German. 17th 
century. 

1048. Virginal; formerly belonging to Queen Elizabeth. Cedar- 

wood, the interior decorated with a band of arabesque 
painted in carmine and blue on a gold ground, and the front 
with panels of similar ornament, having also on the left the 
royal arms of Queen Elizabeth, and on the right a dove, 
crowned, holding a sceptre, and standing on a root of an oak 
tree. There are fifty keys with jacks and quills, thirty of 
them mounted with ebony, with stamped and gilt ornament 
on the ends, and the rest inlaid with silver, ivory, and various 
kinds of wood. The outer case is deal, covered with crimson 
velvet and lined with yellow silk, fitted with three engraved 
and gilt locked plates, and inside of the rising flaps orna- 
mented with flowers and tendrils in gold on a gold-sprinkled 
black ground. This instrument is described in the " Gentle- 
man's Magazine" for 1815 as having been sold about the 
year 1803 at Lord Spencer Chichester's sale at Fishwick, 
Staffordshire. It was purchased by the late owner about 
1842, from a person who stated that it came from Fishwick. 
Italian. Second half of 16th century. 

94 



Special Case containing Instruments. 

From the Victoria and Albert Museum. 
Lent by MR. GEORGE DONALDSON. 

1049. Spinet, Italian (Venetian) ; dated 1593. Made by Giovanni 

Celestini. 

1050. Pandurnia, Italian; 17th century. In tooled leather case 

said to have belonged to Eliots, the bandmaster of Charles I. 

1051. Viola Da Ganiba, Italian ; second half of 16th century. 

By Gaspar Duiffoprugcar, of Bologna. 

1052. Cetera, Italian ; second half of 1 6th century. By Gasparo 

Di Salo, of Brescia. 

1053. Violin Case, French ; late 17th or early 18th century. 

Covered with tooled and gilt red morocco. Said to have 
belonged to Louis XIV. 

1054. ComettO (Zinke), Italian. r6th century. 

1055. Theorbo, Italian. Signed " Giovanni Krebar et Andrea 

Jansen Padova, 1629." 

1056. Mandoline, Italian. 17th century. 

1057. Hnrdy-G-urdy, French. About 1700. 

1058. Cetera, Italian (probably Brescia). Second half of 16th 

century. 

1059. Guitar, German ; dated 1592. Made by Joachim Sielcke, of 

Hamburgh. Said to have belonged to Henri IV. 

1060. Virginal; formerly belonged to Queen Elizabeth. Italian; 

second half of 16th century. Bought £125, 1S87. 



95 



Stringed Instruments with a Bow. 



PREFACE. 

THE Violin, a word which may be taken to com- 
prehend all the members of the Violin family, 
was not the least of the precious possessions 
inherited from the workers of that most glorious of 
centuries — the sixteenth. It was not precisely an inven- 
tion ; it did not spring into existence fully equipped, 
like Minerva from the head of Jove. It was an evolution 
from instruments which already approached it in char- 
acter, and could it be interrogated no reply could be 
devised so apt as the immortal one of Topsy, " Specs I 
growed," the pity of it being that it has long since ceased 
to grow. A century and a half ago there was a deadlock 
in Violin making for which various reasons have been 
adduced. Fortunately for those who lived at that 
time the supply of good Violins had outstripped the 
demand — there was a plethora of them — and the artisti- 
cally minded craftsman found other fields of work 
more remunerative. So this noble craft, or, as Long- 
fellow calls it, "the lutist's art," fell into desuetude. 
Evolution gave way to devolution and there is cause 
to fear that future generations of violinists and violon- 
cellists will lack instruments to play upon capable of 
producing tone of the peculiar quality we associate 
with the word " Italian," a tone which is at once an 
education to the ear, an incentive to work, and a 
source of inspiration to the player. Already plethora 
has given place to famine; there are not enough fine 
Violins to go round, and exhibitions such as the 
Musicians' Company has gathered together are of in- 
creasing value each year we live. They are of almost 
painful interest, and it is well that museums and private 
.collections exist for the preservation of old instruments, 
" lest we forget," and whilst we await the renascence 
of a lost art. 

97 



But the aim of the Musicians' Company has not 
been to display endless specimens of " Strads " and 
" Josephs," but rather to make the Exhibition as far 
as possible of historical interest. The evolution from 
Viol to Violin, or from Gamba to 'Cello, the place 
taken by England in those days when a ■' chest of 
Viols " was the property of every gentleman, these are 
points which are illustrated in a manner which the 
student will appreciate, and perhaps also the general 
public, which seems to take keener interest in all that 
pertains to the Violin every year. Whereas a century 
ago the doings of great Violinists were of moment 
only to an esoteric circle, to-day the papers are. filled 
with the doings of Kubelik and Marie Hall, of Vecsey, 
or of whomever the latest prodigy may be, whilst the 
account of the Celebration of Dr. Joachim's Diamond 
Jubilee will have been read by millions. The question 
of the descent of the Violin is, one may reasonably 
hope, of considerable interest to the bulk of the 
visitors to this Exhibition. 

The exhibits will of course speak for themselves, 
but it may be pointed out that the Lyra di braccio, 
made in Brescia in 1535, and considered by experts to 
be the immediate predecessor of the Violin, is worthy 
of especial attention. Like most of the great luthiers 
of the past, Gioan Maria (the name is to be seen on 
the label — an original one) was a good artist as well 
as craftsman, the head, a Volute covered with 
arabesques, being of considerable artistic merit. Full 
particulars of this instrument are found in the archives 
at Brescia. The Knee Viols, or Viole da gamba, 
exhibited include one without a soundpost — "a body 
without a soul," our French neighbours would say. 
The fact that with them this adjunct, or connecting 
rod between upper and lower tables, is known as 
I'&me du Violon (the soul of the Violin) is proof 
convincing that it has hitherto been considered in- 
dispensable, and when one realises from this instrument 
that the ancients did altogether without it in the first 
instance, it comes as a shock to preconceived notions. 
It widens the gap, already considerable in the matter 
of toncvolume, between Gamba and 'Cello. 

Gasparo da Salo (born 1542) is well represented 
at this Exhibition, It is well to point out that this 

98 



maker's real name was Gaspar Bertolettis, a fact 
recently discovered in the course of researches directed 
by Messrs. Hill. Lady Huggins, the accomplished 
wife of the present President of the Royal Society, is 
shortly bringing out a book on the " ancestors of the 
Violin," which will be welcomed by all interested in 
the subject. Salo is merely the name of a town in the 
province of Brescia, in which Gasparo was born. It 
is proved by the Corporation records that music, 
especially sacred music, was much cultivated there in 
the sixteenth century. The work of the great luthiers 
of Italy was the outcome of the interest taken in 
music by the people and by Holy Church, and the 
influence of the superb instruments made, opening up 
as they did new possibilities, reacted in turn upon the 
music composed. We see of Gaspar's make in this 
Exhibition a Viol da gamba, originally brought from 
the Cathedral at Burgos, two of the Violas for which 
he was so famous, and a Violin. • He made few 
Violins, and of those known to exist some are of 
doubtful authenticity. In the latter category must be 
included the instrument which formerly belonged to 
Ole Bull, the Norwegian Virtuoso. This specimen 
bears no date, and has varnish on the back, which 
recalls that of Stradivarius at the period when he was 
momentarily influenced by Gasparo's pupil, Gio. Paolo 
Maggini. 

Made at the same period is a small Violin, 
13^ inches long, signed by Andreas Amati, 1564, 
also noteworthy for the excellence of its varnish. 
It is probably one of the Violini piccoli for which 
a part written for a violin, strung a third higher, 
is so often found in the scores of Bach, and it is 
now of interest as being one of the ancestors of the 
Amati violins which subsequently made the reputation 
of the Cremona school. 

Several Viole da Gamba of English make are 
exhibited, made at a time when England had con- 
siderable musical reputation abroad. The names 
Henry Jay, Baruk Norman, Kaye, and John Pitts 
are of strongly British flavour, but their instruments 
were much sought after at one time on the Con- 
tinent. 



Those interested in old violins and kindred 
instruments, and desirous of reading them up, should' 
consult the admirable bibliography for which violono- 
philes have to thank Mr. Heron Allen, "De Fidiculis." 
Since its publication the literature of the Violin has 
had a further noteworthy addition in " The Life of 
Stradivari," by the Brothers Hill, which should also 
be read. But more instructive than books are the 
instruments which have been gathered together on 
this interesting occasion. 

W. W. COBBETT. 



100 



Stringed Instruments played with a 

Bow. 

A collection of Italian Instruments illustrating the evolution of the 

Violin. 

1061. Lyra da Braccio, Italian, by Joan Maria of Brescia, who 

worked at Venice and made this unique specimen about 1540. 
In its original state. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1062. Viola, Italian, by Peregrino Zanetto of Brescia, date about 

1550. 

One of the earliest known makers of the Brescian school. 
This specimen presents considerable interest as being- one 
of the earliest known instruments of the violin family as 
distinct from the old viols. Lent by Col. T. Myles Sandys, 

1063. Viol, Italian, by Gasparo da Salo, date about is6=;. Lent bv 

Mr. F. Pingrie. 

1064. Viola, Italian, by Gasparo da Salo, date about 1570. Lent by 

Mr. E. A. Sandeman. 

1065. Viola da (Jamba, Italian, by Gisparo de Salo, date about 

1570. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1066. Viola, Italian, by Gasparo da Salo, date about 1580 In its 

original state with the short neck and fingerboard. Lent by 
W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1067. Violin, Italian, by Gasparo da Salo, date about 1590. Lent 

by Lord Amherst of Hackney. 

1068. Violin, Italian, by Giovanni Paolo Maggini, of Brescia, date 

about 1620. 

One of two Violins by this maker that formerly belonged 
to De Beriot, the celebrated player. Lent by Mr. H. 
Sternberg. 

1069. Violin, Italian, by Andreas Amati in 1564. 

Originally one of the set of Amati instruments that 
belonged to Charles IX. of France. Lent by W. E. 
Hill & Sons. 

1070. Viola, Italian, made by Andreas Amati of Cremona about 

1570. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1071. Violoncello, Italian, by Andreas Amati of Cremona in 1572. 

Presented by Pope Pius V. to Charles IX. of France, 
called " The King." The instrument referred to by Forster 
and Sandys in their " History of the Violin" (page 203). 
Lent by Mr. John H. Bridges. 

101 



1072. Viola, Italian, by Antonius and Hieronymus Amati of Cremona 

in 1592, in its original large and uncut state. Lent by W. E. 
Hill & Sons. 

1073. Viola da (Jamba, Italian, by Antonius and Hieronymus Amati 

in 1624. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1074. Violin, Italian, made by Antonius and Hieronymus Amati of 

Cremona in 1628. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

1075. Viola, Italian, by Antonius and Hieronymus Amati of 

Cremona, date about 1630. Painting on back, of St. John 
the Baptist. Lent by H.M. The King. 

1076. Violin, Italian, by Nicola Amati of Cremona in 1646. Lent by 

Col. T. B. Shaw-Hellier. 

1077. Violin, Italian, made by Antonio Mariani of Pesaro, 1666. 

Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1078. Violin, Italian, by Nicolo Amati of Cremona in 1679. 

Formerly the property of the old glee-writer Stevens, 
who has scratched his name on the back and dated it 
"Charterhouse, 1796." Lent by Rev. E. H. Fellowes. 

1079. Violin, Italian, by Hieronymus Amati filius Nicolausin 1709. 

Lent by the Earl of Wemyss. 

1080. Violin, Italian, by Antonio Stradivari of Cremona. 

Of the early period of his work, with a painting of a 
lioness on the back. Lent by the Hon. Robert O'Neill, 
M.P. 

1081. Violin, Italian, made by Antonio Stradivari in 1679, remark- 

able not only for its ornamentation but for its large proportions. 
Known as the " Hellier," having been purchased by 
Sir Samuel Hellier of Womborne, Staffordshire, from the 
maker himself. "We may here incidentally remark that 
this Violin shows that Stradivari enjoyed rich patronage 
previous to 1680, for he received no ordinary remuneration 
for the making of such an instrument " {see " Life and Work 
of Antonio Stradivari "). Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

1082. Violin, Italian, by Antonio Stradivari of Cremona in 1685. 

Of small size. Lent by Mrs. Chapman. 

1083. Violin, Italian, by Antonio Stradivari of Cremona in 1720. 

Of small size. Lent by Mrs. Chapman. 

1084. Violin, Italian, by Antonio Stradivari of Cremona in 1735.' 

On the label the great maker has written that he made this 
violin in his ninety-second year. With its original case. Lent, 
by Mrs. Sassoon. 

1085. Violin Case, Italian, by Antonio Stradivari of Cremona ; 17th 

century. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. ' 

1086. Violin, Italian, by Joseph Guarnerius del Gesu, of Cremona, 

in 1738. Known as the Wieniawski, having belonged to the! 
celebrated player of that name. Lent by Sir Robert Borwick, 

102 



1087. Pochette, by Railihe, Padua, 1690. Lent by Mr. T. W. 

Taphouse, 

1088. Viol, large tenor, six strings; Italian, 17th century. Lent 

by Rev. J. W. Galpin. 

1089. Violin, English, dated 1578. — Boxwood, carved with woodland 

scenes. This Violin is said to have been given by Queen 
Elizabeth to the Earl of Leicester, and the arms of both these 
personages are engraved in silver on the finger-board. It 
has been suggested that it is the work of J. Pemberton, a 
maker of some celebrity in London about the year 1580; but 
there seems to be no other indication in support of this 
opinion than the initials "J. P.," which are engraved on the 
instrument. On the othtr hand, we have the opinion of an 
authority that the wood carving is some centuries older than 
the upper portion of the instrument, and that it dates from 
about 1330. This Violin may therefore be a reconstruction 
of an older instrument of the Violin kind. Lent by the Earl 
and Countess of Warwick. 

1090. Viol, English, dated 1609; the maker's name undecipher- 

able. Lent by the Earl of Wemyss. 

1091. Viola da Gamba, English, by Henry Key, of Southwarke, 

London, in 161 1. Lent by Mr. E. J. Payne. 

1092. Viola da Gamba, English by Henrie Jay, of Southwarke, 

London, in 1619. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1093. Violin, English, by Christopher Wise, in Wine Court, 

Bishopsgate Without, London, in 1650. Lent by W. E. 
Hill & Sons. 

1094. Violin, English, by Jacob Ravman, at "ye Belle yarde in 

Southwarke," London, in 1657. Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1095. Violin, English, by Thomas Urquhart, of London, in the year 

of the great fire, 1666. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1096. Viola da Gamba. — Formerly the property of Handel. Lent 

by Mr. H. Duckworth. 

1097. Viol, Treble, six strings, English. 1632. Lent by F. W. 
. Galpin. 

1098. Viola da Gamba, English, by John Pitts, of London, dated 

1679. Lent by W. E. H.ll & Sons. 

1099. Violin, English, by Edward Pamphilon, of London, date about 

1680. Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1100. Viola, English, by William Baker, of Oxford, 1683. Lent by 

Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

f 1101. Violin, English, by William Baker, of Oxford, 1683. Lent by 
Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

ill02. Violin, English, by Robert Cuthbert, 1690. Lent by Mr. J. T. 
Chapman. 

103 



1103. Viola da Gamba, English, by Barak Norman, of London, 

dated 1698. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1104. Sourdine Pochette, English, 1700. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

1105. Violin, English, made by Daniel Parker of London in 1709. 

Lent by W. E Hill & Sons. 

1106. Violin, English, by Barak Norman of St. Paul's Churchyard, 

London, dated 1719. Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1107. Violin, English, by Nathaniel Cross, of London, dated 1731. 

Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1108. Violin, English, by Joseph Scott, of Hallcliffe, Cumberland. 

Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1109. Violin, English, by Peter Wamsley, " at the Harp and 

Hautboy, in Pickadilly," London, dated 1742. Lent by 
Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1110. Viol, English, by Peter Wamsley, " at the Harp and Hautboy 

in Pickadilly," dated 1753. Lent by Mr. A. Chancellor. 

1111. Violin, English, by John Marshal, of London, dated 1754. 

Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1112. Viol, English (fitted up to be played as a tenor), by Edward 

Dickinson, London, 1759. Lent by Mr. A. J. Slocombe. 

1113. Violin, English, by Pearson Gardner, of London, dated 1760. 

Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1114. Violoncello, English, by Joseph Hill & Sons, of London, 

dated 1787, presented by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales 
(afterwards George IV.) to Mr. Wilson Braddyll, Groom 
of the Bedchamber. Lent by Miss M. Braddyll. 

1115. Violin, English, by Thomas Powell. Lent by Mr. J. T, 

Chapman. 

1116. Violin, English, by John Morris, of London, dated 1819. 

Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman. 

1117. Violin, by George Romney, the famous painter, with interesting 

carving on the back and a curiously shaped head. 

" Of his (Romney's) skill and ingenuity in carving the 

Violin which he made for himself, and which is now in my 

possession, is a curious specimen and a sufficient proof 

' (" Memoirs of George Romney," by the Rev. John Romney). 

Lent by Mrs. C. Prodgers. 

London, 1830. 

1118. Violin, English, by William Forsler. 

1119. Violin, English.— John and Henry Banks, Salisbury, in 1803. 

Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1120. Violin, English, by Thomas Dodd. Lent by Mr. J. T, 

Chapman. 

U34 



,1121. Violin, English, by J. F. Lott. Lent by Mr. J. T. Chapman, 

1122. Violin, English, by Charles' Harris, of Oxford, dated 1820. 

Lent by Mr. J. W. Taphouse. 

1123. Violin, English, of the size and model of an English Dancing 

Master's Kit, made by W. E. Hill in 1862 for the use of the 
late Duke of Edinburgh. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1124. Violin, English, made by Simon Bernard Fendt, of London, 

about 1820. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1125. Viola-da-G-amba, German, by Duiffoprugcar, 16th century. 

Lent by Mr. George Donaldson. 

1126. Pochette, German. 1670. 

1127. Pochette, German, by Joachim Tielke. Hamburg, 1671. 

1128. Pochette, German, Ebony and Ivory. Lent by Mr. Howard 

Head. 1672. 

1129. Viola da G-amba, German, by Jacobus Stainer, of Absam. 

Lent by Mr. W. E. Currey. 1667. 

1130. Pochette, by George Wurff. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

1700. 

1131. Viol of many bouts, 14 wire and seven sympathetic strings, 

by Antonius Zacher, Eistadt, 1716 (from the Nuremberg 
Castle collection). Lent by Mr. C. van Raalte. 

1132. Viola d'Amore, German, with sympathetic strings, circa, 1720. 

Lent by Mr. C. J. Wilson. 

1133. Violoncello, Dutch, by Pieter Rombouts of Amsterdam, in 

1720. Lent by Mr. E. A. Sandeman. 

1134. Viola d'Amore, German, by Paulus Aletse, of Munich, dated 

1724. Lent by Mr. L. van Walfelghem. 

1135. Viol, German, by Matthias Griesser, of Innsbruck, in 1727, of 

similar description to the other specimen of this maker's work 
shown in the collection, but with only 17 strings, ten being 
sympathetic. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1136. Viol, German, by Mathias Griesser, of Innsbruck, in 1727, of 

curious form, outline, and quaintly carved head. Strung with 
19 strings, twelve being sympathetic. Lent by W. E, 
Hill & Sons. 

1137. Viola d'Amore, German, by J. W. Eberle of Prague, dated 

1730 (formerly Carli Zoellers). Lent by Mr. Howard Head. 

1138. Tenor-Viol, German, seven strings, carved head and tail 

piece, by Johannes Hasert, Eiserach, 1753. Lent by Mr. 
C. van Raalte. 

1139. Violetta d'Amore, five melody, seven symphony . strings. 

Lent bv Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

105 

r a 



1140. Alto, German, five strings, 175c. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1141. Crwth, Welsh. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1142. Rebec. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1143. Welldish Fithele, three strings. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin/ 

1144. Rebec, Italian. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1145. Tromba Marina, 1700. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1146. Barytone d'Amore, six melody thirteen symphony strings. 

Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1147. Viola da (Jamba, French, seven strings, 1 708. Lent by Rev. 

F. W. Galpin. 

1148. Viola d'Amore, six melody and seven symphony strings. Lent 

by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1149. Viol, French, by Cuvrard, five strings. Lent by Mr. T. W. 

Taphouse. 

1150. Viol, four strings. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

1151. Violin, with a curiously carved back. Lent by Captain 

Alex. S. Beaumont. 

1152. Violin, Old. — With carved head, wreathed laurel, flat back, 

antique shaped sound holes. Lent by Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1153. Pochette, French, by A. Medard, Nancy, 1666. 

1154. Pochette, French, with case and bow, c. 1675. Lent by Mr. 

Howard Head. 

1155. Soudine, Nyckel-harpa, 1753. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. " 



Bows. 

1156. Violin Bow, Italian, by Antonio Stradivari, of Cremona. 

Originally with the Stradivari Violins belonging to 
King Charles IV. of Spain. The royal arms are inlaid 
on the nut. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1157. Violin Bow, French, by Francois Tourte. Octagon stick 
. original. Mountings of gold, tortoiseshell, &c. Lent by Mr. 

Alfred E. Hill. 

1158. Violoncello Bow, French, by Francois Tourte. Octagon 

stick original. Mountings of gold/ tortoiseshell, &c. Lent 
by Mr. Alfred E. Hill. ' 

1159. Violoncello Bow, English, by Dodd, of London, in its original 

state. Lent by Mr. Alfred E. Hill. . 

106 



1160. Violin Bow, English, by Dodd, of London, in its original 

state. Lent by Mr. Alfred E. Hill. 

1161. Violin Bow, English, by Panormo, of London, in its original 

state. Lent by Mr. Alfred E. Hall. 

1162. Violin Bow, of steel, faceted and lightly engraved near the 

end, towards which stands a lion passant holding a sceptre 
carved in full relief. The bow ends in a closed royal crown, 
Signed "Josef Ximenez." Spanish, i8th century. Exhi- 
bited at the Burlington Fine Arts Club, 1900. 

1163. Double Bass Bow, French, made by Lupot, of Paris. Date 

about 1800. Used by Bottesini, the famous player. Lent by 
the Oxford and Cambridge Musical Club. 

1164. Collection of old Bows of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. 

Many sticks are beautifully fluted, and exhibit considerable 
taste in design and symmetry in construction. Lent by W. E. 
Hill & Sons. 

1165. A Violin Maker's Plane, made of iron, beautifully ornamented 

and engraved round the sides with diamond-shaped musical 
notes and the words of an old French love-song. Stamped at 
the end is the name of Jacques Boquay, Rue d'Argentieul, 
Paris, and the date of 1715. Bocquay was one of the best 
violin makers of the period. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 



107 



Harps, Lutes, Guitars, Zithers, 
Dulcimers, &c. 



PREFACE. 

THE older members of the class of instrument 
included in this section have an origin that is 
lost in antiquity : from the days when the 
hunter, drawing across his bow a tightly-stretched 
string, produced (undoubtedly at first by accident) a 
musical sound, there has existed the embryo harp ; 
before the era of any historical details that have been 
handed down to us, these first rough instruments were 
in use. To one stretched string it was an easy task 
to add others, and in pictures of early harps we find 
the form of the hunter's bow retained, the strings 
attached thereto increasing in number as time went 
on. So long as it remained without a front pillar, 
little tension could be borne by the feeble frame, and 
consequently little sound obtained ; but the addition 
of this bar, and of the resonating chamber (or sound 
board) on the other side of the strings was a great 
step in the development of the instrument. A 
complete diatonic scale was an early possession, but 
the formation of chromatic notes by any other means 
than the rough-and-ready one of shortening the 
strings by the placing of the fingers on them was not 
put into practice until 1811, when the inventive genius 
of Erard gave first a single-action, and afterwards a 
double-action pedal, which affected the notes by a 
semitone and a tone respectively, this being the 
carrying out of an idea which had been conceived but 
never practically realised by a French maker named 
Cosineau. This harp, with sound board, pillar, and 
double-action pedal, fitted for the performance of all 
modern music with its chromatic effects, is the harp of 
to-day; an interesting variant is the "Welsh Triple 
Harp,'' elaborate and complete in its mechanism, 

109 



which substitutes an additional row of strings instead 
of using the pedals for the chromatic notes, adding 
greatly to the difficulty of performance. In appearance 
the harp must be esteemed as the most graceful and 
beautiful of all musical instruments. 

Beautiful, too, as works of art, with their inlaid 
ivory, are the lutes of our forefathers : like their 
modern descendant, the guitar and the bowed viols, 
and unlike the harp, many notes could be played on 
one string, although plucking rather than bowing was 
the method of production of the sound ; but in this 
instrument the resonating body was from the first 
present. From the tombstones of Egyptian monu- 
ments we may form ideas as to the shape of the 
earliest lutes, the frets (marking the position on the 
finger board to be taken to produce other notes than 
the open string) being even then in evidence ; the 
Greeks possessed it in the modified form of the cithara 
(allied to the lyre), but the lute proper, and the guitar, 
may be traced to Spain, and thence back to the 
Moors, and so to the times of the Egyptian dynasties. 
Elaborately strung and difficult to play, it yet became 
an instrument of universal popularity in Europe, and 
it was made in infinite variety, with many sizes, and 
varying numbers of strings, from the small cithern to 
the great arch-lute. Thus music in parts was possible, 
and in Elizabethan times there were consorts of lutes, 
the ingenuity of the minstrels of the day having much 
influence in the development of music ; played both as 
solo and as accompanying instruments, the lute had a 
repertoire of its own written in tablature (not the 
ordinary musical notation, but a staff with indications 
for the position of the fingers in the frets required to 
produce the notes) ; its modern descendant, the man- 
doline, is greatly inferior to it in beauty of tone, and 
is moreover played by a plectrum. 

The guitar, allied to the lute, but with the 
difference of having a flat, and not a curved back, 
has six strings, and is a more modern instrument; 
it has two forms, the Spanish and the English, the 
latter having a different shaped body, and having 
gradually given way to the older model. Both had 
frets, and have a twentieth century descendant in the 

110 



banjo, for which instrument, however, beauty of tone 
has given place to loud twanging sounds. 

Well known to all that visit Tyrol is the zither, 
an instrument of great antiquity, supposed by some 
to have been the same as the " Psalter " of the Bible, 
and allied to the Psaltery so often seen in early 
Italian religious pictures. Like others of this class, 
The zither has a melodic finger board with frets and 
free accompanying strings for using in chords ; the 
melody is made and played by the fingers ; it has a 
large and varying number of strings, and is capable 
of effect, of great charm, especially in the Bavarian 
Landler and peasant songs. 

The ancient . dulcimer is interesting as being 
the earliest predecessor of our household instrument, 
the pianoforte, it being allied to this in the fact that 
the strings are set in vibration by hammers (though 
in the dulcimer this consists of only one pair, held 
and wielded directly by the player), and also in the 
ability to produce sounds both loud and soft. 
Ancient pictures of the dulcimer gives us some idea 
of its age; its form has always remained much the 
same as we meet with it now in Hungarian bands, 
viz., a four-sided box strung with several strings 
to each note, with two bridges, and ornamental 
sound holes. It is laid flat on a table, and its 
performance by a skilful player is fascinating not 
merely to the ear, but the eye. The contrast of 
tone is produced by the fact that the hammers are 
clothed on their two sides with hard and with soft 
leather; in Hungary it is called the cembalo, but 
in some form or other it has been found in almost 
every country. 

E. MARKHAM LEE. 



Stringed Instruments. 

Plucked String. 

1166. Harp, Scotch, known as the Clarsach Lumanach, or Lamont 

Harp. Supposed to have been brought from Argyleshire by 
Lilias Lamont on her marriage with Robertson of Lude, 
1464. Lent by Mr. W. Moir Bryce. 

1167. Harp, Welsh Triple. Lent by Mr. J. G. Morley. 

1168. Harp, Welsh, small, antique, portable. Lent by Mr. J. G. 

Morley. 

1169. Harp, Irish, 1734. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1170. Harp, Irish, 1750. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1171. Harp, Irish, by Egan, small, portable, Lent by Mr. J. G. 

Morley. 

1172. Bell Harp. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott 

1173. Harp Lute by Angelo Ventura (1800-15). Lent by Dr. E. F. 

Horner. 

1174. Spitz-Harp or Double Psaltery. Lent by Rev. J. W. Galpin. 

1175. Rote, early German. Lent by Rev. J. W. Galpin. 

1176. Scheithult, 18th century. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1177. Chitarrone, Italian, 18th century. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

1178. Cetera, inlaid. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

1179. Cittern, Italian, 1650. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1180. Cittern, German. — Made about 1700. Lent by Mr. Arthur 

F. Hill. 

1181. Cittern, English. — Made by Benjamin Banks, of Salisbury, in. 

1757. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1182. Cittern, English. — Made by Remerius Liessem, of London, in 

17 — . Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1183. Cittern, English.— Made by Thomas Haxby, of York, for" 

H.M. George III. In its original leather case with the 
Royal crown and initials G. R. stamped upon it.. Lent by 
Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1184. Cittern. — Made by James Perry, Dublin, circa 1780. Lent 

by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 1 • " 

1185. Cittern, Keyed, English, 1800. Lent by Rev. F. W/Galpiflti' :! 

113 



1186. Cittern, English. Formerly the property of the Wesley 

family. Lent by Mrs. Dean. 

1187. Cittern, double strings (German), 1708. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

1188. Guitar, Italian, by Antonio Stradivari of Cremona in 1680. 

This guitar is inscribed on the back of the peg box " Anto. 
Stradivarius Cremonen 3 F 1680." It was brought from 
Brescia in 1881, and was acquired by Messrs! W. E. Hill & 
Sons, of London. Lent by W. E. Hill & Sons. 

The beautiful arabesque ro^e of this guitar will attract 
attention. The coat-of-arms uDOn the fingerboard indicates 
the noble family to which the instrument formerly belonged. 

1189. Lyre-Guitar, French, 1808. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1190. Guitar, Spanish quarter, by Antonio Garbito, 1815. Lent by 

Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1191. Guitar, old French. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1192. Guitar, inlaid, wire strings, with capo d'astra bar. Lent by 

Miss E. A. Willmott. 

1193. Guitar, inlaid, Spanish. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

1194. Lyre-Guitar, by Wornum. Lent by Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1195. Zither, modern. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

196. 3Jj'uga, English, 18th century. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1197. Pandore, Italian, 17th century. Lent by Rev. F. W. 

Galpin. 

1198. Pandurina, or Treble Lute, 16 slrirgs, by Christian Noamacher 

Gongua, 1737. Lent by Mr. T. W. laphouse. 

1199. Pandurina, 1756. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1200. Theorbo Lute, 16 19. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1201. Lute, by Joann Kurz, .1787. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

1202. Lute, Italian, 12 strings. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

1203. Lute, Italian, ivory and ebony inlaid fingerboard, 15th 

century. Lent by Mr. J. A. Fuller Maitland. 

1204. Lute, pear shaped. Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

1205. Mandoline, Milanese, by M. A. Bergonzi, 1755. Lent by 

C. Van Raalte. 

1206. Mandoline, 1797. Lent by Rev. T. W. Galpin. 

1207. Theorbo (large). Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 
12(18. Mandora, 1681. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

114 



1209. Buche, French, called also Epinette des Vosges, 16th 

century (ancestor of the modern Zither). Lent by C. van 
Raalte. 

1210. Epinette des Vosges. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

1211. Archlute, long-necked (inlaid). Lent by Miss E. A. Willmott. 

1212. Dulcimer, Italian. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. 

1213. Dulcimer, Old English, circa 1790. Lent by Mr. T. L. 

Southgate. 

1214. Psaltery, English, 1789. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1215. Psaltery. Lent by Mr. John Glen. 

1216. Psaltery. Lent by Lady Huggins. 

1217. Aeolian Harp, 12 strings. Lent by Rev. F. W. Galpin. 

1219. Vielle (en Guitare), or Hurdy-Gurdy. By Pierre Cesasare 
Pons, Maitre de Vielle a. Paris, 1776. Original label. 

The earliest historical Hurdy-Gurdy is the Organistron 
of the 9th century. From the 12th to the 15th centuries 
it was in much esteem. Later it became the instrument of 
the poor, and was known as L' Instrument des Pauvres, 
and as the Beggar's Lyre. In the 18th century the Vielle 
was again in favour in France, and a number of works « ere 
composed for it in combination with other instruments. The 
Vielle or Hurdy-Gurdy is operated by a rotating wheel 
instead of a bow. Lent by Lady Huggins. 



116 



Portraits, Paintings, Engravings, 
Drawings, etc. 

PREFACE. 

THE sister arts of Painting and Music go hand in 
hand — if not face to face — in this Exhibition. 
Artists have found excellent sitters in com- 
posers — Handel, to wit, who was a great lover of 
pictures. Attention may therefore be directed to the 
fine portrait of Handel, painted by Hudson, which the 
Earl Howe has kindly allowed to leave its home at 
Gopsall, Leicestershire, in order to be exhibited for the, 
first time. The portrait, life-size, represents Handel in 
his seventy-second year, three years before his death. 
His full Court, dress, the handsome gold embroidery 
onthe coat' and the lace frills, no less than the gold- 
headed, cane and gilt-tipped sword in its leather- 
covered scabbard, go to make up a dignified present- 
ment of a great master-musician. Another Hudson 
portrait of the composer of "The Messiah," from the 
collection of the Royal Society of Musicians, of which 
Handel was a member — a portrait by Kyte (lent by 
Dr. W. H. Cummings) — an excellent likeness accord- 
ing to Hawkins ; and one by Denner (from Mr. Alfred 
Littleton's collection) — constitute altogether a splendid 
quartet of Handel portraits. 

" A worthy contemporary of Handel was Dr. Arne, 
whose countenance is well portrayed by the brush of 
Zoffany ; ' and, there; is also another portrait of' the 
composer of " Rule, . -Britannia." Dr. John Blow, the, 
composer of "I beheld, and lo!" sat to Sir Peter' 
Lely, the chief painter of Charles II., and the result, 
of whose art- work is -before us in the portrait lent 
by the authorities of St, Michael's College, Tenbury,, 
Two delineations of Dr. Greene are here to be seen — 
one by an unknown artist, the other, painted by, 

117 



Francis Hayman (1708-1776), and lent by Mr. J. 
Edward Street, shows Dr. Greene in the company of 
his friend, John Hoadly, the poet and dramatist. 

Four portraits came from the Music School 
Collection, Oxford —the brothers Lawes (William and 
Henry), Nicolas Laniere, and Christopher Simpson. 
Haydn and I. P. Salomon are two names closely 
associated with one another in regard to the- visits 
of the composer of the " Creation " to England. 
They both sat to Thomas Hardy, R.A., a painter of 
repute at the end of the 18th century, with what 
success the visitor who looks at the two portraits may 
judge. The names of Callcott and Horsley bear 
family as well as artistic relation to each other. 
Here is a portrait of Dr. Callcott, painted by his 
brother, Sir Augustus Callcott, and one of I. B. 
Cramer, the pianist, painted by the late John C. 
Horsley, R.A. The celebrated portrait painter, 
George Romney — who, by the way, played the violin 
— is represented in the Exhibition by a picture of 
Dr. Crotch, lent by the Royal Academy of Music. 

Players on stringed instruments will take a special 
interest in the portraits of Corelli, Geminani, Viotti, 
Paganini, Kreutzer, Robert Lindley, Dragonetti, 
Ernst, Charles Ashley (the Violoncellist and a Past- 
Master of the Musicians' Company), Mori, Sivori, and 
Alfredo Piatti (by Holl). 

Church Musicians will look with sympathetic 
interest upon the faces of S. S. Wesley and John 
Stainer (by Hermoker) ; while pianists will have the 
opportunity of beholding the features of Clementi, 
John Field, Mendelssohn (two portraits), Chopin, 
and Sterndale Bennett (by Millais). 

There are two portraits, of Opera singers in 
character— Jenny Lind as " Norma," and Charles 
Incledon as he appeared in the prison scene of " The 
Beggar's Opera." Weber and his host, Sir George 
Smart, are also here, and so is a portrait of a very 
ancient composer — Monteverde. Various pictures — 
non-portraits — lend variety to the canvases and 
engravings here gathered together, and, in conclusion, 

118 



we must not forget to mention the Purcell portraits, 
which include that painted by Closterman in 1693 or 
1694, and that attributed to Sir Godfrey Kneller. 

In looking at these various portraits of men and 
women of music, one is reminded of the truth of 
Carlyle's words : — 

" Any representation made by a faithful 
" human creature of that face and figure 
" which he saw with his eyes, and which I 
" can never see with mine, is now valuable 
" to me, and much better than none at all." 

F. G. EDWARDS. 



119 



Oil Paintings and Portraits. 

1220. Ame, T. A., by Zoffany. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

1221. Ame, Dr. — Portrait in oils. Lent by Mr. John Jackson. 

1222. Ame, Dr., with flute. — Oil painting. Lent by Mr. Joseph 

Edward Street. 

1223. Ashley, Charles. — Violoncellist and past-master of the 

Musicians Company. (John Cawse.) Lent by Mr. Arthur 
F.Hill. 

1224. Bach. — Ten portraits of or relating to the Bach family. Lent 

by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

1225. Each. — Portrait of a musician and three sons. (believed to be 

the Bach family). Lent by Mr. A. Kummer. 

1226. Bennett, W. Sterndale., by Millais. Lent by Professor 

Case. 

1227. Bennett, Sir William Sterndale.— Portrait by Sir John 

Millais, 1873. Lent by Mr. Thomas Case. 

1228. Blow, Dr. John, by Lely. Lent by St. Michael's College, 

Tenbury. 

1229. Bull, Dr. John. Lent by Mr. T. W. Taphouse. , 

1230. Callcott, Dr. (Callcott). Lent by Messrs. Broadwood & Sons 

1231. Carestini, Joannes. — A famous singer in Handel's service, 

1734. Lent by Mr. Arthur Hill. 

1232. Cervetto, J. . Lent by Messrs. W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1233. Clementi, Mnezio. Lent by Messrs. Collard & Collard. 

1234. Correllius (Arcangelus) de Fusignano, dictus Bononiensis. 

H. Howard, pinx. J. Smith, fecit. Lent by Mr. Arthur 
Hill. 

1235. Correlli, A. Lent by the Royal Society of Musicians. 

1236. Conperin, F. Organist de la Chapelle du Roy, 1735. Lent , 

by Mr. Arthur Hill. 

1237. Cramer, J. B. (Horsley). Lent by Messrs. Broadwood & Sons. 

1238. Crotch, W., by Beechey. Lent by the Royal Academy of 

Music. 

1239. Cusins, the late Sir William. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

<•■-.' :A . 

1240. Dragonetti, Domenico. Lent by Messrs. J. and Y. Hppkinson. 

121 



1241. Ernst, H. W. (Tatham, R.A.) Lent by Mr. Alfred Gibson. 

1242. Field, John. Lent by Messrs. Collard & Collard. 

1243. Germiniani. Lent by the Royal Society of Musicians. 

1244. Grancey, Madame la Marquise de — A Player of the Viol. 

Lent by Mr. Alfred Hill. 

1245. Greene, Dr. Maurice. Lent by Mr. Morton H. Festing. 

1246. Greene, Dr. Maurice. Lent by Mr. J. E. Street. 

1247. Hague, Dr., of Cambridge. Lent by Mr. Arthur Hill. 

1248. Haydn, Joseph, Mu=. Doc. — Painted and engraved by T. 

Hardy. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1249. Handel. Three portraits. Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

1250. Handel, by Damer. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

1251. Handel. Lent by the Royal Society of Musicians. 

1252. Handel, by Hudson. Lent by Earl Howe, G.C.B. 

1253. Handel, by Kyte, 1742. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1254. Handel. — Oil painting of Gentleman playing Bass Viol. 

Supposed to be p. portrait of Mr. Handel. Lent by Mr. 
Shaw Hellier. 

1255. Haydn, J. (Hardv), painted during his visit to Londcn. •Lent 

by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1256. Hoadley, Dr., 1747. Lent by Mr. J E. Street. 

1257. Incledon, Charles, in Prison Scene of " The Beggar's Opera." 

Painted by John Opil. Lent by Mr. W. Gilbert. 

1258. Kreutzer, E. Lent by Mr. George Hart. 

1259. Laniere, N. Lent by the Music Schools of Oxford. 

1260. Lawes, ■William. Lent by the Music Schools of Oxford. 

1261. Lawes, Henry. Lent by the Music Schools of Oxford. 

1262. Lind, Jenny. — In the character of "Norma," by Count 

d'Orsay, j 847. Lent by Mr. Otto Goldschmidt. 

1263. Lindley, Robert. Lent by J. and Y. Hopkinson. 

1264. Mac'arren, George, by Mrs. Goodman. Lent by Mr. Walter 

Macfarren. 

1265. Mendelssohn, J. P. L., by Magnus. Lent by Mr. Walter 

Macfairen. 

1266. Mori, N. Lent by Messrs. W. E. Hill & Sons. 

1267. Monteverdi, Claudio (1 568-1 643). Lent by Mr. Arthur 

F. Hill. 

122 



1268. Paganini, N., by George Patten, A.R.A. With autograph 

letter by Paganini attached. Lent by Mr. A. F. Patten. 

1269. Piatti, Alfred, by Holl. Lent by Mr. F. C. Pawle. 

1270. Pugnani, G. Lent by Mr. George Hart. 

1271. Purcell, H., by Kneller. Lent by Mr. Alfred Littleton. 

1272. Purcell, H., painted by Klostermans. Lent by the Royal 

Society of Musicians. 

1273. Purcell, H., attributed to Kneller. Lent by Mrs. Sinclair and 

the Misses Dove. 

1274. Purcell, Henry. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1275. Sainton, Prosper. Lent by Mr. P. Sainton. 

1276. Salamon, J. P. (Hardy). Companion to the portrait of Haydn. 

Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1277. Simpson, C. Lent by the Music Schools of Oxford. 

1278. Sivori, C. Lent by Mr. George Hart. 

1279. Smart, Sir George. Lent by the Foundling Hospital. 

1280. Spagnoletti, Paolo, by Child. Lent by Mr. C. E. Spagnoletti. 

1281. Stainer, the late Sir John. Lent by Lady Stainer. 

1282. Stewart, the late Sir Robert P.— Oil painting. Lent by 

the Royal Irish Academy of Music. 

1283. Viotti, J. B. Lent by Mr. George Hart. 

1284. Weber, C. M. von. Lent by the Foundling Hospital. 

1285. Wesley, S. S— Portrait in pastel. Lent by Mrs. Marshall. 

1286. Wiener, W— Violinist. Portrait by J. B. Burgess, A.A. 

Lent by Mrs. W. Weiner. 

Engravings, Drawings, etc. 

1287. Abel, C. P. — 3. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1288. Abel, C. F. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1289. Age and Music. — Lady playing Violoncello. Published by 

iiowles and Carver. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1290. " L'aimable accord.'' — Flute, Violin and Archlute players. 

Print by De Troy. Lent by Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1291. Aldrich, H. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1292. Albrechtsberger, J. G. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1293. Alcock, John. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

123 



1294. Amateurs in Music Sounding their A.— Fores, 1794. Lent 

by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1295. Ambrogetti. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1296. Anglebert, J. H. d'. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1297. Arne, Dr. — As a Musical Doctor. Caricature by Rowlandson. 

Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

1298. Arne. — Pencil Drawing. Lent by Mr. Bumham W. Horner. 

1299. Arnold, S. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1300. Arnold, Dr. Lent by Mr. Bumham W. Horner. 

1301. Ars Musica. Lent by Mr. Arthur J. Hill. 

1302. Bannister, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1303. Bartleman, James. — 2. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1304. Bartleman. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1305. Bates, Mrs. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1306. Bates, Joah.— Date 1794. Lent by Mr. Burnham W. Horner. 

1307. Bates, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1308. Beard, B. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1309. Beckwith, J. C. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1310. Beethoven, from the original Lyser drawings. Lent by 

Lady Cusins. 

1311. Beethoven, L. V. — Musical Note Book, with Memorandum 

as to need of lamp oil, where to get it, price, &c. Lent by 
Mr. Watson Smith. 

1312. Beethoven. — His Mask. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

1313. Beethoven.— Watch. Lent by Mr. Wafson Smith. 

1314. Beethoven. — His Last Piano. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

1315. Beethoven. — Lock of hair. Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

1316. Beethoven. — His Musical Note Book. Lent by Mr. Watson 

Smith. 

1317. Benda, Francois. — Engraved by G. M. Schuster, 1756. Lent 

by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1318. Berlioz.— Oetzmacher sc. Lent by Mr. W. T. Freemantle. 

1319. Berlioz, H — Caricature by Dantan. Lent by Mr. W. T. 

Freemantle. 

1320. Bettini, Trebelli— Photo with signature, 1868. Lent by 

Lady Cusins. 

1321. Bianchi, P. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

124 



1322. Billington, Mrs. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1323. Billington, Mrs.— Caricature. Lent by Mr. Burnham W. 

Horner. 

1324. Billington, Mrs.— Caricature in Artaxerxes. Lent by Mr. 

Burnham W. Horner. 

1325. Bononcini. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1326. Borghi, L. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1327. Boyce, Dr. William, 1755 (Master of the King's Musick).— • 

Portrait. Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

1328. Boyce, William. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1329. Boy with Fiddle.— J. G. Haid del. et fecit. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hill. 

1330. Braham, John (with autograph). Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson 

1331. Braham, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1332. Brahms in his Study. Lent by Mr. Alfred Gibson. 

1333. Britton, T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1334. Burney, C. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1335. Calcott, J. W. Lent by Mr. T. C. Johnson. 

1336. Campra, Andre (Maitre de musique de la Chapelle du Roi). 

Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1337. Carolan. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1338. Catalani, A. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1339. Cecil, R. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1340. St. Cecilia, attended by the Magdalen, St. Paul, St. John, St. 

Augustin, etc. From the painting of Raphael in the Church 
of St. Giovanni in Monte, at Bologna. Lent by Mr. Arthur 
F. Hill. 

1341. Cervetto, Giacomo Bassevi. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1342. " Le Charme de la Musique. " — Print by De la Hyre. Lent 

by Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1343. Cheap Music— Geo. Lisle, 1830. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1344. Chopin. — Drawing by Winterhalter, signed "F. Winterhalter, 

2 Mai, 1847." With inscription " k Mademoiselle Josephine 
de Castelvecchio." Purchased from her daughter Elsina P. 
de Castelvecchio in 1898, by H. D. W. Lent by Mr. H. 
Davan Welton. 

1345. Cianchettini. — Master Pie (engraving in colours, drawn and 

engraved by P. Condie). Lent by Mr. J. Bowman. 

1346. Claggett, C. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

12S 



1347. Cleramhault, N. (Organise du Roy). Lent by Mr. Arthur ■ 

F. Hill. ■; 

1348. Clive, Mrs. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1349. Coecilis alterno luditique, &c. (Lute and pipe, &c.) Lent • 

by Mrs. Cecil BosanquU. 

1350. Collins. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1351. Collection of 82 photographs of important Musicians of the 

19th century. Lent by Mr. A. F. Hill. 

1352. "Compagnia de Borgognoni che etudian musica" (Lute, 

cornetto, curvo, etc.). — Print by Caravaggio. Lent by Mrs. . 
Cecil Bosanquet. 

1353. "Miss Conyers of Capt. Hall" (seated in grotto playing 

cittern). — Print by Devis. Lent by Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1354. " Concert de Musique." — Print by Dominicani. Lent by Mrs. . 

Bosanquet. 

1355. Concerto Spirituale. — Bretherton fecit. Lent by Mr. Arthur 

F. Hill. 

1356. Cooke, B. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1357. Cooke, T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1358. Corhett, William. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1359. Courtup. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1360. Country Choristers. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1361. Cramer, Francois, 1834 (Master of the King's Musick). — 

Portrait. Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

1362. Cramer, F. & J. B, — Miniature and other drawings of, also 

engraving of J. B. Cramer. Lent by Mr. R. McCaskie. 

1363. Crescentini, Or. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1364. Crotch, W. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1365. Croft, Gulielmus, Mus. Doc. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1366. Crotch, William. — Engraved by James Fittler. 

This celebrated child who discovered extraordinary 
talents for music during the third year of his age, was born 
at Norwich, July 5th, 1775. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1367 Crotch, W. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1368. Dalayrac, N. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1369. Davy, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1370. Delatre after A. Eauffman, Miss Harrop. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hill. 

126 



1371. Dupuis, T. S. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1372. Duiffoprugear, Gaspar. Etched by Pierre Woerriot-di- 

Bpuzey. Lent by Mrs. Julian Marshall. 

1373. Dvorak.— Photo. Lent by Mr. A. Littleton. 

1374. Eberlinus, Daniel— Strauch fecit. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. 

Hill. 

1375. Etchings (4). Lent bv Mrs. Julian Marshall. 

1376. The Fair Musician. P. Mercier Pinx*- Wilson fecit, " If 

Musick be the Food of Love, play on." Lent by Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill. 

1377. FaTire, J. — Photo with signature. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

1379. Field, John. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1380. Fisher, J. C. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1381. Gambarini. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1382. Gates, B. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1383. Gerle, Hanns. — Lutenist in Nurnberg, 1532. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hill. 

1384. Gluck, C. W— Portrait. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1385. Griffiths, C. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 
1388. Grisi.— Photo. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

1387. Gottlieb, Baron Ernst. — Lutenist. Lent by Mrs. Cecil 

Bosanquet. 

1388. Gontero, JacODO. — Lute Player. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1389. Grann, K. H. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1390. Green, Dr. Maurice, 1735. — Portrait. Master of the King's 

Musick. Lent by J. S. Bumpus. 

1391. Robin O'Green. — Ballad Singer. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1392. Gretry, A. E. M. — Seven portraits, six drawings of his house, 

tomb, &c. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1393. Gretry, A. E. M. — Miniature. Lent by Mr. H- Sternberg. 

1394. Grisi.— Photo. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

i395. Haffner, Jean Ullric. — Maitre de Lut a Nurnberg. Stor Sc, 
1730. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1396. Handel. — Caricature* by Goupy : " The Charming Brute." 

Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1397. Handel.— Print. Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

1398. Handel.— Print. Lent by Col. Shaw-Hellier. 

127 



1399. Handel Commemoration in Westminster Abbey, probably 

January 5th, 1784. Lent by Mr. F. Y. Smith. 

1400. Handel (Houbraken). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1401. Handel. — Caricatures (2). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1402. Handel, rare, by Benoist. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1403. Handel. — Portrait on enamel. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1404. Handel (Faber). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1405. Haslero, Job. Leo.— Portrait. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1406. Hatton, J. L. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1407. Hatton, J. L— With autograph. Lent by Mr. Burnham W, 

Horner. 

1408. Hawes, Arne, Webb, Nare & J. S. Smith (in one frame). 

Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1409. Haydn, J. — Miniature by Klein. Lent by Mr. H. Sternberg. 

1410. Hayes, W. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1411. Heather, S. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1412. Herbst Johannes Andreas. — S. Furck. With music, 1635. 

Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

1413. Hitzenaner, Christoph. — Cantor at Laningen. Portrait, 

Platzburg, 1585. Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

1414. Hook, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1415. Hudson, George, 1660 (Masterof the King's Musick). — Portrait, 

Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

1416. Hummel, Jean, Hep. de Vienne.— Dessine d'apres la nature, 

par Mademoiselle Catherine Escherich. Lent by Mr. Arthur 
F. Hill. 

1417. Five Humorous Pictures of Musical amateurs, by 

Woodward. Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

1418. The Humorous Fiddler. — London printed for Spilsbury, 1767. 

Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1419. Hunt, Mrs. Arabella, d. 1705.— G. Smith after Kneller, 1706. 

Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1420. Hurlebosch, C. F., Organist and Composer at Amsterdam. 

Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

1421. Inglott, William, Organist, Norwich, 1621. His monument 

was restored by Dr. Crotch. Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

■1422. Jackson, W. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1423. A Lady singing and a Gentleman playing the Viol da 
Gamba. By Jan Ochtervelt. Lent by Mr. W. B. Paterson,, 

128 



1424. Lady with Viol da Gamba. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1425 Lady with Cit'ern — Miss Harriett Powell; Lent by Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill. 

1426. Lady with Cittern.— Miss Kettle. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. 

Hill. • , 

1427. Lalande. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. '■'■■'■■•' 

1428. Lampe, J. P. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1429. Langdon, T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1430. Lanier, Nicholas. Lent by Sir Frederick Bridget 

1431. The Laughing Boy with Piddle, after Frans Hals. Lent 

by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1432. Lassns, 0. de. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

: I, 

1433. Leveridge, J. (two in one frame). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1434. Leinkdorffer, Albrech Martin. Anno 1688. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hill. 

1435. Lind, Jenny, and Lablache in " Don Pasquale." — Crayon, 

by Blaikley. Lent by Mr. D. J. Blaikley. 

1436. Linley, T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1437. Logier, J. B. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1438. Low, R. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1439 "The Lnte Lesson" (print by Guercino and Bartolozzi). 
Lent by Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1440. The Lnte Player. — Mezzotint, by J. Faber the younger, after 

the original picture by Frans Hals. 

The Lute shown here is a fine specimen of the instrument 
at its highest development. Lent by Lady Huggins. 

1441. Man with Double Bass.— G. Lisle fecit. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hill. 

1442. Manchester Festival.— Print. Lent by Mr. C, T. Johnson. 

1443. Man with Lute, after Franz Hals. — Print. Lent by Lady 

Huggins. 

1444. Mara, Madame, as Armida— Engraved by Collyer after 

Jean. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1445. Marcello (2). Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1446. Marchand, Louis. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1447. Mario.— Photo. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

1449. Marais, Marin.— A celebrated Viol da Gamba p!aycr, 17C4. 
Lent by Mr. Alfred Hill. 

129 



1450. Mason, W. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1451. Malibran (2), with autograph letter. Lent by Mr. Burnham 

W. Horner. 

1452. Mendelssohn, Cecilia, wife of the composer. — Portrait. Lent 

by Arthur O'Leary. 

1453. Mendelssohn, Bartholdy F. (said to be one of two existing 

impressions). Lent by Mr. Arthur O'Leary. 

1454. Mendelssohn, Bartholdy P. Lent by Mr. W. T. Freemantle. 

1455. Mendelssohn, Bartholdy F — Portrait. Lent by Mr. Felix 

Moscheles. 

1456. Mendelssohn, Bartholdy F. — Engraved portrait of Mendels- 

sohn and his friend Schleinitz, presented by the latter to 
Miss Zimmermann. Lent by Miss Zimmermann. 

1457. Mendelssohn, Bartholdy F. — Water-colour sketch painted 

from life, by C. S. Herv£. Lent by Mr. Joseph Edward 
Street. 

1458. Mendelssohn, Bartholdy F. — Portrait. Lent by Mr. O ' Leary. 

1459. Meredith. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1460. Messing, F. T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1461. Miller, E. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1462. Monticelli. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1463. Morrell, T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1464. Mossier, Michael.— Anno 1686. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1465. Mouton, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1466. The Musician. — J. G. Haid after Amoroso. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hill. 

1467. The Musical Ladies. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1468. Nares, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1469. Nilsson, Christine. — Photo with signature. Lent by Lady 

Cusins. 

1470. Nilsson, Christine. — Photos with signature. Lent by Lady 

Cusins. 

1471. NorriS, T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1472. Morris, Thomas, Bac. Mus., late Organist of Christ Church 

and St. John's College, Oxford, 1701. John Taylor pinxt. 
et fecit. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1473. Ochsenkun, Sebastian. — Portrait No. 1. Lent by Mrs. Julian 

Marshall. 



130 



1474. Ochsenkun, Sebastian.— Portrait No. 2. Lent by Mrs. 1 

Julian Marshall. 

1475. Paesiello, Giovanni.— Portrait. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1476. Painting representing Gentleman playing Recorder. Lent 

by Mi»s E. A. Willmott. 

1477. Du Pare (sign. Lisabetta), della La Francesina.— George 

Knapton pinxt. J. Faber fecit, 1739. Lent by Mr. Arthur 
F. Hill. 

1478. Parry, John, Jun., "Doub'e fugue."— Original Drawing-; 

Lent by Mr. J. S. Shedlock. 

1479. Parsons, Sir William, 1786, Master of the King's Musick. 

— Portrait. Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

1480. Patti, Adelina.— Photo with signature, Jan. 9th, 1867. Lent 

by Lady Cusins. 

1481. Pepusch, Johannes Christophorus, Mus. Doc. Oxon. — 

Thomas Hudson, pinxt, A. van Haecken, fecit. Lent by 
Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1482. Philips. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1483. Playford, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1484. Porter, S. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1485. Portrait (on a panel) of Gentleman holding a Plnte, com- 

panion portrait of a Lady seated at a Spinet, by W. Hen- 
drike, 1781. Lent by Durlacher Bros. 

1486. Portrait on panel of a XVI. Century Musician, by a 

painter of the school of Moroni. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. 
Hill. 

1487. Portrait (unknown). — A painting of a Violinist. Lent by 

Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1488. Praeger, Emil. — Pen and ink drawing. Moscheles' journey 

from London to Leipzig, 1846. Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

1489. Price, Thomas. — Printed by W. Lawranson, engraved by 

John Jones. . Musician, and Master of the Farthing Pie 
House in Mary le bone. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1490. Prince Regent. — Caricature in colours. Playing the 'cello, 

with various celebrities introduced in political and musical 
skit. Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

1491. Purcell, Henry. — Painting of room in Purcell's residence in 

Bowling Alley, showing the fireplace, door, etc.. used in con- 
strucling the Purcell bookcase. Lent by Sir Frederick 
Bridge. 

1492. Pyne, Louisa, in " Satanella." — Crayon by Blaikley. Lent 

by Mr. D. J. Blaikley. 

13t 



1493. Rameau, I. P. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1494. Randall, Dr. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1495. Randall, R. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1496. Rauzzini, V. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1497. Ray, Martha. — Engraved by Valentine Green. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hill. 

1498. Reeves, Sims (litho.). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1499. Reeve, V. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1500. " Rehearsal for an Opera" (Ricci). Lent by Broadwood & 

Sons. 

1501. Robinson, Mrs. Anastatia. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1502. Robinson, J. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1503. Rogers, (autotype). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1504. Rolla, Allessandro. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1505. Rossini. — " Offert a. mon jeune Collegue Arthur S. Sullivan. 

G. Rossini, Paris, I2d, 1862." Lent by Mr. Watson Smith. 

1506. Rubinstein, A. — Photograph with signature and picture of him 

playing. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

1508. Russell, Henry.— By Blaikley. Lent by Mr. D. J. Blaikley. 

1509. Les Savoyards. — G. Cruikshank fecit, 1818. Lent by Mr. 

Arthur F. Hilf, 

1510. Schenck. — Viol da Gamba player. Lent by Mr. Alfred Hill. 

1511. Schmid, Melchior , Lutenist.— Portrait by H . C . Schollenberger. 

Lent by Mrs. Julian Marshall. 

1513. Schubert, Ferdinand, brother of Franz Schubert. — Portrait. 

Lent by Miss Geisler-Schubert. 

1514. Schubert, Franz. — Print of Composer in circle of friends. 

Lent by Miss Geisler-Schubert. 

1515. Schubart, C. F. D — Wirtembergischer Hof Dichter. Lent 

by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1516. Schumann. — Enlarged photo. Lent by Miss Eugenie 

Schumann. 

1517. Schumann.— Photo, from a Daguerreotype. Lent by Miss 

Eugenie Schumann. 

1519. Sebald, Jacob (1616-1663).— Portrait. Lent by Mr. Arthur 

F. Hill. 

1520. A Selection of Caricatures of leading Singers by C. Lyall. 

Lent by Mr. G. H. Johnstone. 

132 



1521. Senesino. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1522. Servais, Francois — Portrait of the distinguished Belgian 

'Cellist, 1807-66. Lent by Mr. W. H. Pettit. 

1523. Shield, William, Master of the King's Musick, 1 8 1 7.— Portrait. 

Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

1524. Shield, W. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1525. Signior Violincello. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1526. Smith, J. C. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1527. Song. — With French and English words, written about 1270 

a.d., preserved among the records of the Ciiy of London, 
(photographic facsimile). By permission of the Lord Mayor 
and Corporation. 

1528. Spencer, C. C— Photo. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1529. Spohr, L — Dillmarsch. Lent by Mr. W. T. Freemantle. 

1530. Spohr, L — Andre\ Lent by Mr. W. T. Freemantle. 

1531. Staden, Sigismnndus Theophilns. — W. Kerr Pinzit. 

G. Sandrat, Sc. Ao. 1669. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1532. Stanley. — Organist, J. McArdle, fecit. From the Gulstone 

and Stowe Collection. Lent by Mr. Arthur HiU. 

1533. Stanley, J. (two in one frame). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1534. Stanley, John, Mus. Bac, 1779 (Master of the King's 

Musick). — Portrait. Lent by J. S. Bumpus. 

1535. Steibelt, D. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1536. Storace, S. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1538. "A Snnday Concert."— Print. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1539. Tallis. — Lithograph of the signatures of those who sang in 

Tallis's 40-part song at the Madrigal Festival of 1836, also 
that of 1890. Lent by Mr. T. L. Southgate. 

1540. " Tartini's Dream." Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1541. "Tartini's Dream," A. Davis Cooper. Lent by Mr. Alfred 

Gibson. 

1542. Taylor, E. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1543. The Tempest, Heath Del. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1544. Templeton, John, by Blaikley. Lent by Mr. D. J. Blaikley. 

1545. Tenducci. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1546. Thalberg, S— Caricature. Lent by Mr. Burnham W. 

Horner. 

133 



1547. Thalberg, S— Caricature. Lent by Mr. Burnham W. Horner. 

1543. Ullman, Alexander. — In Niirnberg, aetis 66 anno 1602. 
Lent by Mr. A. F. Hill. 

1549. Un-named Print (Lute Player and other Figures) —A de 

Costa. Lent by Mrs. Cecil Bosanquet. 

1550. Unknown Man holding MS. Score. Lent by Mr. W. 

Gilbert. 

1551. VeMentini, Ochsenkun, Melchior Schmid, and Gaspar 

Dniffoprugcar. — Four portraits in one frame. Lent by 
Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1552. Viganoni, J. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1553. Viotti, J. B. — Water Colour. Lent by Lionel Benson. 

1554. Viotti, J. B. Lent by Lionel Benson. 

1555. Vivaldi, A. Lent by Lionel Benson. 

1556. Wagner, Richard.— Copper print. Lent by Mr. A. Rummer. 

1557. Wagner, E. — Photogravure. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1558. Wagner, Eichard. — Daguerreotype. Lent by Mr. A. 

Rummer. 

1559. Walker. — First Macheath in " Beggar's Opera." Lent by 

Mr. Burnham W. Horner. 

1560. Walmisley, T. A. — Drawing. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1561. Waltz. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1562. Warren, E. T. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1563. Webbe, S. — Drawing. Lent by Mr. Lionel Benson. 

1564. Wells, D. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1565. Welter, Christopher. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1566. Welter, Lorenz, Lautenist, b. 1560 ; d. 1645. Lent by 

Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1567. Wellter, Johann (1614-1666). Stadt Musicus, Niirnberg.— 

Portrait. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1568. Wesley, Samuel. — Printed by J. Russell. Engraved by 

W. Dickinson. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1569. Wesley, S. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1570. Wesley, S. S— Photo. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1571. Woodward del Sticcatto.^— Etched by Roberts. Lent by 

Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1572. Zamperini. L^nt by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

131 



Engravings. 

Lent by the Hon. Mrs. SPENCER. 

1573. Bach, Joh. Seb. 

1574. Mozart, Leopold, Marianne (aged 1 1) and Wolfgang (aged 7). 

1575. Mozart. — From Print by C. Kohl. 

1576. Mendelssohn, F. Bartholdy. 

1577. Liszt, Franz.— Three Portraits. 

1578. Spohr, L. 

1579. Kardini, Pietro. 

1530. Locatelli Pietro. 

1531. Meyerbeer, Giacomo. 

1532. Rossini, Gioacchino. 

1533. Weber, C. M. von. 

1534. Crotch, W., Mus. Doc. 

1535. Paer, F. 

1536. Handel, G. F. 

1587. Gluck, J. C. von. 

1588. Beriot, C. de. 
1583. Paganini. N. 

1590. Paganini, N. — Pencil Sketch. 

1591. Rossini, Paganini, and Mme, J. Pasta. 

1592. Pasta. 

1593. Pasta, as " Semiramis." 

1594. Pasta, as " Medea." 

1595. Beethoven, L. van. 

1596. Vieuxtemps, Henri, with Autograph. 

1597. Schumann, Clara. 

1598. Schumann, Robert. 

1599. Dussek, J. L. 

1600. Rogers, Samuel. 

For other Porcraits, etc., see Artaria Special Case infra. 
135 



SPECIAL CASE 

Containing Documents, Letters, and Portraits 

Lent by Messrs. ART ARIA. 

BEETHOVEN. 

1601. Agreement concerning the three trios (Op. i), May 17th, 1795, 

with the composer's signature and seal. 

1602. Letter to "Sir John Falstaff." (See under Letters.) 

1603. Heliogravure, after the picture of Kugelgen. 

1604. Lithograph, after the drawing of Ludwig Schnorr (c. 1807). 

1605. Lithograph, after the picture of Stieler, engraved by Diirck 

(1819). 

16D6. Engraving by Hofel, after Letronne (1814). 

1607. Engraving by Steinmiiller, after Decker (1827). 

1608. Etchings by Daniel Bohm. 

1609. Lithograph of Teycek, Prague (1841). 

1610. Original Lithograph of T. Danhauser : " Beethoven on his 

Deathbed." 

1611-12-13. Original Oil Studies by T. Danhauser, taken after 
death : the Mask, the Head, and Hands. 

1614. Invitation Card to Funeral. 

BOCCHERINI, LUIGI. 

1615. Letter to Dr. C. E. Andreoli. 

CLEMENTI, MUZIO. 

1616. Letter (London: December 21, 1798) to Artaria & Co. 

1617. Engraving by Hardy (1794). 

HAYDN, JOSEPH. 

1618. Letter (November 23, 1781) to Artaria & Co. 

1619. Contract (June 13, 1790) with Artaria & Co., signed by the 

composer. 

1620. Letter (October 6, 1800) to Artaria & Co. 

1621. Letter (August 17, 1805) to Artaria & Co. 

136 



HAYDN, JOSEPH.— continued. 

1622. Leaf from an Album, signed (1806). 

1623. Engraved Portrait by T. E. Mansfeld. 

1624. Engraved (coloured) Portrait by Ziterer. 

1625. Engraved Portrait by Hardy. 

1626. Medaillon. 

1627. Title-page to Posthumous Works. 

MENDELSSOHN-BARTHOLDY. 

1628. Letter (April 9, 1844) to Artaria & Co. 

MOZART, LEOPOLD (Father of Composer). 

1629. Letter (March 21, 1786) to Artaria & Co. 

1630. Portrait. 

MOZART, WOLFGANG AMAD. 

1631. Letter (Feb. 10, 1787) to his father. 

1632. Letter (Naples, May 19-30, 1770) to his sister. 

1633. Portrait engraved by T. G. Mansfeld (1789), after Posch. 

1634. Silhouette. 

1635. Portrait by Posch, engraved by Neidl. 

1636. Medaillon. 

1637. Mozart Family, after Carmontelle, engraved by Delafosse 

(1767). 

ONSLOW, GEORGE. 

1638. Letter (November 8, 1820) to Artaria & Co. 

PAGAN INI, NICOLO. 

1639. Letter (June 2, 1828) to Artaria & Co. 

1640. Portrait by Caporali. 

1641. Portrait, after Drawing by Ingres. 

PLEYEL, IGNAZ. 

1642. Letter (November 22, 1792) to Artaria & Co. 

1643. Letter (August 19, 1800) to Artaria & Co. 

1644. Portrait by Hardy, engraved by Neidl. 

137 



ROSSINI, GIOACHINO. 

1645. Letter (1822) to Artaria & Co. 

1646. Portrait. — Engraving by Beyer. 

SPONTINI, GASPARO. 

1647. Letter (September 30, 1823) to Artaria & Co. 

VIEUXTEMPS, HENRI. 

1648. Air Varie (dedicated to Dominik Artaria, 1837). — Auto. 

1649. Portrait.. — Lithograph by Kriehuber (1837). 

1650. Portrait. — Lithograph by Baugniet, London, 1845. With 

dedication to August Artaria. 

WEBER, CARL MARIA v. 

1651. Letter (December 9, 1800), with a proof of Lithograph 

Music'Printing. 

Portraits of Composers, Etc. 

1652. Beriot, E. de. — Lithograph by Kriehuber, 1839. 

1653. Cherubini. — Engraving by Pfeiffer. 

1654. Giuliani, IT. — Painted by Grassi, engraved by Tizel. 

1655. Hansel, Peter. — Painted by Grassi, engravedby Pfeiffer. 

1656. KaLYbrenner, Friedr. — Engraved by Hyrtl. 

1657. Mayseder, Joseph. — Painted by Letronne, engraved by 

H6fel, 1 8 15. 

1658. Mercadante, S— Painted by Hyrtl. 

1659. Meyerbeer, J. — Engraved by Heinrich del Krepp. 

1660. Moscheles, T— Engraved by Bayer. 

1661. Paer, Ferdinand. — Steinmiiller. 

1662. Thalberg, S— Lithograph by Staub, 1835. 

138 



Printed Music. 

1663. 'Denkmaler der Tonkunst, in Oesterreich, XI. Jahrgang, 
1904. 

I. Halbband: 6 Trienter Codices. Gestliche u. welt. 
Compositionen des XV. Jahrh. 

II. Halbband: Muffat. Auserlesene mit Ernst u. 
Lust ge'mengte Instrumental Music, 1701. 

1664. Michalek, Joachim.— Coloured Heliogravure. 

Documents— Manuscript. 

1665. Banister, John. — Autograph (June 14, 1683). Lent by Mr. 

R. E. Brandt. 

1666. Beethoven.— Address, Kothgasse No. 60 First floor, the door 

on the left. In Beethoven's handwriting. Lent by Mr. 
Adolph Schlosser. 

1667. Beethoven, L. van. — Agreement (May, 1795) concerning the 

three Trios, Op. 1, with composer's signature and seal. 
They were published by Artaria in that year. Lent by 
Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria case No. I.) 

1658. Beethoven, L. van. — Official receipt for salary, from Thayer's 
collection. Lent by Mr. Alfred Morten. 

1669. Braddock, E. (father-in-law of Dr. Blow). — Bill for writing 

8 anthems in a new sett of books, 1693. Lent by the Dean 
and Chapter of Westminster. 

1670. Cantata. — Libretto by the Duke of Wellington. Lent by 

Madame Costa. 

1671. Croft, Dr. W. — Proposal for payment for tuning and repairing 

organ by C. Shreder ; witnessed by Dr. W. Croft, 1708. 
Lent by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. 

1672. Document relating to the King's Private Band, in which 

Purcell's name appears. Lent by the Royal Society of 
Musicians. 

1672a. Handel. — Autograph Will. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1673. Handel. — Inventory of household goods. Lent by Dr. W. H 

Cummings. 

1674. Haydn, Jos.— Signature in Album (1806). Lent by Messrs 

Artaria. (See Special Artaria case No. 22.) 

1675. Hooper, E. — Bill for mending Violls, 1602. Lent by the Dean 

and Chapter of Westminster. 

1676. Mendelssohn.— Certificate of Doctor's Degree, Leipzig, 1836. 

Lent by Mr. Felix Moscheles. 

139 



1677. Payment to Sackbutts and Cornets, 1644. Lent by the 

Dean and Chapter of Westminster. 

1678. Portman, Richard (Organist). — Order to pay his salary"; 

signed by the Committee of Lords and Commons sitting at 
the Deanery, 1648. Lent by the Dean and Chapter of 
Westminster. 

1679. Pnrcell, Henry. — Receipt, 1691. Lent by the Dean and 

Chapter of Westminster. 

1680. Pnrcell, Henry. — Agreement between Father Smith and Dean 

and Chapter for adding Stops to Abbey Organ, 1694; 
witnessed by Henry Purcell. Lent by the Dean and Chapter 
of Westminster. 

1681. Smith, B. (Organ Builder). — Receipt, 1692. Lent by the Dean 

and Chapter of Westminster. 

1682. Smith, Father. — Receipt for payment. Lent by the Dean and 

Chapter of Westminster. 



740 



Playbills, Programmes, Mementos. 



PREFACE. 

RELICS of the past are always interesting. 
Musical dictionaries and biographies tell us 
about great musicians and performances of 
their works, of great virtuosi, using that term in the 
best sense of the term, also of their belongings ; and 
yet, in reading, one does not seem to get into direct 
touch with them. In the present Exhibition there are 
many old play-bills : a scarce play-bill of Comus of 
1738 ; programmes, for instance, of the first per- 
formances of Weber's " Oberon " and Mendelssohn's 
" Elijah " ; admission tickets to a Castle Society 
concert of 1734, to one of Salomon's subscription 
concerts at the beginning of the 19th century ; and 
a programme of Jenny Lind's farewell concert. Still 
more attractive, at any rate for the general public, 
are relics of the great masters. Sir Frederick Bridge 
sends, for instance, a bookcase made from wood of 
Purcell's house ; Dr. W. H. Cummings, Handel's Will. 
Then there are well-authenticated locks of hair of 
Beethoven and Schubert ; an inventory of Handel's 
household goods, and a theatre score of " Muzio 
Scaevola" used by him. And, to descend to smaller 
things, there are snuff-boxes which belonged to 
various celebrated musicians ; a manuscript book of 
songs written out for Jenny Lind by Mendelssohn ; 
bracelets worn by Madame Trebelli ; presents to the 
late Sir Arthur Sullivan from Queen Victoria, etc., etc. 
There will be found something to suit all tastes. 
Autograph manuscripts and letters may be more 
valuable, but mementoes of great men who have 
departed, however small, of however little value in 
themselves, are justly prized. The care with which 
so many have been preserved is the outcome, not of 
vulgar curiosity, but of love and veneration. 

T. S. S. 



141 



Programmes, Tickets, etc. 

1683. Berlioz. — Programme of a Concert in Darmstadt, May 23rd, 

1843. — In Composer's handwriting. Lent by Mr. Adolph 
Schlosser. 

1684. Bill of First Performance of "Oberon," with portraits of 

Weber and Miss Paton. Lent by Mr. Burnham W. Horner. 

1685. Birmingham Musical Festival Programme, 1790. Lent 

by Mr. G. H. Johnstone. 

1686. Birmingham Musical Festival Programme, Oct., 1814. 

Lent by G. H. Johnstone. 

1687. Birmingham Musical Festival Programme for 1829, with 

Costa as one of the vocalists. Lent by Mr. G. H.Johnstone. 

1688. Birmingham Musical Festival. — Original Programme of 

Mendelssohn's " Elijah " on its production in 1846, under the 
composer's direction. Lent by Mr. G. H. Johnstone. 

1689. Card of Admission to Concert Room, King's Theatre, 

Haymarket, Wednesday, May 1st, 1801. — Engraved by 
Bartolozzi. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1690. A Collection relating entirely to Paganini, Letters, Bills, 

Portraits, etc. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1691. "ComUS." — Programme of a performance in 1738. Lent by 

Mr. Burnham W. Horner. 

1692. Concert Ticket, Liszt. Lent by Mr. A. Kummer. 

1693. First Series of Prom. Concerts, 1S39. Lent by Mr. 

Burnham W. Horner. 

1694. Foundling Ticket. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1695. Lind, Jenny. — Programme of Farewell Concert. Lent by 

Miss Alice M. Hill. 

1696. Mendelssohn.— Concert of first performance of " St. Paul " in 

London (1837), conducted by the composer. Lent by Mr. 
A. W. Fitzsimmons. 

1697. " The Messiah."— Programmes of performances at the Found- 

ling, 1751 and 1757. Lent by Mr. J. S. Bumpus. 

1898. " The Messiah."— Programme of performance in 1797. Lent 
by Mr. Burnham W. Horner. 

1699. " The Messiah." — Programme of a performance in 18 13. Lent 

by Mr. Burnham W. Horner. 

1700. Playbill, 1767. Lent by Messrs. Broadwood & Sons. 

143 



1701. Playbill of Performances at the Theatre Royal, Weymouth, 

Aug. 25th, 1802. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

1702. Programme (satin; of Concert given at Passau, August 12th, 

1805, at which Klara, Ignaz, and Friedrich Siegl, aged 12,5, 
and 8 respectively, were announced to play, the first and 
third on the violin, the second on the 'cello. Lent by Mr. 
Arthur F. Hill. 

1703. Programme and Autograph of Von-Bulow, of part of 

" Boulanger March." Lent by Mr. Sigmund Beel. 

1704. Royal Programmes (35) of Private Concerts given at Ken- 

sington Palace, Buckingham Palace, and Gloucester House, 

1837- 1860. Lent by Madame Costa. 

1705. Theatre Ticket, admitting to the King's Theatre, dated May 

23rd, 1826, and signed Madame J. Pasta. Lent by Hon. Mrs. 
Spenser. 

1706. Ticket of Admission to Concert Room, King's Theatre, Hay- 

market, May 13, 1801. — Signed by Samuel Arnold and 
very finely engraved by F. Bartolozzi. Lent by Mr. Arthur 
F. Hill. 

1707. Subscription Ticket to Mr. Salomon's Concerts, Willis's 

Rooms, for Six Concerts, commencing April 5th, 1802. 
Signed J. Salomon. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1708. Ticket of Admission (very finely engraved) to a Concert, 

Feb. 10th, 1734, of the Castle Society of Music, one of great 
repute in the middle of the 18th century, and so called 
because the meetings were originally held at the " Castle 
Tavern," in Paternoster Row. Lent by Mr. Arthur F. Hill. 

1709. Wagner Theatre, Bayreuth. — Portions of Tickets, Aug. 27th- 

30th, 1876, for the third Cycle of the Ring. Lent by Mr. 
J. S. Shedlock. 

1710. Whitehall Ticket. Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

1711. An Old Musical Game. — Painted by Annie Young. Lent by 

Mr. Lionel Marks. 

1712. Card of English and Continental Pitch. Lent by Mr. B. 

W. Horner. 

1713. Beethoven, L. van. — Card of Invitation to Funeral (1827). 

Lent by Messrs. Artaria. (See Special Artaria Case, No. 14). 

1714. Beethoven. — Snuff-box, with inscription and lock of the 

composer's hair in lid. Lent by Mr. Plunket Greene. 

1715. Beethoven. — Cast from composer's mask. Lent by Mr. 

Henry Holiday. 

144 



1716. Beethoven.— Bust. Lent by Mr. E. M. Hodgkins. 

1717. Best, W. T.— Metal Plaque. Portrait. Lent by the Positive 

Organ Co. 

1718. Fan.— On one side are signatures of Brahms, Rubinstein' 

Halle, Neruda, Clara Schumann, etc., and on the other' 
sketches by Val Prmsep, Goodall, Leighton, Tadema, Millais' 
Burne Jones, etc. The outer sticks are decorated with 
emblems of music and painting by Arthur Lewis. Lent by 
Miss Agnes Zimmermann. 

1719. Handel.— Mask by Roubilliac. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1720. Handel.— Court Lace Ruffle. Lent by Dr. W. H. Cummings. 

1721. Handel's Pitch Pipe.— Given by him to Dr. Burney (See 

inscriptions inside case). Lent by Mr. C. T. Johnson. 

1722. Handel Commemoration Medal of 1791— Presented to T. S. 

Dupuis, and worn by him at Oxford when Ha^dn was made 
Mus. Doc. Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

1723. Haydn.— Visiting card. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

1724. Kiesewetter.— Snuff-box, presented to Sir George Smart by 

the composer. Lent by Mr. H. Bertram. 

1725. Leslie, Henry. — China Vase, won at the Paris Exhibition in 

l $75i by Leslie's Choir. Lent by Messrs. Broadwood & Sons. 

1726. Lind, Jenny. — Medal struck in Sweden in her honour. Lent 

by Mr. N. Manskoff. 

1727. Lind, Jenny.' — Wreath of oak leaves worn by her as 

"Norma" at her first benefit performance in 1 845, at the 
• Royal Opera, Berlin. Lent by Mr. Otto Goldschmidt. 

1728. Lind, Jenny. — Medals (3) — gold, silver, and copper, struck 

at Vienna in her honour. Lent by Mrs. Raymond Maude. 

1729. Lind, Jenny. — Life-size marble Bust, by J. Durham, R.A. ; 

replica by the sculptor. Lent by Mr. Otto Goldschmidt. 

1730. Mendelssohn. — Visiting Card. Lent by Lady Cusins. 

1731. Paganini. — Snuff-box, with hand-painted miniature. Lent by 

Mr. Sigmund Beel. 

1732. Pasta, Metal Plaque.— Portrait. Lent by Mr. N. Manskoff. 

1733. Pnrcell, Henry. — Bookcase made from wood of his house. 

Lent by Sir Frederick Bridge. 

1734. Purcell, Henry. — Coat-of-Arms framed in wood from the old 

organ case (Westminster Abbey). Lent by Sir Frederick 
Bridge. 

1735. Schubert, Franz. — Miniature with lock of composer's hair. 

Lent by Miss Carola Geistter-Schubert. 

145 



1736. Sullivan, Arthur— Pair of Candlesticks and Inkstand pre- 

sented to him by Queen Victoria in acknowledgment of 
services at State Concert, 1893 ; also Studs and Sleeve Links 
presented by the Emperor William. Lent by Mr. Herbert 
Sullivan. 

1737. Spinning Wheel with Music Cylinder and Pipes. Lent by 

Miss E. A. Willmott. 

1738. Trebelli, Madame. — Bracelets worn by her in "Carmen." 

Lent by Mr. B. W. Horner. 



Medals of Musicians, etc. 

Medals lent by Mr. RICHARD EPSTEIN. 

Abt, Auber, Bach, Beethoven (3, one with Haydn and Mozart), 
Berlioz, Boieldieu, Brahms, Bruckner, Ole Bull, Billow, Chopin, 
Corelli, Dengremont, Dodd (with Handel), Donizetti, Eisner, Forster, 
Glinka, Gluck, Gossec (with Depres, Rore, Mons, etc.) Gounod, 
Gretry, Habeneck, Handel (3), Haydn, Lasso, Liszt (2), Lully, 
Marais, Mehul, Mendelssohn (1), Mercadante, Meyerbeer, Mozart (3), 
Offenbach, Martini Padre, Paganini, Palestrina, Pergolese, Piatti 
Piccinni, Pleyel, Raff (with B. Scholz and Dr. Hoch), Rameau, 
Rossini, Rouget de Lisle, Rousseau, Rubinstein, Schubert (2)> 
Schumann (2), R. and Clara Schumann, Servais, Smetana, Spontini, 
Stainer, Strauss Vater (with Lanner), Strauss Sohn, Tartini, 
Thalberg, Verdi (with Bellini, Donizetti, and Rossini), Viotti, 
Wagner, Weber, Hugo Wolf. 

Also Bassgeiger, Victoria, Sweden (2 halves), Conservat, Paris, 
Frankfurt Synagoge, Coin Musikfest, Diisseldorf ' Musikfest, 
Academia Roma, Mehul Gesellschaft, and R£publique Francaise. 



Medals lent by Mr. Herbert Thompson. 

Beethoven (French medal) ; Haydn (medal) ; Lassus Orlando di 

(medal) ; Mozart (medal struck to commemorate the erection of the 

Viennese monument in 1896; Wagner (two medals). 

146 



LIST OF LENDERS. 



His Majesty the King. 

Abergavenny , Marquess of. 
Amherst of Hackney, Lord. 
A du Cros. 
Arkwright, J. E. P. 
Artaria & Co. 
Aylward, T. E. 

Beaumont, Captain A. S. 
Beel, Sigmund. 
Benson, Lionel. 
Blaikley, D. J. 
Boosey, & Co. 
Borwick, Sir Robert. 
Bosanquet, Mrs. Cecil. 
Bowman, James. 
Braddyll, Miss M. 
Braddyll, Miss M. 
Brandt, R. E. 

Brasenose College, Oxford. 
Bridge, Sir F. 
Bridges, J. H. 
Broidwood, John, & Sons. 
Bumpus, J. S. 
Burnett, Alfred. 

Canterbury, Archbishop of. 

Case, Thomas. 

Chancellor, A. 

Chapman, J. T. 

Chapman, Mrs. 

Charrington, John. 

Chester Archaeological Society 

The. 
Christ Church College. 
Clementi-Smith, Rev. A. E. 
Collard and Collard. 
Cook, Mrs. A. K. 
Corpus Christi College, Oxford. 



Costa, Mine. 
Courtauld, Mrs. 
Cowan, William. 
Cowen, Dr. F. H. 
Cox, Bertram H. 
Crews, C. T. D. 
Cummings, Dr. W. H. 
Currey, W. E. 
Cusins, Lady. 

Darmstaedler, Dr. 
Dean, Mrs. Edmund. 
Donaldson, G. 
Duckworth, H. 

Dudley, Her Excellency the 
, Countess of. 
Durlacher Bros. 
Dyke, E. O. 

Elgar, Dr. Edward. 
Emmanuel College, Cambridge. 
Enoch & Sons. 
Epstein, R; 

Fellowes, Rev. E. 
Fellowes, Rev. E. H. 
Festing, M. H. 
Fitzsimmons, A. W. 
Freemantle, W. S. 

Galpin, Rev. F. W. 

Geisler-Schubert, Madame. 

Gibson, A. 

Gilbert, W. 

Glasgow and West of Scotland 

Techical College, The. 
Glen, John. 

Glyn, Sir Gervase P., Bart. 
Goldschmidt, Otto. 
Granville, Major Bevil. 
Green, H. Plunket. 



147 



LIST OF LENDERS. 



Hahn. 

Hampton, Rev. J. 
Harding, Dr. H. A. 
Harper, T. A. 
Hart, G. 

Head, William Howard. 
Hill, A. G, M.A., F.S.A. 
Hill, Alfred E. 
Hill, Miss Alice M. 
Hill, Arthur F. 
Hill & Sons, W. E. 
Hipkins, Miss E. J. 
Holiday, Henry. 
Hodgkins, E. M. 
Hopkinson, J. & J. 
Horner, Burnham W. 
Horner, E. F., Mus. Doc. 
Howe, Earl, G.C.B. 
Huggins, Lady. 

Jackson, John. 
Johnson, C. T. 
Johnstone, G. H. 



Moscheles, F. 

Music Schools, Oxford, The. 

O'Leary, Arthur. 
O'Neill, The Hon. Robert, M.P. 
Oxford and Cambiidge Musical 
Club. 

Pagden, Mrs. and Miss Ferrari. 

Parry, Sir C. Hubert H. 

Paterson, W. B. 

Patten, A. F. 

Pawle, F. C. 

Payne, E. J. 

Pettit, W. H. 

Philharmonic Society, The 

Pingrie, F. 

Place, Miss G. C. 

Positive Organ Co. 

Prodgers, Mrs. C. 

Provost and Fellows of Eton, The. 

Queen's College, Oxford. 



King, Henry. 
Kummer, A. 

Littleton, Alfred. 
Lucas, Seymour, R.A. 
Ludwig, Joseph. 

Macfarren, Walter. 
Mackenzie, Sir A. C. 
Magdalen College, Oxford. 
Mahillon, C, & Co. 
Maitland, Fuller. 
Manning, W. Westley. 
Manns, Sir August. 
Manskopf, Nicolas. 
Marks, L. 

Marshall, Mrs. Julian. 
Matthew, J. E. 
Maude, Mrs. Raymond. 
McCaskie, R. 
Miller, Mrs. Christie. 
Morley, J. G. 
Morten, Alfred. 



Raalte, C. van. 
Randegger, C. A. 
Ronalds, Mrs. M. F. 
Royal Academy of Music. 
Royal College of Music. 
Royal Irish Academy of Music. 
Royal Society of Musicians. 
Rowe, L. T. 
Rudall, Carte & Co. 

St. John's College, Oxford. 
St. Michael's College, Tenbury. 
St. Paul's, Dean and Chapter of 
Samuel, Stuart M„ M.P. 
Sandeman, E. A. 
Sandys, Col. T. Myles. 
Sasson, Mrs. 
Schloesser, Adolf. 
Schubert, Miss C. Geisler. 
Schumann, Miss E. 
Searles, E. F. 

Shaw-Hellier, Colonel- T, B. 
Shedlock, J. S. 



148 



LIST OF LENDERS. 



Simoclan, Mrs. and Miss Agnes 

Done. 
Slocombe, A. J. 
Smith, Rev. Dr. Cooper. 
Smith, F. Y. 
Smith, Watson. 
Snelling, Henry. 
Society of Antiquaries of London, 

The. 
Southgate, T. L. 
Spagnoletti, C. E. 
Spencer, Hon. Mrs. C. R. 
Stainer, Lady. 
Stainer, ]. F. R. 
Stanford, Sir C. Villiers. 
Steggall, C, Mus. Doc. 
Sternberg, H. L. 
Street, J. E. 
Street, Oscar W. 
Sullivan.H., Esq. 

Tangye, Sir Richard. 
Taphouse, T. W. 



Thompson, Herbert. 
Trinity College, Dublin. 

Verhulst, Ellischer. 
Victoria and Albert Museum. 

Waefelghem, L. van. 
Ward, Rev. Bernard. 
Warwick, The Earl and Countess 

of. 
Watson, Henry. 
Wemyss, The Earl of. 
Westminster, Dean and Chapter 

of. 
Westrope, J. 
Wetton, Dr. Davan. 
Wiener, Mrs. W. 
Willmott, Miss E. A. 
Wilson, C. J. 
Wood, J. 
Wyndham, H. Saxe. 

Zimmermann, Miss A. 




U9 



O UBSCRIBERS' names are now being 
received for an Edition-de-luxe of 
the Catalogue, illustrated with Photo- 
gravures of the principal exhibits, which 
will be published shortly* 

A limited number of . Copies will be 
printed, and the price to Subscribers will 
be One Guinea. 





Clx Ropal flcademp of music, 

TENTERDEN STREET, HANOVER SQUARE. 

INSTITUTED, 1822. INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER, 1830. 



patron : 
HIS MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY THE KING. 



Crtsltrent ; 

H.R.H. THE DUKE OF CONNAUGHT AND STRATHEARN, K.G. 

principal : 

SIR ALEXANDER CAMPBELL MACKENZIE, Mos. D., LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.A.M. 



The Royal Academy of Music offers to students of both sexes 
(whether amateur or professional) a thorough training in all branches of 
music under the most able and distinguished Professors. In addition to 
receiving individual lessons in the various branches of the Curriculum, 
students have the advantage of attending the Orchestral, Choral, and 
Chamber Music Classes, and the weekly lectures on music and musicians. 
Evidence of their progress is 'given at the Fortnightly and Public Concerts 
and by periodical Operatic and Dramatic Performances. 

There are three Terms in the Academic year — viz., the Michaelmas 
Term, from Michaelmas to Christmas ; the Lent Term, from early in 
January to Easter; and the Midsummer Term, from early in May until 
the end of July. 

The Fee for the ordinary curriculum is II Guineas per Term. 

A large number of Scholarships and Prizes are founded and are com- 
peted for periodically. 

Students who show special merit and ability receive the distinction 
of being elected by the Directors Associates of the Institution, and are 
thereby entitled to the use after their names of the initials A.R.A.M. 
Students who distinguish themselves in the musical profession after 
quitting the Institution may be elected by the Directors Fellows of the 
Royal Academy of Music, and are thereupon entitled to the use after their 
names of the initials F.R.A.M. 

Subscribers have the privilege of attending the Lectures and Public 
Concerts and of introducing friends in proportion to the amount of their 
subscriptions. 

An examination of persons trained independently of the Academy is 
held twice a year — viz., during the Summer and Christmas vacations — 
successful candidates at which are elected Licentiates of the Academy, 
and are thereupon entitled to the use after their names of the initials 
L.R.A.M. 

Prospectus, entry form, and all further information may be obtained 
on application. 

F. W. RENAUT, Secretary. 




THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC, 

Prince Consort Road, South Kensington, London, S.W. 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER, 1883. 



Patron— HIS MAJESTY THE KINO. 



President— H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES, K.G. 

Director— Sir C. HUBERT H. PARRY, Bart., D.C.L., M. A., Mus. Doc. 

Honorary Secretary— Charles Morley, Esq., M.P. 

Registrar— Frank Pownall, Esq., M.A. 



The Royal College of Music was founded at the instance, and through 
the exertions, of His present Majesty (then Prince of Wales), its first Presi- 
dent, and now its Patron, and was incorporated by Royal Charter, May 23, 
1883. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales succeeded His Majesty as President. 

The building in Prince Consort Road was erected through the muni- 
ficence of the late Mr. Samson Fox, M.I.C.E., at a cost of ^48,000, on a 
site granted by the Royal Commissioners for the Exhibition of 1851. The 
fine concert hall in rear of the building, capable of accommodating an 
audience of nearly 1 ,000, was subsequently added. 

The College offers a complete course of musical instruction to pupils, 
male and female, professional and amateur. Choral, Orchestral, and 
Chamber Music Concerts take place at fortnightly intervals during term 
time, at which pupils sufficiently advanced have the opportunity of dis- 
playing their ability ; admission to these concerts is by invitation, but 
Annual Subscribers have the privilege of attending them, and also the 
practices cf the Orchestra and Choral Class. An important College event 
is the Annual Opera Performance given by the pupils at some West-end 
theatre. At these performances many interesting works have been presented 
to the English public, some of them for the first time. 

The College enjoys a permanent Endowment Fund supporting sixty-four 
Scholarships and Exhibitions, which provide free musical education, and in 
some cases a grant towards maintenance. There are also Council Exhibitions, 
Prizes, and other advantages, for particulars of which see the Syllabus. 

An examination for Certificate of Proficiency with the title of " Associate 
of the Royal College of Music " (A.R.C.M.) is held in April. 

TERMS, FEES, &c. 

The next Term commences on 22nd September. The Tuition Fee is 
Twelve Guineas per Term. Students must continue at College for at least 
three Terms. 

A Junior Department has been established to provide for Pupils under 
16 whose time is also occupied by the necessities of their general education. 
The Pee is Six Guineas per Term. 




The Associated Board 

Of the ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC and 

ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC for 

Local Examinations in Mus ic. 

Patron . . HIS MAJESTY THE KING. 
President . . H.R.H. THE PRINCE OP WALES, K.Q. 



Associated Board : — 

THOMAS THRELFALL, Esq. (R.A.M.), Chairman. 

Hon. G. W. SPENCER LYTTELTON.C.B. (R.C.M.), Deputy Chairman. 

Sir ALEXANDER C. MACKENZIE, Mus. Doc, St. And., Cantab, ct Edin., LL.D., 

D.C.L., Principal of R.A.M. 

Sir C. HUBERT H. PARRY, Bart., M.A., Mus. Doc, Cantab., Oxon , et Dubl 

D.C.L., Director of R.C.M. 



Royal Academy of Music : 
OSCAR BERINGER, Esq. 
Professor JAMES DEWAR, F.R.S., 
WALTER MACFARREN, Esq. 
CAVe. ALBERTO RANDEGGER. 



&c. 



Royal College of Music : 

EATON FAN1NG, Esq., Mus. Doc.Cantab. 
Sir WALTER PARRATT, M.V.O., Mus. 

Doc, Oxon. 
Professor Sir CHARLES V. STANFORD, 

D.C L., M. A., Mus. Doc, Cantab, et Oxon. 
FRANKLIN TAYLOR, Esq. 



Honorary treasurer : CHARLES MORLEY, Esq., M.P. 

Auditor : LESLEY C. PROBYN, Esq. 

Secretary : JAMES MUIR, Esq. 

Bankers : BANK OF ENGLAN D, Western Branch, Burlington Gardens, London, W. 

THE Board holds Examinations throughout the United Kingdom and in the Colonies 
in both Theoretical and Practical Music. The Examinations are of two kinds, 
" Local Centre " and *' School." The Local Centre Examinations are carried out 
by two Examiners chosen almcst exclusively from the Staffs of the Royal Academy of 
Music and of the Royal College of Music. The School Examinations are conducted by 
one Examiner. 



The subjects for Examination are comprised in the following list :■ 



RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 
HARMONY AND GRAMMAR 

OF MUSIC. 
COUNTERPOINT. 



BASS. 



DOUBLE 

HARP. 

WIND INSTRUMENTS. 

SINGING. 



Local Centre Examinations. 



PIANOFORTE. 
ORGAN. 
VIOLIN. 
VIOLA. 

VIOLONCELLO. 

Examinations in Theory held annually in March 
and November in all Centres. In Practical Subjects in March — April at all Centres; and 
in London and district in November — December also. For particulars see Syllabus A. 

School Examinations are held three times a year : viz., (a) March — April ; [b) June — 
July; and (c) October — November. For particulars see Syllabus B. 

Local Centre and School Examination Papers of past years can be obtained, price 
3d. per set, per year, post-free. 

The Board gives annually Six Exhibitions tenable for two or three years. 
These Exhibitions are limited to' Candidates under twenty years of age, who fulfil certain 
conditions set forth in each Syllabus. 

Syllabuses A and B, Forms of Entry, Theory Papers, and any further information, 
may be obtained from the Secretary : — 

James Muir, 

Telegraphic Address — Central Office : 14, Hanover Square, London, W. 

*' Associa, London." 



The Royal 

College of Organists, 

Kensington Gore, S.W. 

INSTITUTED 1864. INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1893. 

Patrons. 

THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, 
THE ARCHBISHOP OF YORK, and 
THE BISHOP OF LONDON. 

president. 
Sir FREDERICK BRIDGE, M.V.O., Mus.D. 



ESTABLISHED 

To provide a Central Organization in London of the 
Profession of Organist. 

To provide a system of Examinations and Diplomas for 
the better definition and protection of the Profession, 
and to secure competent Organists for the service of 
the Church. 

To afford opportunities for intercourse among Members of 
the Profession, and for the discussion of professional 
topics. 

To encourage the composition and study of Sacred Music. 



Intending Members should address the Secretary for particulars of the 

Examinations held for the Diplomas of Associates and Fellows 

of the College. 

fjoq. treasurer. TJon. Secretary. 

J. NORBURY, Esq. Dr. E. H. TURPIN. 

Registrar. 
T. SHINDLER, Esq., M.A., LL.B. 



CDc Guildhall School of music, 

Established by the Corporation of London In 1880, 
And under the Management and Control of the Music Committee. 

Chairman- GEORGE H. HELLBUTH, Esq., C.C. 

VICTORIA EMBANKMENT, EC 

(Near Black friars Bridge.) 



Principal— WILLIAM H. CUMMlNGS, Esq., Mus. Doc, Dub., 
F.S.A., Hon. R.A.M. 



FOR PROFESSIONAL AND AMATEUR STUDENTS, ALSO FOR 
CANDIDATES FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS. 



The Guildhall School of Mrsic provides high-class instruction 
in the art and science of Music at moderate cost to the Student. 

The year is divided into Three Terms, commencing as follows : — Fourth 
Monday in September, Second Monday in January, Fourth Monday in April. 

OPERATIC TRAINING. — The School possesses a completely 
equipped Theatre. Public Performances periodically given. Stagecraft, 
Elocution, Gesture and Deportment Taught by Eminent Professors. 

no Prizes, Medals, and Scholarships, giving free and assisted tuition, 
competed for annually. 

The Fees vary according to the Professor selected, and range from 
£i lis. 6d. to £6 6s. od. per Term of Twelve weeks. Fencing Classes, 
Fee £i ns. 6d. per Term. 

Chamber Music, Harmony, Elocution, French, German, and Italian 
Classes. Rudiment Classes, Fee 7s. 6d. per Term. SIGHT SINGING 
and SIGHT READING (Instrumental) Classes, Fee 5s. per Term. ORGAN 
LESSONS given Daily. Evening Lessons and Practice arranged. 

An Examination of persons trained independently of the Guildhall 
School is held twice a year. The successful candidates are elected Licentiates 
of the Guildhall School of Music, and are thereupon entitled to the use after 
their names of the initials L.G.S.M. 

Lady Superintendent, Mrs. Charles P. Smith. 

Prospectus and full particulars maybe obtained on application to 

H. SAXE WYNDHAM, Secretary. 



Crinitp College Condon. 

INSTITUTED 1872. 

President : 
The Right Hon. LORD COLERIDGE, M.A., K.C. 

Warden : 
EDMUND H. TURPIN, Mus. D. 



Michaelmas, Lent and Trinity Terms (twelve weeks each) begin re- 
spectively in September, January, and April. 

The Teaching Department provides for the instruction and training of all 
classes of Musical Students, as follows : — ■ 

1. Full Professional Course in Theoretical and Practical Music, in- 

cluding prepaiation for Teaching Diplomas or University Degrees. 

2. Special Courses in one or more subjects for Professional or Amateur 

Students. 

3. Lectures and Demonstrations on the Art of Teaching as applied to 

Music, Musical History, &c. 

4. School of Pianoforte Technique, with Virgil Clavier lessons and 

practice. 

5. Post-Graduate Course for the Doctorate of the University of London. 

6. Junior School of Music, introductory to the Higher Curriculum. 



Examinations in Music for Teachers. 

These Higher Examinations are held in January and July. Candidates 
for the Diploma of Associate in Music are required to Matriculate or pass 
an equivalent examination, and those for the Diploma of Licentiate in 
Music must previously have obtained the Grade of Associate in Music. 
In the case of Practical Diplomas Matriculation is not required. 

The recommended text-books are named in the regulations, which may be 
had, together with forms of entry and other necessary particulars, on 
application. 

The Examination in the Art of Teaching is also open to all present 
holders of Diplomas and Higher Certificates. 

Local Examinations. 

The Musical Knowledge Examinations are held in June and December. 
The Instrumental and Vocal Music Examinations are held from 
November to July inclusive, at various centres throughout the United 
Kingdom. 

Scholarships. 

Scholarships and Exhibitions for both sexes are awar ded annually. 
The prospectus of the Teaching Department (including that for the 
Junior School, the Virgil Clavier Department, and the regulations for 
Scholarships) and the Higher and Local Examination Syllabuses, may be 
had from the undersigned. 

By order, 

SHELLEY FISHER, 

Secretary. 
Mandeville Place, Manchester Square, W. 



Incorporated SoGiety of ]tolcians, 

19, BERNERS STREET, LONDON, W. 

ESTABLISHED 1882. INCORPORATED 1892. 



founded with \\z following objects :— 

To provide an organisation which shall unite and represent 
the musical profession. 

To provide opportunities for social intercourse among its 
members, and to hold meetings for the discussion 
of subjects relating to music. 

To promote the culture of music, and to encourage 
musical composition. 

To improve musical education, and to hold examinations 
in which a high standard of music attainment shall 
be maintained. 

To ensure the competency of teachers by granting a 
Teacher's Certificate after examination. 

To establish Benevolent Funds for the benefit of members 
of the profession. At the present time there are 
twenty-two such funds in connection with the 
various sections of the Society ; in addition to the 
Orphanage for the Children of Musicians, main- 
tained by the Society at 16, Norland Square, 
Notting Hill, London, W. 



Forms of Application for Admission to Membership, together with 
all particulars of the Society, may be obtained from 

EDWARD CHADFIELD, 

General Secretary. 



NOYELLO'S 

SELECTED LIST OF 

Books on Musical Subjects. 

J. S, Bach. 

His Work and Influence on the Music of Germany, 1685-1750. By Philipp 
Spitta. Three Vols. New and revised edition. 

Berlioz, 

A Treatise on Modern Instrumentation and Orchestration. 8vo., cloth. 
Frederick Chopin. 

As a Man and Musician. By Frederick Niecks. Two vols. 
Captain C. It. Day. 

The Music and Musical Instruments of Southern India and the Deccan. 
Illustrated with Seventeen Plates. Handsomely bound. Ditto, Artist's proof 
copies, on finest Japanese paper. 

F, Ttannreuther. 

Musical Ornamentation, from Diruta to modern times. Two Vols. Paper 
covers. Ditto, paper boards. 

F. G. Fdwarda. 

The History of Mendelssohn's " Elijah/' Cloth. 
Carl Fngel. 

The Literature of National Music. Cloth. 

Researches Into the Early History of the Violin Family. Cloth. 
Myles B. Foster. 

Anthems and Anthem Composers. Special paper, tough edges. Ditto, ordinary 
paper. 

Sir George Grove. 

Beethoven and his Nine Symphonies. Cloth. 
Fdtiard Hanslich. 

* 4 The Beautiful in Music." A contribution to the revival of Musical Esthetics. 
Translated by Gustav Cohen. Cloth. 

Moritz Hauptmann. 

The Letters of a Leipzig; Cantor. Translated and arranged by A. D. Coleridge. 
Two Vols. Cloth, gilt. 

A.. J. HipTcin/*. 

A Description and History of the Pianoforte and the older Keyboard 
Stringed Instruments. Paper boards. 

Jenny JAnd. 

A Record and Analysis of the Method of the late Jenny Lind=GoIdschraidt. 

By W. S. Rockstro. Cloth. 

Mozart. 

Life of Mozart. By Otto Jahn. Translated from the German by Pauline D. 
Townsend, with Five Portraits and Preface by Sir George Grove. Three Vols. 
Cloth. 

J. Stainer. 

A Dictionary of Musical Terms. By J. Stainer and W. A. Barrett. Revised 
(,i8g8j Edition. Large 8vo., cloth gilt. 

Stainer, J. f J. F. R. t and C. f and F. W. B. Nicholson. 

Dufay and his Contemporaries. Fifty Compositions, with Facsimiles. 

Early Bodleian Music. Vol. I. containing no Facsimiles of MS- Music. Vol. II- 
containing their transcriptions into Modern Notation. Large folio, half morocco. 

John F. Kelt, 

Cathedral Organists, Past and Present. 



!?♦ Vcrf $ 3 nnounccnicnt$ - 



^^ tfp* ig& 

Madame Melba Concerts — 

HUDDERSFIELD, October 25th. 
MIDDLESBROUGH, October 26th. 
BRIGHTON, November. 4th. 

Sarasate Concerts — 

LONDON and PROVINCES, November— December. 

Antonia Dolores — 

THREE VOCAL RECITALS, ST. JAMES'S HALL, 
June 20th, June 30th, and July 9th, at 3-30. 

Madame Blauvelt — 

TOUR OF GREAT BRITAIN, 

October — December, 1904. 

Lady Halle and Leonard Borwick — 

Recital tour, Winter 1904—5. 

Plunket Greene — 

vocal Recitals, London and provinces, 

Winter igo4- 

Albani Tour — 

England and Scotland, 

October — December, 1904. 

Clara Butt and Kennerley Rumford— 

TOUR OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, 

November — March, 1904 — 5. 

George Grossmith — 

Tour of great Britain and Ireland, 

August— March, 1904—5 

Raoul Pugno— 

RECITAL TOUR, October— November, 1904. 





Medal of the Musicians' Company.